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No Monkeys, No Chocolate

by Melissa Stewart, Allen Young (Author)

Other authors: Nicole Wong (Illustrator)

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8913247,761 (3.74)None
When you think of chocolate, you might think of a candy bar, a birthday cake, or a glass of chocolate milk. But where does chocolate come from? This book tells about the cocoa bean, which grows in the tropical rain forests and how the animals and other living things play an important part, even the monkeys.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
Enjoyable book about ecology, tying everything (multiple types of insects, reptiles, monkeys, plants, fungi) together to chocolate. My daughter also enjoyed the punning asides of the two "bookworms" at the bottom of the page.

One point: I noticed that the ants were drawn with four body segments -- specifically, two thoraxes. I pointed this out to my partner (a developmental biologist) who then explained to our 6yo that these were not normal ants; that they have a homeotic mutation. Yet another useful lesson from this book (albeit an unintentional one). ( )
  adaq | Dec 25, 2019 |
This is a great book that illustrates the way things in nature are connected and depend on each other. The book starts out with yummy chocolate. But you can't have chocolate without....cocoa beans, without... cocoa pods, without...midges, and it goes on like this until it gets to monkeys. Monkeys eat the goo inside the cocoa pods and help spread the seeds around for more trees to grow. Pods do not fall on their own, so the trees need animals to help spread their seeds around. At the end of the book, the author tells us that cocoa growers generally grow cocoa trees in tree farms with our other trees to cover up some of the harsh sun. These trees only produce pods from about 5% of the cocoa flowers. But when the cocoa trees grow in thinned out rain forests with shade, midges, lizards and coffin-fly maggots they grow more pods.
The book also gets into how flowers pollinate, leaves use the sun to create food, roots soak up water and nutrients from the soil.
I think this book is important because we humans often times do not understand how nature depends on nature to survive. If we understood this better, we might recognize the things we are doingt that destroy a single component in an ecosystem harm the entire planet and in turn, us. ( )
  Misskamm | May 19, 2019 |
This book breaks down all the steps necessary to harvest cocoa. It takes us through the process from eating chocolate chip cookies, to monkeys needing to spread the cocoa beans on the forest floor.
  Madelynnvallejo | Apr 10, 2018 |
This book tells the process of how chocolate is made in the style of going backwards through the steps. At each step, a necessary element in the process is pointed out until we get to the monkeys, which drop the seeds that allow more cocoa trees to grow. On every page, two worms comment on the content and make jokes. ( )
  mhathaway16 | Apr 2, 2018 |
This book is about making chocolate and how it works and all the parts that help make it happen. For example, they discuss where they grow the cocoa beans.
media: colored pencil ( )
  MichaelaGennaro | Feb 19, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Melissa Stewartprimary authorall editionscalculated
Young, AllenAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Wong, NicoleIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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When you think of chocolate, you might think of a candy bar, a birthday cake, or a glass of chocolate milk. But where does chocolate come from? This book tells about the cocoa bean, which grows in the tropical rain forests and how the animals and other living things play an important part, even the monkeys.

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