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Armada by Ernest Cline
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Armada

by Ernest Cline

Other authors: Russell Walks (Illustrator (EDA logo))

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,1541925,017 (3.25)106
"THE NEW NOVEL FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF READY PLAYER ONE It's just another day of high school for Zack Lightman. He's daydreaming through another boring math class, with just one more month to go until graduation and freedom--if he can make it that long without getting suspended again. Then he glances out his classroom window and spots the flying saucer. At first, Zack thinks he's going crazy. A minute later, he's sure of it. Because the UFO he's staring at is straight out of the videogame he plays every night, a hugely popular online flight simulator called Armada--in which gamers just happen to be protecting the earth from alien invaders. But what Zack's seeing is all too real. And his skills--as well as those of millions of gamers across the world--are going to be needed to save the earth from what's about to befall it. Yet even as he and his new comrades scramble to prepare for the alien onslaught, Zack can't help thinking of all the science-fiction books, TV shows, and movies he grew up reading and watching, and wonder: Doesn't something about this scenario seem a little too... familiar? Armada is at once a rollicking, surprising thriller, a classic coming of age adventure, and an alien-invasion tale like nothing you've ever read before--one whose every page is infused with author Ernest Cline's trademark pop-culture savvy"--… (more)
  1. 50
    Ready Player One by Ernest Cline (brakketh)
    brakketh: Both books focus on 1980s culture, similar narrative ark for isolated teen to hero.
  2. 40
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Mind_Booster_Noori)
  3. 00
    The Roar by Emma Clayton (Cecrow)
  4. 00
    Tin Men by Christopher Golden (Scottneumann)
  5. 00
    Constellation Games by Leonard Richardson (psybre)
    psybre: Highly recommended for readers who love video games and science fiction and geek. No military/space wars in the plot, but an entertaining and unique one instead.
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» See also 106 mentions

English (184)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (188)
Showing 1-5 of 184 (next | show all)
Not Ready Player One

Some parts of the narrative feel forced. For instance, why are he and his father naturally better at video games? And how is the Admiral better than the young guy?

It felt like the author wanted to tell a particular story and then had to manipulate the plot to fit. Even more than the manipulation the 'enemy' was using against the EDA. The romance/relationship stuff seemed superficial. Lex was only important to provide the hacking skills; the 'instant' attraction was confusing. The scene itself was amusing, but it didn't fully make sense.

If you like old video games or SF movies, there is tons of trivia. But nothing else really works well. ( )
  wildwily | May 28, 2020 |
Most no mistake about it, this is no Ready Player One. It has a similar feel at the beginning, but detours wildly.

In my opinion, RPO was flawless. This book is anything but...the writing feels weak in areas and the main character is super annoying at times. There is also very little character development outside the main character. This book felt rushed and should have been twice as long.

However, I really liked it. I couldn't put it down. Once the story started really revealing itself, I found it extremely compelling.

If you can make it passed the beginning (which I'll admit is quite difficult), it gets really good. ( )
  cgfaulknerog | May 28, 2020 |
Not Ready Player One

Some parts of the narrative feel forced. For instance, why are he and his father naturally better at video games? And how is the Admiral better than the young guy?

It felt like the author wanted to tell a particular story and then had to manipulate the plot to fit. Even more than the manipulation the 'enemy' was using against the EDA. The romance/relationship stuff seemed superficial. Lex was only important to provide the hacking skills; the 'instant' attraction was confusing. The scene itself was amusing, but it didn't fully make sense.

If you like old video games or SF movies, there is tons of trivia. But nothing else really works well. ( )
  wildwily | May 28, 2020 |
I was so disappointed in Cline's second book. I loved Ready Player One and was sucked in to that world so quickly. I found little to love about Armada. I just felt like everything was too generalized and vague for me to find something to connect to and grab on. The time frame is so short - the whole story takes places in 48 hours - and so many things happen that I couldn't fully process anything. Part of the issue for me was the narration of Zack; instead of sounding like an adult author writing an 18 year-old's perspective, it just sounded like an 18 year-old.

