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Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (Volume 30)…
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Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (Volume 30) (Theory and History of Literature) (edition 1986)

by Gilles Deleuze (Author), Félix Guattari (Contributor)

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445256,482 (3.73)1
In this classic of critical thought, Deleuze and Guattari challenge conventional interpretations of Kafka's work. Instead of exploring preexisting categories or literary genres, they propose a concept of "minor literature"--the use of a major language that subverts it from within. Writing as a Jew in Prague, they contend, Kafka made German "take flight on a line of escape" and joyfully became a stranger within it. His work therefore serves as a model for understanding all critical language that must operate within the confines of the dominant language and culture.… (more)
Member:Joe.Olipo
Title:Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature (Volume 30) (Theory and History of Literature)
Authors:Gilles Deleuze (Author)
Other authors:Félix Guattari (Contributor)
Info:Univ Of Minnesota Press (1986), Edition: First Edition, 136 pages
Collections:Your library
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Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature by Gilles Deleuze

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The last essay I ever composed for grade concerned this book and the (very) Minor Literature of Isabel Allende. That strikes me as incomprehensible in this day and age, where everything is surface and seditious. I appreciate D's arguments about a subversion via a dominant language. I can't believe I read all those Allende novels. One shouldn't bother with my bastardizing Deleuze's coherent exposition. Youth. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
D&G say, hey you creeps, HERE is what kafka is good for. chuck out your hack interpretations of the man and get beyond the psycho-babble. From out of the laughter of the abyss Kafka's work is a rejection of complacency and failure; he was making way for a new way to see the world...

i like these guys


A LOT. ( )
  dagseoul | Mar 30, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gilles Deleuzeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Deleuze, Gillesmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Guattari, Félixmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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In this classic of critical thought, Deleuze and Guattari challenge conventional interpretations of Kafka's work. Instead of exploring preexisting categories or literary genres, they propose a concept of "minor literature"--the use of a major language that subverts it from within. Writing as a Jew in Prague, they contend, Kafka made German "take flight on a line of escape" and joyfully became a stranger within it. His work therefore serves as a model for understanding all critical language that must operate within the confines of the dominant language and culture.

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