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The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley…
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The Lottery and Other Stories (original 1949; edition 2005)

by Shirley Jackson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,730703,672 (4.04)186
The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. Together they demonstrate Jack son's remarkable range--from the hilarious to the truly horrible--and power as a storyteller.… (more)
Member:kristinhays
Title:The Lottery and Other Stories
Authors:Shirley Jackson
Info:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (2005), Edition: 2nd, Paperback, 320 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:books of 2010

Work details

The Lottery and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson (1949)

  1. 30
    What We Talk about When We Talk about Love by Raymond Carver (whitewavedarling)
    whitewavedarling: Similar styles and character types, though Jackson's stories are a bit more developed in regard to character and plot. Both authors have a tendency of working toward endings that leave a reader making final decisions instead of tying everything up fully with a more traditional ending.… (more)
  2. 10
    Death in Spring by Mercè Rodoreda (bluepiano)
    bluepiano: There's a likeness between 'The Lottery' and Rodoreda's novel inasmuch as both are about disquieting traditional rituals in isolated villages.The latter is of course longer & so more complex, and it's strikingly memorable.
  3. 10
    The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty by Eudora Welty (whitewavedarling)
    whitewavedarling: Welty and Jackson work with similar character types and have similar themes and writing styles. Other than those fans who enjoy Welty primarily for her station in Southern Lit., I'd say that fans of one writer will likely enjoy the short stories of the other.… (more)
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» See also 186 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 70 (next | show all)
This book was really frustrating to read. Every story just...didn't have a point? Every character felt emotionless and shallow. I read almost 300 pages and then decided to skip to The Lottery. Even that story, which is super famous, felt flat and characterless. I'm not a big fan of short stories to begin with, but I think that Jackson's writing truly shines in her novels. These stories just feel soulless. ( )
  LynnK. | Aug 4, 2020 |
A perfect collection of short stories. Among the collection my favourites are:
- After You, My Dear Alphonse (Social norms take time to change even for good people)
- Flower Garden (how racism creep in and take hold of people)
- Colloquy (short, sweet and I consider it lighthearted) ( )
  sami7 | Aug 3, 2020 |
Please note that I gave this book 3.5 stars, however, I rounded it up to 4 stars on Goodreads.

Although I liked this collection of short stories, I am not going to lie, I was pretty disappointed that they were not horror stories. And I am even puzzled at people claiming these are Gothic stories too.

Some of the stories I think danced towards that genre, and others were firmly not at all. I think if you ignore that aspect of the book and just focused on the stories you can see a pattern emerging though.

The first story (a young girl questioning a drunk man in her family's kitchen about the world) to the last story (a mother who realizes too late how not fair life is right before she is stoned to death) showcases women at different stages in their lives. Some of the women in this stories have hope, are clueless to their own internal prejudices against other children, women, men, and races. Some of them are just hoping for a nice life and to make someone a nice wife. Others are angry that their lives have not turned out quite in the way that they hoped.

So I would definitely read it if you want to read more of Shirley Jackson's works. But be warned, there's not much horror here if that's your primary reason for picking up these stories. ( )
  ObsidianBlue | Jul 1, 2020 |
Shirley Jackson is wonderful. Every one of these short stories is so masterfully written, small and medium-sized portraits of big-city and small-town incivility and anxiety and interpersonal slight so mundane but so universal. And a perfectly dark sense of humor. A lot of these stories focus on what life was like for women in the middle of the century, but don't seem at all foreign for it. I’ve read ‘We Have Always Lived in the Castle’ and ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ and this and I have enjoyed all three a lot. I’m going to read everything of hers I can. ( )
  matthewmcvickar | Jun 21, 2020 |
The one thing that really stands out about this collection of Shirley Jackson stories is this: the subtlety.

It's not over the top horror in any shape or fashion. Rather, it's regular folk doing regular things and as we peel back layers and layers to their surroundings or their individual psyches, everything twists subtly. The normal quickly becomes a twilight zone nightmare even if it's only a tiny little thing that's changed.

A dog caught killing chickens. *shiver* My goodness, that one killed me. Dead.

Some, like the Witch, was totally awesome and people of my generation would have just found it great fun, but I can see why the mommy freaked the hell out. Of course, the little kid was rocking hard to it and why wouldn't he?

I loved the Tooth. It was damn surreal and I was thinking along the lines of all the similar kinds of tales and novels to come after it. Body-hopping tales, indeed. :)

But more than that, I was really impressed and fascinated at the look into '40's racism, subtle or not, how badly women were treated and how badly they treated each other, and the general miasma of inhumanity everywhere.

Some tales were all about the unspoken silence that surrounded mental illness and the insane pressure to keep a lid on it and remain "normal". Things like this may not be completely horror as the genre but the tension was definitely all horror.

Shirly Jackson's stories were absolutely macabre, quite brilliant, and completely understated. It's all about looking through the darkened mirror, seeing our normal lives, living them, and then seeing just how horrible we really are. :)

Great stuff! ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Shirley Jacksonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Homes, A. M.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For my mother and father
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He was just tight enough and just familiar enough with the house to be able to go out into the kitchen alone, apparently to get ice, but actually to sober up a little; he was not quite enough a friend of the family to pass out on the living room couch.
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Disambiguation notice
PLEASE NOTE: This work is a COLLECTION of stories by Shirley Jackson that includes "The Lottery" and many other stories.  It is NOT to be used for stand-alone copies of "The Lottery" (a short story) or for briefer collections or compilations.  It has been printed in several editions, and I have kept with this work books that have the ISBN number of the collection even if only titled "The Lottery."
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The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. "Power and haunting," and "nights of unrest" were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson's lifetime, unites "The Lottery:" with twenty-four equally unusual stories. Together they demonstrate Jack son's remarkable range--from the hilarious to the truly horrible--and power as a storyteller.

No library descriptions found.

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Haiku summary
Unsettling stories
that make one think about the
monster in us all.
(passion4reading)

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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