HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Check out the Pride Celebration Treasure Hunt!
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by…
Loading...

Capital in the Twenty-First Century (edition 2014)

by Thomas Piketty, Arthur Goldhammer (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,024474,978 (4.22)56
Member:SuzyK222
Title:Capital in the Twenty-First Century
Authors:Thomas Piketty
Other authors:Arthur Goldhammer (Translator)
Info:Belknap Press (2014), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 696 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty

Recently added byFloyd3345, AndrewKnechel, private library, esplanades, jmgear, rahkan, EMoore1013, Soothscribe
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 56 mentions

English (38)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (3)  French (1)  Italian (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (47)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
Wealth tax, now. And other measures (isn't this what Keynes called for 70 years ago?).
Communities, Please Cooperate
MEOW Date: 13 Aug. 12,014 Holocene Era ( )
  FourFreedoms | May 17, 2019 |
Wealth tax, now. And other measures (isn't this what Keynes called for 70 years ago?).
Communities, Please Cooperate
MEOW Date: 13 Aug. 12,014 Holocene Era ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
This was really interesting, particularly the third part, which discusses the current and past distribution of income and capital ownership and the role of inheritance. I'm of course not knowledgeable enough to rate the content, but now I want to know more.
  brokensandals | Feb 7, 2019 |
Everything a non-expert needs to know is in the first chapter, but what a chapter! ( )
  jonsweitzerlamme | Nov 28, 2018 |
French economist Thomas Piketty begins his much-hyped opus with an account of the 2012 wildcat strike over low pay at the Marikana mine in South Africa and the resulting police violence that saw the shooting of 44 people. From there he launches into a sweeping account of the history of inequality over the last 200 years. The depth and volume of data contained in the nearly 600 pages here is overwhelming, and to someone like me who is not mathematically minded at the best of times, I often found my eyes glazing over at more and more percentage points and ratios. That said, Piketty attempts to write in a clear, straightforward way and mostly succeeds; I was introduced in this book to various tenets of economics such as the Gini coefficient, the Modigliani Triangle, the Pareto curve, and more besides.

Piketty's fundamental thesis can be summed up in a simple equation: r > g. That is to say, in a society where the rate of return on capital (land etc., but also assets and wealth such as stocks and bonds) exceeds income from growth, that society will tend towards greater inequality as wealth is concentrated in the hands of fewer and fewer people. That, Piketty argues, is the natural state of capitalism. In the 20th century, these effects were masked by shocks caused by two World Wars which created a temporary illusion of greater equality between capital and growth, but as we enter the 21st century, he argues (and demonstrates with mountains of graphs and data), "patrimonial capitalism", as seen at the end of the 19th century and during the Belle Epoque, is returning. These questions are of vital importance in a world increasingly dominated by neo-liberal economic policy and, in Europe, austerity measures which punish the poor.

His analysis focusses chiefly on France, the UK and the USA, as the countries with the longest and most detailed data to hand, but also discusses Germany, Scandinavia, Japan and others. I enjoyed his use of 19th century novels, particularly Austen and Balzac, as supporting points in his analysis of the economies of the time; in fact, Vautrin's cynical economic lecture in Balzac's "Père Goriot" forms something of a framing device in the central part of the book.

"The past devours the future," says Piketty. Capital - whether it be through inheritance or a rentier society in which wealth simply accumulates without work being done - is increasingly coming once again to dominate income from growth at levels not seen since before WW1. Piketty's utopian solution is a global annual progressive tax on capital; probably a wonderful idea and almost certainly impossible. But as a thought, it's an important contribution to a debate which desperately needs to be had. ( )
1 vote haarpsichord | Nov 5, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
The core message of this enormous and enormously important book can be delivered in a few lines: Left to its own devices, wealth inevitably tends to concentrate in capitalist economies. There is no “natural” mechanism inherent in the structure of such economies for inhibiting, much less reversing, that tendency. Only crises like war and depression, or political interventions like taxation (which, to the upper classes, would be a crisis), can do the trick. And Thomas Piketty has two centuries of data to prove his point.
added by eromsted | editBookforum, Doug Henwood (Apr 1, 2014)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Thomas Pikettyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goldhammer, ArthurTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bornstein, DeanDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Estany, ImmaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Galup, GracielaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Marfany, MartaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parés, NúriaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Has the adaptation

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"Social distinctions can be based only on common utility." -Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, article 1, 1789
Dedication
First words
On August 16, 2012, the South African police intervened in a labor conflict between workers at the Marikana platinum mine near Johannesburg and the mine's owners: the stockholders of Lonmin, Inc., based in London. (Chapter 1)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Book description
Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns and shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities. He argues, however, that the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth will generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values if political action is not taken. - from library description
Haiku summary
Inequality/It is the name of the game/Redistribution (waitingtoderail)

No descriptions found.

(see all 2 descriptions)

Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns and shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities. He argues, however, that the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth will generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values if political action is not taken.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.22)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 2
2.5 2
3 16
3.5 14
4 89
4.5 27
5 75

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,491,348 books! | Top bar: Always visible