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Cartwheel by Jennifer DuBois
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Cartwheel

by Jennifer DuBois

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3707743,022 (3.29)11
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I actually liked the book, and really enjoyed the character of Sebastian LeCompte, but wasn't too much of a fan on the ending; the writing nor the outcome. ( )
  thursbest | Jun 16, 2018 |
Cartwheel is a fictional adaption of the Amanda Knox story. Lily Hayes is an American 21-year-old living with an Argentinian couple as a foreign exchange student.
Jennifer duBois did a good job of writing from different perspectives. Lily's character development gave the novel the air of a psychological thriller. Her boyfriend was somewhat irritating but it may have been the narration from the audio version. ( )
  godmotherx5 | Apr 5, 2018 |
2 for (lack of) enjoyment, 4 for making me think. Not a fun or enjoyable read by any means, but interesting. I'm rounding down this time, though, as some of the style bugged me to no end. ( )
  gossamerchild88 | Mar 30, 2018 |
DNF. Skip this. Check out [b:Dangerous Girls|16074758|Dangerous Girls|Abigail Haas|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1356513050s/16074758.jpg|21869436] and [b:Abroad|4632388|Abroad|Katie Crouch|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1396822329s/4632388.jpg|27330958] instead. ( )
  majesdane | Aug 8, 2017 |
duBois is an intelligent writer, but ‘Cartwheel’ is a little uneven. At times it feels forced in both its character motivations and in its vocabulary. It doesn’t have the ease of ‘A Partial History of Lost Causes’, which I adored, or its depth. On the other hand, the characters she creates are great, and I liked how the novel explores American entitlement in the character of the blithe Lily Hayes. I loved chapter 4, when Lily first banters with Sebastien LeCompte, the rich young recluse, but I hated the novel’s resolution, and especially the last lines. Worthwhile reading from an author with a lot of promise, but falls short.

Quotes:
On enduring, loved this one:
“Sebastien would not fritter their last moments with indignity and anxiety, he decided. He would not paw at her and beg for her love and stroke her hair and say, What’s wrong, my love, what’s wrong, what’s wrong? He was his parent’s son, after all. If there was anything he could endure, it was solitude. If there was anything he could endure, it was abandonment. If there was anything he could endure, it was everything.”

On love:
“That’s how most boys were, in her experience; they could love with real tenderness, but their love was almost always aimed at a woman’s most generic qualities – her sweetness or softness or relative beauty, her archetypal feminine characteristics, whatever Freudian maternal shadows she cast – and so it was fungible, nonspecific. Empty, finally, even if it was technically real.”

On stoicism (or lack thereof):
“That’s all anybody wanted anyone to know about them – how hard it had all been, how valiantly they had tried, how much unseen credit they were due.”

And:
“Stoicism was not valued at Middlebury, where everyone wanted to endlessly talk and process and expurgate every little thing. If you hooked up with a boy he seemed to feel he owed you a real-time narration of his entire life, a live-blogging of his every emotional memory. If Sebastien LeCompte had been a Middlebury boy, he and Lily would already have agonized ceaselessly over the nature of their relationship, the question of monogamy, the issue of forward momentum, the prospect of looming distance and separation, the meaning of things, the meaningless of things. What a relief to be excused from all of that, anyway.” ( )
1 vote gbill | Oct 17, 2016 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812995864, Hardcover)

Written with the riveting storytelling and moral seriousness of authors like Emma Donoghue, Adam Johnson, Ann Patchett, and Curtis Sittenfeld, Cartwheel is a suspenseful and haunting novel of an American foreign exchange student arrested for murder, and a father trying to hold his family together.
 
When Lily Hayes arrives in Buenos Aires for her semester abroad, she is enchanted by everything she encounters: the colorful buildings, the street food, the handsome, elusive man next door. Her studious roommate Katy is a bit of a bore, but Lily didn’t come to Argentina to hang out with other Americans.
 
Five weeks later, Katy is found brutally murdered in their shared home, and Lily is the prime suspect. But who is Lily Hayes? It depends on who’s asking. As the case takes shape—revealing deceptions, secrets, and suspicious DNA—Lily appears alternately sinister and guileless through the eyes of those around her: the media, her family, the man who loves her and the man who seeks her conviction. With mordant wit and keen emotional insight, Cartwheel offers a prismatic investigation of the ways we decide what to see—and to believe—in one another and ourselves.
 
Jennifer duBois’s debut novel, A Partial History of Lost Causes, was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award for Debut Fiction and was honored by the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 program. In Cartwheel, duBois delivers a novel of propulsive psychological suspense and rare moral nuance. Who is Lily Hayes? What happened to her roommate? No two readers will agree. Cartwheel will keep you guessing until the final page, and its questions about how much we really know about ourselves will linger well beyond.

Advance praise for Cartwheel
 
Cartwheel is so gripping, so fantastically evocative, that I could not, would not, put it down. Jennifer duBois is a writer of thrilling psychological precision. She dares to pause a moment, digging into the mess of crime and accusation, culture and personality, the known and unknown, and coming up with a sensational novel of profound depth.”—Justin Torres, New York Times bestselling author of We the Animals

“Jennifer duBois’s Cartwheel seized my attention and held it in a white-knuckled grip until I found myself reluctantly and compulsively turning its final pages very late at night. It’s an addictive book that made me miss train stops and wouldn’t let me go to sleep until I’d read just one more chapter. And it’s so much more than just a ravenous page-turner—it’s a rumination on the bloodthirsty rubbernecking of the twenty-four-hour news cycle and the bewitching powers of social media, and a scalpel-sharp dissection of innocence abroad, a book charged with a refreshing anger, but always empathic. Jennifer duBois has captured the sleazy leer of lurid crime and somehow twisted it into a work of art.”—Benjamin Hale, author of The Evolution of Bruno Littlemore

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:01 -0400)

"When Lily Hayes arrives in Buenos Aires for her semester abroad, she is enchanted by everything she encounters: the colorful surroundings, the street food, the elusive guy next door. Her studious roommate Katy is a bit of a bore, but Lily didn't come to Argentina to hang out with other Americans. Five weeks later, Katy is found brutally murdered in their shared home, and Lily is the prime suspect. But who is Lily Hayes? It depends on who's asking. As the case takes shape--revealing deceptions, secrets, and suspicious DNA--Lily appears alternately sinister and guileless through the eyes of those around her. With mordant wit and keen emotional insight, Cartwheel offers a prismatic investigation of the ways we decide what to see--and to believe--in each other and ourselves"--… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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