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Walk Like a Buddha: Even if Your Boss Sucks, Your Ex Is Torturing You, and…

by Lodro Rinzler

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763288,092 (3.91)2
Since the summer of 2010, young Buddhist teacher Lodro Rinzler has been writing a popular advice column for the Huffington Postand the Interdependence Project called "What Would Sid Do?" ("Sid" being Lodro's nickname for Siddhartha Gautama-the prince who became the Buddha). Lodro's insightful and often funny answers to questions-ranging from how to forgive, to how to deal with a boss who's a bully, to whether or not it's OK to join Match.com-have made him the Dear Abby of the spiritual-but-not-religious crowd. This book gathers all of Lodro's Huffington Postcolumns, along with much as-yet-unpublished material, to provide a guide to life in a Q&A format that allows you to easily access wisdom for dealing with the myriad challenges of life-traditional challenges as well as uniquely modern ones related to things like social justice and social media.… (more)
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Some of my friends practice Buddhism, and I wanted to get a peek into what it was all about. I have to say I was very impressed with what I read in this book.
The book basically answers questions asked by people regarding their dilemmas in day-to-day life and how Buddha, if he were alive today, would deal with them. What Would Buddha Do?
The book really makes a lot of sense and offers a philosophy to live your life to the fullest and be happy.
The shambhala meditation technique, which has been highlighted in this book, opens your mind. You become mindful of what is happening right NOW. It asks you to accept all that you are feeling, be it good or bad, as a reality.
I have started doing meditation. I hope for something magical to happen in due course of time. ( )
  Govindap11 | Mar 21, 2020 |
IMO this book isn't about surviving with your shitty boss, or overcoming some anger issues or your ex wife. It's the author telling us about buddhism. I'm giving it a bad rating because the title was completely misleading for me. I checked the first couple of pages on Amazon and developed quite different expectations from it. To me it felt more like a zen, idealistic kind of thinking.

Sorry but I don't agree that it's possible to do any activity 100%. If you're eating you're 100% eating, doing some work then doing it 100% etc. That's because we are constantly bombarded with immediate tasks. You're driving and get an important call which needs to be taken that time itself. You can't focus 100% on either tasks so you need to multi-task. You're working on the PC, fixing a problem, answering your wife's constant questions while having your dinner. It's because there is way too much that needs to be done. You're not splitting your attention because you don't like doing one activity at a time. It's because the occasion demands it. If you want to enjoy what you're doing, and do your tasks one at a time then you'll have to drop some tasks. You need to sacrifice some immediate goals/dreams/pleasures.

Moreover, it feels like a grandmother kind of book to me. Most of the stuff mentioned in the book is idealistic thinking to be honest. It's along the lines of "where there is a will there is a way", "if you can see it you can do it" and all based on the urban belief that you can have it all. The only thing stopping you is you. Sorry no. I'll believe that when I experience it.

But the book does mention an important thing about meditation in the beginning (that you need to set a particular time else it'll be very difficult to bring it in the routine) and one point near the end about work (that if you feel stressed out with work and then switch your jobs you'll soon feel it again; the way out of it is to deal with your feelings while you're working). ( )
  MugenHere | Jul 12, 2015 |
This book reads easily, is appealing to the reader, interestingly written and very informative on the Buddhism teaching. ( )
  Wordreader | Apr 12, 2015 |
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Since the summer of 2010, young Buddhist teacher Lodro Rinzler has been writing a popular advice column for the Huffington Postand the Interdependence Project called "What Would Sid Do?" ("Sid" being Lodro's nickname for Siddhartha Gautama-the prince who became the Buddha). Lodro's insightful and often funny answers to questions-ranging from how to forgive, to how to deal with a boss who's a bully, to whether or not it's OK to join Match.com-have made him the Dear Abby of the spiritual-but-not-religious crowd. This book gathers all of Lodro's Huffington Postcolumns, along with much as-yet-unpublished material, to provide a guide to life in a Q&A format that allows you to easily access wisdom for dealing with the myriad challenges of life-traditional challenges as well as uniquely modern ones related to things like social justice and social media.

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