HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

My Son and the Afterlife: Conversations from the Other Side

by Elisa Medhus

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
232818,592 (2.88)None
Dr. Elisa Medhus never believed in life after death. As an accomplished physician, she placed her faith in science. All of that changed after her son Erik took his own life and then reached out from the other side. Based on Medhus's wildly popular blog, Channeling Erik, "My Son and the Afterlife" provides answers to the most universal questions of being human. At once tragic and uplifting, Erik speaks from the other side with candor, wisdom, and depth as he describes his own experiences and provides new answers about the nature of souls, death, and the afterlife answers that have the potential to change our lives forever.… (more)
2014 (1) 2016 (1) 201403 (1) afterlife (1) an (1) death (1) dying (1) life after death (1) mind (1) non-fiction (1) R1 (1) spirit (1) spiritualism (1) suicide (1) to-read (1)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
This book tells of the communication between the author, a sceptical doctor, and her son, Erik, after he killed himself. This communication takes place with the aid of so-called spirit translators, first Kim and then Jamie.

Though Erik suffered from learning difficulties, Tourette´s syndrome and bipolar disorder, he was a wonderful, non-judgemental person who could talk to anyone and listened to people with compassion. He had a big heart; he was loving, kind, understanding and willing to sacrifice for others.

After his death Erik began to visit friends and family in their dreams, communicated with them and played pranks on them.

Erik explains “that spirits can move objects by altering the energy field in front of or behind them”.

Erik uses at times rather obscene language, as he did when on Earth.

Elisa asks about the life review, and Erik tells her that you get to feel the “emotions and impressions that other people perceived of you. You get to see yourself, what you´ve done … You see yourself through other people. --- You´re seeing through their eyes and feeling what they felt.”

There is sex and food on the other side, but it´s “not physical like that” – it´s different.

“There´s no conflict in Heaven or Home. So when the human dies and becomes a spirit again, the ease of life is sometimes shocking --.”

There is Peace, Unconditional love, and telepathy. You can go wherever you want to go.

Other things Erik loves in Heaven are time travel, going back into your past lives, and the Akashic Records. “I go into (the library) and all my past lives, my future lives, my now lives, my afterlife lives are all finely tuned.”

In the Akashic Records, or the library, when you look for information it´s like a never-ending page --- “You don´t have to manually unroll it. The information just comes to you.”

Erik has a “welcome home” cake, and is offered therapy, which he accepts.

They can manifest anything they want. They imagine what they want to eat, and it´s right there. They live where they want and how they want. (This fits in with Robert Monroe´s descriptions of the afterlife in his three books.) They don´t feel hot or cold, unless they want to. Thought creates reality instantly.

Erik says he´s got “a very high level of enlightenment”. He figures he has one more lifetime to go and that´s it.

He has a boat and his own place like a condo, a bachelor pad. They can “go out for pizza, have relationships, get married, it´s just the same.” They have “their life´s work as souls”, they travel and can have children. He has a leather couch and a big flat-screen television.

He informs us that anyone in spirit form knows what people on the earthly plane say. They eavesdrop on what we say, and on what we think and feel!

There are exciting chapters on death in general, on the life review, and on “the abilities of an untethered soul”.

Erik´s life work now in Heaven is “bringing to light the story of teen suicide” and teaching and healing. There are spirits like counsellors who help people look at their life plans. They help those with torn energy to mend and heal.

In the afterlife there are energy healing centres, particularly for those who first cross over, or those who died of a sudden illness or had traumatic lives or deaths.

There are different areas of the afterlife based on different intensities and kinds of energies (again as described by Robert Monroe).

Atheists have a “narrower vibration – a different vibrational afterlife”.

There are fascinating, deep chapters on souls, the nature of consciousness, time and space, matter and reality, love and fear, the nature of higher powers and “who are we and why are we here?”

The human spirit is never born, it´s just a piece of the whole. Prime Source has always existed. We are the parts and the whole, like a hologram.

The book was even better than I´d expected, and I can´t recommend it highly enough – I found it to be extremely important for those seeking metaphysical knowledge. ( )
  IonaS | Sep 5, 2016 |
There is so much I can say about this book but I want to keep it simple. The author mentioned several times that she was raised as an atheist and that she is a skeptic and a scientist. But she didn't discuss atheism in a way that indicated she had any productive understanding of it. And she didn't use any kind of scientific method or skeptical understanding to really evaluate what was happening.

In my opinion, the author missed a golden opportunity to really evaluate the issue of whether she could communicate with her son after his death. The medium presented her interactions with Erik in such a preposterous way that it would have been easy to put her abilities to the test. Instead, the author's goal seemed to be to negate her grief and to maintain some semblance of contact with her loved one.

That's fair enough and she is more than entitled to approach her despair in whatever way she chooses. But it is disingenuous to present this book as any kind of credible evidence for the afterlife. The very fact that she listed the M.D. title in her name on the book was also misleading because she didn't present any kind of medical knowledge that would be relevant to her son and the afterlife. I had high hopes that this would be a compelling book about an important topic and it fell utterly flat. ( )
  jimocracy | Apr 18, 2015 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Dr. Elisa Medhus never believed in life after death. As an accomplished physician, she placed her faith in science. All of that changed after her son Erik took his own life and then reached out from the other side. Based on Medhus's wildly popular blog, Channeling Erik, "My Son and the Afterlife" provides answers to the most universal questions of being human. At once tragic and uplifting, Erik speaks from the other side with candor, wisdom, and depth as he describes his own experiences and provides new answers about the nature of souls, death, and the afterlife answers that have the potential to change our lives forever.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (2.88)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 1
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 166,259,441 books! | Top bar: Always visible