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The Twelve Caesars by Matthew Dennison
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The Twelve Caesars (edition 2001)

by Matthew Dennison (Author)

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1087166,695 (2.73)None
Member:Robinvk93
Title:The Twelve Caesars
Authors:Matthew Dennison (Author)
Info:Atlantic Books (2001), Edition: Main
Collections:Your library
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The Twelve Caesars: The Dramatic Lives of the Emperors of Rome by Matthew Dennison

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Joy's review: Actually, this may wind up sounding more like a rant than a review. This book is dreadful! Dennison cannot put together even a slightly coherent narrative and includes completely irrelevant things- for example, describing a painting of Claudius from the 1600's- for no discernible reason. He loves using long and obscure words, but them uses them in inappropriate contexts; he does not describe or define important terms like the meaning and levels of the various titles and offices of the Caesars. It's quite beyond me why this book was published. I made it through Nero (6 of the 12 Caesars) and managed to only learn one fact: that "Caligula" is a nickname meaning "Little Boots". A mash-up of undifferentiated rumors, facts, fiction that is almost completely unintelligible. ( )
  konastories | Jul 29, 2016 |
Really 3.5, as though it was an interesting read, it dragged at times and I had to take large breaks of time in between emperors. However, it did inspire me to make a pun "Reading about the 3 emperors in between the Claudio-Julians and the Flavians was 'Otho" boring". ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 4, 2015 |
Really 3.5, as though it was an interesting read, it dragged at times and I had to take large breaks of time in between emperors. However, it did inspire me to make a pun "Reading about the 3 emperors in between the Claudio-Julians and the Flavians was 'Otho" boring". ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 4, 2015 |
Really 3.5, as though it was an interesting read, it dragged at times and I had to take large breaks of time in between emperors. However, it did inspire me to make a pun "Reading about the 3 emperors in between the Claudio-Julians and the Flavians was 'Otho" boring". ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
Really 3.5, as though it was an interesting read, it dragged at times and I had to take large breaks of time in between emperors. However, it did inspire me to make a pun "Reading about the 3 emperors in between the Claudio-Julians and the Flavians was 'Otho" boring". ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 125002353X, Hardcover)

An unforgettable depiction of the Roman empire at the height of its power and reach, and an elegantly sensational retelling of the lives and times of the twelve Caesars

One of the them was a military genius, one murdered his mother and fiddled while Rome burned, another earned the nickname "sphincter artist". Six of their number were assassinated, two committed suicide—and five of them were elevated to the status of gods. They have come down to posterity as the "twelve Caesars"—Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus, and Domitian. Under their rule, from 49 BC to AD 96, Rome was transformed from a republic to an empire, whose model of regal autocracy would survive in the West for more than a thousand years.
 
Matthew Dennison offers a beautifully crafted sequence of colorful biographies of each emperor, triumphantly evoking the luxury, license, brutality, and sophistication of imperial Rome at its zenith. But as well as vividly recreating the lives, loves, and vices of this motley group of despots, psychopaths and perverts, he paints a portrait of an era of political and social revolution, of the bloody overthrow of a proud, five-hundred-year-old political system and its replacement by a dictatorship which, against all the odds, succeeded more convincingly than oligarchic democracy in governing a vast international landmass.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:21 -0400)

A retelling of the lives and times of the Roman emperors traces how their reigns marked Rome's shift from a republic to an influential empire, offering a sequence of biographies that offers insight into the political and social dynamics of each ruler's time.… (more)

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