I think the idea was a good one but unfortunately it wasn't executed super well. If you want to read Ernest Cline, go pick up Ready Player One and leave Armada behind. ( )
  bookishtexpat | May 21, 2020 |
This book gave me an epiphany and that's not always a good thing apparently. Up to the moment I read this book, I'd started to convince myself that really the main thing that mattered to me in a book was readability. How much was a both looking forward to reading a book and how fast were the pages turning for me? (Or, in this case, how quickly was the audiobook going, and how much was I enjoying hearing it..?). Those are two things I thought a great deal of in terms of likability. Armada had all that, in the beginning. I did look forward to reading it, but it was a very definite slog for me to get through, this time. Also, I started to realize that even though I was enjoying myself, I didn't really think all that much of this story. It's rather bland for the most part and so chalk full of 80's nerdery it's almost as if no other nerdery is allowed or considered worthy.

Now, this 80's geekiness works really well in Cline's debut, Ready Player One because it's essential to the story. Maybe we should add, because it was new, but I don't know if you can go that far. When the premise revolves around the 80s it just works. Here, Armada's 80's affiliation has more to do with a kid's dead father's obsession and begins to grate in all the wrong ways. It's as if this geeky kid never realized there were other nerdy things to do ... even though he's obsessed with a very hyper-futuristic video game that all kids his age are obsessed with. It would have been all fine ad good, with additional, modern references - 80's references are fine - it's just that it begins to sound like that's the only worthy decade when that's far from the truth. So for me, it's like the emphasis makes it seem like you're only cool/geeky if you're up on your 80's geekery. If not, you're not actually a geek. BOO!

Now, I don't want to act like I didn't like Armada. I enjoyed it quite a bit and I admit that is lead me to grabbing the audiobook form of Armada as soon as I was able to. But like I said, after you get over the fact that THE WILL WEATON is narrating the novel, and the story seem way, way too much like the movie The Last Starfighter, things began to fall apart for me. And in the middle? More of that same grindingly slow game playing stuff we all had to wade through, to get through Ready Player One. I still enjoyed Armada, I just won't be fondly remembering my time with the book like I would have liked. It's an interesting premise, and was rather fun in the beginning......and I've forgone mention of the inconsistencies I saw/heard.

I'll still be scooping up Cline's next book, but probably not with as much fervor. Expectations have been tempered.

3 out of 5 Stars (recommended with reservations, on how much reading about gaming you can stand). ( )
  stephanie_M | Apr 30, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 184 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cline, Ernestprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walks, RussellIllustrator (EDA logo)secondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fowler, RalphDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mäkelä, J. PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spratt, SamCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Staehle, WillCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wheaton, WilReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
The only legitimate use of a computer is to play games. --Eugene Jaris, creator of Defender
Dedication
For Major Eric T. Cline, USMC

The bravest person I have ever known

Semper Fi, little brother
First words
I was staring out the classroom window and daydreaming of adventure when I spotted the flying saucer.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Zack Lightman has spent his life dreaming. Dreaming that the real world could be a little more like the countless science-fiction books, movies, and videogames he’s spent his life consuming. Dreaming that one day, some fantastic, world-altering event will shatter the monotony of his humdrum existence and whisk him off on some grand space-faring adventure.

But hey, there’s nothing wrong with a little escapism, right? After all, Zack tells himself, he knows the difference between fantasy and reality. He knows that here in the real world, aimless teenage gamers with anger issues don’t get chosen to save the universe.

And then he sees the flying saucer.

Even stranger, the alien ship he’s staring at is straight out of the videogame he plays every night, a hugely popular online flight simulator called Armada—in which gamers just happen to be protecting the earth from alien invaders.

No, Zack hasn’t lost his mind. As impossible as it seems, what he’s seeing is all too real. And his skills—as well as those of millions of gamers across the world—are going to be needed to save the earth from what’s about to befall it.

It’s Zack’s chance, at last, to play the hero. But even through the terror and exhilaration, he can’t help thinking back to all those science-fiction stories he grew up with, and wondering: Doesn’t something about this scenario seem a little…familiar?

At once gleefully embracing and brilliantly subverting science-fiction conventions as only Ernest Cline could, Armada is a rollicking, surprising thriller, a classic coming of age adventure, and an alien invasion tale like nothing you’ve ever read before—one whose every page is infused with the pop-culture savvy that has helped make Ready Player One a phenomenon.**
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