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Red Rising by Pierce Brown
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Red Rising (edition 2014)

by Pierce Brown (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,9882652,841 (3.94)191
Member:virginiahomeschooler
Title:Red Rising
Authors:Pierce Brown (Author)
Info:Del Rey (2014), Edition: Reprint, 416 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:Audiobook, 2018CC

Work details

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Recently added byjenniferw88, jdpalmer5, wilky27, wisemetis, acapezza, Bswishe1, hluk, private library, LivaReader
  1. 51
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (wifilibrarian)
    wifilibrarian: Both feature themes of oppression, caste systems, large divides between have-nots and the haves. Televised young adults fighting.
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» See also 191 mentions

English (266)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (267)
Showing 1-5 of 266 (next | show all)
I was hoping the audio version would give me an hour's worth of exercise entertainment a day, but it seemed like yet another Hunger Game retread - which I liked, but once was enough.
  badube | Mar 6, 2019 |
Brilliant. So much so, that Red Rising takes it's rightful spot as my fourth 5-star book of this year. If only I would have known what brilliance was waiting for me, this would have been read much sooner. As my audio book neared its end, and my heart beat started to slow to a more normal rhythm, there was only one word left in my head: DAMN. That, and the need to find out what happens next.

I was instantly impressed at how easily I was immersed in this story. Darrow was a character that I could get behind, and one I understood. Loyal, loving, and full of a rage that is buried so deep down he doesn't even know how to address it anymore. Here was a character who accepted his lot in life because he felt he had to. Because he was too afraid to fight back. That is, until life gave him no choice. I tell you, his character ate at my heart. So much pain, so much agony, and yet such a brave soul.

Truthfully, it was the brutal, often gory, way this story was told that really won me over. I think too often in YA violence and gritty topics are swept under the rug. I've read many a Fantasy story where everything was solved in such a simple manner, ignoring the fact that rebellions are often drenched in blood, sweat and tears. This book didn't shy away from that. It was sad at times, dark at others, but full of lessons learned. I was so taken in by all of it. This read like a book that was aimed for at adults, and I ate that up.

Bravo. Simply, bravo. I have nothing but love for Red Rising. If this is what I can expect from Pierce Brown from now on, sign me up! I'll be waiting in line. ( )
  roses7184 | Feb 5, 2019 |
Actual rating: 2.5/5

I really wanted to like this book. After all, I did enjoy Hunger Games, even if I'm not enthralled with most YA. This book, however, seems really too much like a "dark" (Games of Thrones-level life-doesn't-matter darkness) Hunger Games.

The protagonist was not really that likable. He's 16, I know, but he's overly sure of himself and a borderline Gary Stu -- he is somehow super intelligent and can solve puzzles with ease, despite being a risk-taking driller with no formal education. He takes on the mantle of a revolution because his wife cared about it? It really was just hard to believe.

The Hunger Games section was pretty boring, I felt. I got the purpose of it, but after reading Hunger Games series, it really felt like a cheap clone. Proctors vs donors, a rigged game, etc., and the ending felt like a weird let down. A lot of the violence just felt like it was there to shock us and didn't really add much to the plot.

I'm not sure I'll continue with the next one, though I hear the story does get better. ( )
  esplanades | Jan 6, 2019 |
Even with a shelf full of unread books, I wanted to read this one as soon as we purchased it. That’s how excited I was to read and enjoy this story. Overall, the author did a fairly good job of taking us to his version of Mars. I felt a little overwhelmed for the first half of the book trying to understand all of the fictional terminology the author had scattered throughout. There were so many new terms that it seemed like I wasn’t reading the first book in a series. It felt like a skipped a book and just started halfway through the second book. Either way, I enjoyed the story and am excited to read the next book in the series. ( )
  mattstadtmueller | Jan 4, 2019 |
Powerful. This is probably the best word with which to define this surprising book: not so much for the story itself, or the motivations that drive the main character - these are tropes I've encountered before - but for the way the tale is told. The language is stark, almost pared down to essentials, and yet it manages to convey a great deal of emotion, even in its deceptively remote way.

Full review here: http://spaceandsorcery.blogspot.it/2014/02/red-rising-pierce-brown.html ( )
  SpaceandSorcery | Dec 25, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Pierce Brownprimary authorall editionscalculated
Reynolds, Tim GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
To Father, who taught me to walk
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I would have lived in peace. But my enemies brought me war.
Quotations
I was forged in the bowels of this hard world.
Then you must live for more.
"So this kid is what? A predestined Alexander? A Caesar? A Genghis? A Wiggin?" I ask. "This is slagging nonsense."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345539788, Hardcover)

Pierce Brown’s relentlessly entertaining debut channels the excitement of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.

“I live for the dream that my children will be born free,” she says. “That they will be what they like. That they will own the land their father gave them.”
 
“I live for you,” I say sadly.
 
Eo kisses my cheek. “Then you must live for more.”

 
Darrow is a miner and a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he digs all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of the planet livable for future generations. Darrow has never seen the sky.
 
Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better future for his children.
 
But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow and Reds like him are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.
 
Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow joins a resistance group in order to infiltrate the ruling class and destroy society from within. He will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies . . . even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:49 -0400)

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children. But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow and Reds like him, are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class. Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity's overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society's ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies ... even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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