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Papa Is a Poet: A Story About Robert Frost…
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Papa Is a Poet: A Story About Robert Frost (edition 2013)

by Natalie S. Bober (Author), Rebecca Gibbon (Illustrator)

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5414308,394 (4.5)None
Member:sabrinadixon123
Title:Papa Is a Poet: A Story About Robert Frost
Authors:Natalie S. Bober (Author)
Other authors:Rebecca Gibbon (Illustrator)
Info:Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (2013), 40 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Biography, Point of view, character traits, sequence of events, setting, poetry, similes, metaphors, picture book, childrens literature, non-fiction, Robert Frost, writers voice, determination

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Papa Is a Poet: A Story About Robert Frost by Natalie S. Bober

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Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This book was written from Robert Frost's daughters point of view. It talks about what it was like growing up with a father who loved to read and write and chased his dreams. It also shows the sequence of events in his life such as how he grew up and how he eventually became a successful poet. This gives students an idea of what it is like for poets and what it takes to write poetry. This could be used around a time of a poetry lesson. Students could be motivated to write their own short poem and pretend they are poets and even have a poetry slam where they share their poems. I think students would enjoy this book by how the descriptions and illustrations help bring the story to life. There are many similes and metaphors throughout the book and could be used to see if students could spot them out while they were reading. This is also a way to introduce students to another genre and help them understand what a biography is. I would use this book in a third grade class! ( )
  sabrinadixon123 | Oct 12, 2017 |
This is biography book for children told from Robert Frost daughters point of view. She shares the life of her father and the works of his poetry. This is a great book for children learning about poetry and the work it takes. This book has many good pictures that describe the time. ( )
  dsw021 | May 1, 2017 |
I really liked this book because the characters were so well developed and really gave the reader a sense of who Robert Frost was and how important his family was to him. For example, "Papa thought that any book worth reading twice was worth owning. So instead of buying deserts, we bought books." The book portrays a sense of family and the family's love for books and for one another. I also really liked the illustrations in this book. The drawings were extremely detailed yet simple at the same time giving the reader a sense of a simple but rich life that Robert Frost attempted to give his family. For example, the pictures of the family in the meadow display all the details of the flowers and the stream, but the colors are pale and simple. I think the main idea of this story was to show that Robert Frost was a family man and that he loved reading and writing poetry. ( )
  shax1 | Oct 23, 2016 |
Summary:
Frosts' daughter Lesley tells the story about their family and their lives as Frost pursues his dreams of writing poetry. She talks about how they moved from their home of New Hampshire to England for her father to write his poetry. They stayed there for a couple of years before returning to the states after her father had his work published by an American publisher, and saw no compensation for it.

Personal Reaction:
I enjoyed how the story is told from his daughters point of view, as his pursuit of happiness affected all of the family. It is a great example to ensure a child that whatever they desire to do in life, that there are hardships, but once they reached their goal, then all those hurdles are very well worth it.

Classroom Extension Ideas:
1. Play the game around the world. ( )
  StephiC | Apr 16, 2016 |
I enjoyed this book a lot. I think its a great way to teach students about poetry and about a person that wrote poetry. I liked the illustrations in this book and it was an easy read. I feel like students would love to read this and really look at the pictures. I think the cool part of this book was the author notes! Its a great tool to teach students and really interesting too. Overall, I love this book and will definitely get it for my classroom.
  Williewarren | Apr 15, 2016 |
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For my great-grandchildren, with love: Sam, Emily, and Hannah, Brianna, Gabbi, and Levi, and Sydney--N. S. B.
For my parents and all those who took the road less traveled--R. G.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805094075, Hardcover)

When Robert Frost was a child, his family thought he would grow up to be a baseball player. Instead, he became a poet. His life on a farm in New Hampshire inspired him to write “poetry that talked,” and today he is famous for his vivid descriptions of the rural life he loved so much. There was a time, though, when Frost had to struggle to get his poetry published. Told from the point of view of Lesley, Robert Frost’s oldest daughter, this is the story of how a lover of language found his voice.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:44 -0400)

"When Robert Frost was a child, his family thought he would grow up to be a baseball player. Instead, he became a poet. His life on a farm in New Hampshire inspired him to write 'poetry that talked,' and today he is famous for his vivid descriptions of the rural life he loved so much. There was a time, though, when Frost had to struggle to get his poetry published. Told from the point of view of Lesley, Robert Frost's oldest daughter, this is the story of how a lover of language found his voice"--… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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