HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Walking with God through Pain and Suffering…
Loading...

Walking with God through Pain and Suffering (edition 2013)

by Timothy Keller (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
766821,879 (4.81)2
The problem of pain is a perennial one; and for those who undergo particular sufferings it can often be the largest obstacle for trusting in a good and loving God. If such a God exists, why is there so much suffering in the world? And how do we deal with it when it comes into our lives? In his fullest and most passionately argued book since 2008's bestseller The Reason For God, New York pastor and church planter Tim Keller brings his authoritative teaching, sensitivity to contemporary culture and pastoral heart to this pressing question, offering no easy answers but giving guidance, encouragement and inspiration.… (more)
Member:daddygluv
Title:Walking with God through Pain and Suffering
Authors:Timothy Keller (Author)
Info:Viking (2013), Edition: First Edition, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Walking with God through Pain and Suffering by Timothy Keller

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
I??d been told that this was the best Christian book on suffering and I certainly found that to be the case from my own reading. Wonderfully clear and pastorally minded. Very helpful and incisive. Highly recommended. ( )
  PGWilliams71 | Jan 31, 2021 |
The structure of the book was interesting. Keller starts with a discussion about comparative religion, atheism’s lack of resources for suffering the problem of evil, the theology of the cross and more. In doing so, Keller starts where I didn’t expect him to begin: in theology and philosophy. As a result, if I were myself suffering I might find it dry and not immediately helpful. In the Introduction, Keller does suggest that if you are in the midst of affliction that it may be best to jump straight to section 2 and 3. This would be wise but I wonder who does that (skip a third of a book). In many ways section 1 and 2 lay the foundation for the pastoral help in section 3. All Christian practice flows from theology, and the structure of Keller’s book demonstrates that.

Nevertheless, because the first section is intellectually weighty I’m not sure I would give this book to a friend who is in the midst of suffering as the first port of call.

I found Keller’s discussion of the problem of evil clear and penetrating. I’ve always wondered about the free will defense and Keller shows where it fits and why he finds it lacking. In the end Keller provides a number of biblical answers the the problem of senseless suffering but never goes so far as to suggest it removes all mystery and difficultly. The argument Keller favors most is that an all living and all powerful God would also be all wise and have reasons we might not see for allowing suffering. Just as a loving parent may allow their kids to suffer (through eating their vegetables or a vaccination needle) which the child may feels is totally unloving (yet it isn’t), so too God may have reasons to permit suffering that are totally consistent with his love and power. This argument is theologically and philosophically plausible but as Keller says, it doesn’t make the pain ho away. For that the only answer is the new creation which Jesus will one day bring.

I found this book intellectually stimulating, heart warming and practical. I find sometimes Keller’s sermonic style fails to translate to the written page (but I’m being pedantic).

There’s a couple of areas I had issues with, especially his treatment of trinity and the atonement on page 150. Keller says that there was a disruption in the trinity, a separation from the beloved, the loss of love at the cross between the father and the son. I believe Keller errs in this regard. In trying to display the immensity or the sons suffering, I fear Keller mistakes what happened at the cross. M’Cheyne whom Keller quotes does better when he says Jesus “was without any comforts of God—no feeling that God loved him...” (p. 150)

———

Keller suggests in his introduction that for those in the midst of adversity they may wish to read parts two and three of the book first. I would agree.

Part 1 and some sections of part 2 contain philosophical and theological evaluation of the problem of pain and the failure of other religions and the secular worldview to offer a livable theory of suffering. These sections are pitched at a highly educated audience, and every pastor will benefit from the worldview analysis and theological summaries of the doctrine of God’s sovereignty and suffering. While I enjoyed part 1, it made me question this is THE book on suffering that I would recommend to all people.

Part 3, on the other hand, is incredibly pastoral and accessible and would provide immediate help to those in the midst of adversity. Perhaps following Keller’s advice in the introduction, all readers should begin at Part 3, then read Part 2 and finish with Part 1, if they are able. That way the reader moves through the book from the pastoral to the philosophical rather than the other way around. My problem with the order of the book is that I think people who are suffering may give up before they get to the practical help the Christian faith offers. So too, inexperienced readers, may give up and miss out on part 3 because the suspect the entire book would be as dense as part 1.

I do think this is THE book on suffering that I would recommend to all people, but I would make sure I am encouraging them to start at part 3. ( )
  toby.neal | Jul 15, 2020 |
Introduction : the rumble of panic beneath everything -- PART I : UNDERSTANDING THE FURNACE -- The cultures of suffering -- The victory of Christianity -- The challenge to the secular -- The problem of evil. PART II : FACING THE FURNACE -- The challenge to faith -- The sovereignty of God -- The suffering of God -- The reason for suffering -- Learning to walk -- The varieties of suffering. PART III : WALKING WITH GOD IN THE FURNACE -- Walking -- Weeping -- Trusting -- Praying -- Thinking, thanking, loving -- Hoping.
  staylorlib | Aug 8, 2019 |
Best Books on pain and suffering I've read. ( )
  broreb | Sep 14, 2017 |

A first I didn't want to read this book. I have a prejudice against trendy-looking mega-church pastors, and Tim Keller sort of fits the stereotype, with his shaved head and earring. I was expecting some well worn Christian cliches, lots of Bible verses and little new in terms of insights and wisdom. Boy was I wrong. This was no hyped up how-to book. Walking with God through Pain and Suffering was a philosophical book of sorts, with sound reasoning, logic and grounded theology. I found myself highlighting a lot of sentences and entire paragraphs.

Here are some quotes that resonated with me:

We are so instinctively and profoundly self-centered that we don't believe we are.

The 'rage' at the dying of light' is our intuition that we were not meant for mortality, for the loss of love, or for the triumph of darkness. In order to help people face death and grief we often tell people that death is a perfectly natural part of life. But that asks them to repress a very right and profound human intuition- that we were not meant to simply go to dust.

Almost no one grows into greatness or finds God without suffering, without pain coming into our lives, like smelling salts to wake us up to all sorts of facts about life and our own hearts to which we were blind.

There were many other passages that were compelling. .. This is a book to hold onto, to read and to re-read, as an invaluable resource. For sufferers, people who work with sufferers and people who live with sufferers. And so it is for everyone.
















Just started this book, and so far I'm thrilled. It starts off w/a synopsis of different cultures' ways of dealing with suffering. Fascinates me to read how other peoples handle things.... how they understand the world and their purpose in it. We Westerners think our ways are the best. Lots of philosophical insights here. Looking forward to reading this one. ( )
  homeschoolmimzi | Nov 28, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
[Introduction] Suffering is everywhere, unavoidable, and its scope often overwhelms.
Suffering seems to destroy so many things that give life meaning that is may feel impossible to even go on.
[Epilogue] Let's summarize what we have learned. If we know the biblical theology of suffering and have our hearts and minds engaged by it, then when grief pain, and loss come, we will not be surprised, and can respond in the various ways laid out in Scripture.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The problem of pain is a perennial one; and for those who undergo particular sufferings it can often be the largest obstacle for trusting in a good and loving God. If such a God exists, why is there so much suffering in the world? And how do we deal with it when it comes into our lives? In his fullest and most passionately argued book since 2008's bestseller The Reason For God, New York pastor and church planter Tim Keller brings his authoritative teaching, sensitivity to contemporary culture and pastoral heart to this pressing question, offering no easy answers but giving guidance, encouragement and inspiration.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.81)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 6
4.5 3
5 30

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,373,647 books! | Top bar: Always visible