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PRINCESS MARY'S GIFT BOOK by VARIOUS…
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PRINCESS MARY'S GIFT BOOK (edition 1914)

by VARIOUS CONTRIBUTORS presented by PRINCESS MARY

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Excerpt: ...it, was returning victorious. Having at the moment nothing else to do, I walked down to the river at a point where the water was deep and the banks were high. Here I climbed to the top of a pile of boulders, whence with my field-glasses I could sweep a great extent of plain which stretched away on the Zululand side till at length it merged into hills and bush. Presently I saw some of our natives marching homewards in a scattered and disorganised fashion, but evidently very proud of themselves, for they were waving their assegais and singing scraps of war-songs. A few minutes later, a mile or more away, I caught sight of a man running. Watching him through the glasses I noted three things: first, that he was tall; secondly, that he ran with extraordinary swiftness; and, thirdly, that he had something tied upon his back. It was evident, further, that he had good reason to run, since he was being hunted by a number of our Kaffirs, of whom more and more continually joined in the chase. From every side they poured down upon him, trying to cut him off and kill him, for as they got nearer I could see the assegais which they threw at him flash in the sunlight. Very soon I understood that the man was running with a definite object and to a definite point; he was trying to reach the river. I thought the sight very pitiful, this one poor creature being hunted to death by so many. Also I wondered why he did not free himself from the bundle on his back, and came to the conclusion that he must be a witch-doctor, and that the bundle contained his precious charms or medicines. This was while he was yet a long way off, but when he came nearer, within three or four hundred yards, of a sudden I caught the outline of his face against a good background, and knew it for that of Magepa. "My God " I said to myself, "it is old Magepa the Buck, and the bundle in the mat will be his grandson, Sinala " Yes, even then I felt certain that he was carrying the child upon his...… (more)
Member:nocky
Title:PRINCESS MARY'S GIFT BOOK
Authors:VARIOUS CONTRIBUTORS presented by PRINCESS MARY
Info:Hodder & Stoughton (1914), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
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Princess Mary's Gift Book by Countess of Harewood. Princess Royal Mary

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mary, Princess Royal, Countess of Harewood.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rackham, ArthurIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Excerpt: ...it, was returning victorious. Having at the moment nothing else to do, I walked down to the river at a point where the water was deep and the banks were high. Here I climbed to the top of a pile of boulders, whence with my field-glasses I could sweep a great extent of plain which stretched away on the Zululand side till at length it merged into hills and bush. Presently I saw some of our natives marching homewards in a scattered and disorganised fashion, but evidently very proud of themselves, for they were waving their assegais and singing scraps of war-songs. A few minutes later, a mile or more away, I caught sight of a man running. Watching him through the glasses I noted three things: first, that he was tall; secondly, that he ran with extraordinary swiftness; and, thirdly, that he had something tied upon his back. It was evident, further, that he had good reason to run, since he was being hunted by a number of our Kaffirs, of whom more and more continually joined in the chase. From every side they poured down upon him, trying to cut him off and kill him, for as they got nearer I could see the assegais which they threw at him flash in the sunlight. Very soon I understood that the man was running with a definite object and to a definite point; he was trying to reach the river. I thought the sight very pitiful, this one poor creature being hunted to death by so many. Also I wondered why he did not free himself from the bundle on his back, and came to the conclusion that he must be a witch-doctor, and that the bundle contained his precious charms or medicines. This was while he was yet a long way off, but when he came nearer, within three or four hundred yards, of a sudden I caught the outline of his face against a good background, and knew it for that of Magepa. "My God " I said to myself, "it is old Magepa the Buck, and the bundle in the mat will be his grandson, Sinala " Yes, even then I felt certain that he was carrying the child upon his...

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