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The Communist Manifesto (1848)

by Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels (Author)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
11,716100385 (3.45)155
Critically and textually up-to-date, this new edition of the classic translation (Samuel Moore, 1888) features an introduction and notes by the eminent Marx scholar David McLellan, prefaces written by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels subsequent to the original 1848 publication, and corrections of errors made in earlier versions. Regarded as one of the most influential political tracts ever written, The Communist Manifesto serves as the foundation document of the Marxist movement. This summary of the Marxist vision is an incisive account of the world-view Marx and Engels had evolved during their hectic intellectual and political collaboration of the previous few years.… (more)
  1. 50
    The German Ideology, including Theses on Feuerbach by Karl Marx (TomWaitsTables)
  2. 20
    All That Is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity by Marshall Berman (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: This is a book which explores the concept of modernity through the lens of works by such authors as Goethe, Baudelaire, Marx, through to the writers of St. Petersburg at a time when modernity seemed to be passing them by. It's a book written with undeniable passion, which swallows the reader whole (at least it did with me). I have never thought about texts like The Communist Manifesto in the same way since reading it.… (more)
  3. 10
    Dialectic of Enlightenment by Max Horkheimer (BeeQuiet)
    BeeQuiet: Before I explain why, I'd just like to add that this was co-authored by Adorno, though that doesn't seem to be logged here. I have only read the chapter 'The Culture Industry', but it provides excellent insight into the ways in which marxist theory has progressed. Following the failed student revolts in France, and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Frankfurt School was set up by way of exploring what had happened to allow such a grand false start. The Culture Industry in particular explores the way in which capitalism assimilates cultural forms, thereby robbing them of their revolutionary potential. I just love their writing style and hope others do to.… (more)
  4. 00
    Marx for Beginners by Rius (chwiggy)
    chwiggy: Marx for Beginners is a quick and easy way to get the gist of Marx' theories.
  5. 113
    The Capitalist Manifesto: The Historic, Economic and Philosophic Case for Laissez-Faire by Andrew Bernstein (mcaution)
    mcaution: Perfect antidote for Marx and the dialectic.
  6. 216
    Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal (original 1966 edition) by Ayn Rand (mcaution)
    mcaution: Proven time and again from an economic standpoint, Rand provides a much needed defense of capitalism from the philosophic.
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» See also 155 mentions

English (89)  Italian (4)  Spanish (3)  German (1)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (100)
Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)
The aim of communism is a proletarian utopia. This claimed utopia can be accomplished only by abolishing social classes through revolution. ( )
  Hany.Abdelmalek | Sep 16, 2020 |
The aim of communism is a proletarian utopia. This claimed utopia can be accomplished only by abolishing social classes through revolution. ( )
  Hany.Abdelmalek | Sep 16, 2020 |
Marx formulated his doctrine of class conflict in four decisive texts: The Communist Manifesto (1847-8), the Class Struggles in France (1850), the Eighteenth Brumaire (1852), and the Civil War in France (1871). All four are determined by French experience and French political thinking, yet they aim at something like a general theory of the state.

In the Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels were primarily concerned with the possibility of a revolution in Germany. Because Germany’s development was still not very advanced, they realized the revolution could only be a bourgeois one which would mean that it would bring the liberals to power. This awkward conclusion in a communist tract was qualified by asserting that the proletarian revolution would follow in the wake of the first upheaval, but it was difficult to explain this to those outside the narrow circle of the communist leadership. In fact, the events in Germany fell far short of accomplishing even the modest opening phase of the two-stage upheaval. After the failure of 1848, the Communist Manifesto had little impact on the day-to-day practices of the socialist movements. The flame of revolution was briefly reborn with the Paris Commune, but then was swiftly put aside. The ideas of the Manifesto, in particular the two-stage revolution, only became relevant in the context of Lenin’s efforts to direct a revolution in Russia which, like Germany in 1848, did not yet have a large proletariat to lead the revolution.

Though it was published early in 1848, the Manifesto had actually been drafted in the preceding autumn before the outbreak of revolution. Marx wrote the Communist Manifesto but made use of a draft prepared by Engels. Marx and Engels brought different emphases to the work. Engels makes considerable play with the ‘industrial revolution’ -- a concept which Marx had not yet begun to employ. In other respects too the tenor of his argument is a good deal more technocratic than that of the final version of the Manifesto. Marx was very much in the tradition of the French Revolution and stresses the catastrophic character of the process, while Engels is inclined to emphasize the liberating and progressive side: the emancipation of the productive forces already set in train by the ‘industrial revolution’ remains incomplete under capitalism because private property stands in the way. Communism represents its consummation, and the proletarian revolution is primarily envisaged as the act whereby the industrial revolution escapes from bourgeois control. At the risk of some schematization, the difference can be described as that between a socio-political concept oriented on French political experience, and a doctrine derived from the contemplation of industrial strains in early Victorian England.

The Manifesto presents far too sweeping a synthesis of philosophy and revolutionary strategy to be of use as a political textbook. [1961]
  GLArnold | Aug 20, 2020 |
Sounds good, doesn't work ( )
  JoTea | Jul 31, 2020 |
Before I begin, its important to say that I am neither Communist, nor Capitalist, nor Socialist, nor any other type of "economist". I do not believe in economics. Simply put, I am considered a "Radical" environmentalist. When I started reading this book (skipped to the actual manifesto, as the history has no real world implication for me), I went in with an open mind. About midway (when they began to talk about families), I started to get a very unnerving sense about me. I felt my stomach drop, and a deep sense of primeval hatred that the manifesto was touting as fact. I have read many books (including Mein Kampf), and felt many different feelings, but this one takes the cake. ( )
  Charles_Rayburn | Jul 16, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 89 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (120 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Marx, KarlAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Engels, FriedrichAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Bruhat, JeanIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fetscher, IringAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hobsbawm, Eric J.secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lahtinen, MikkoAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Linderborg, ÅsaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, SamuelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, Mark F.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tailleur, MichèleEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Taylor, A. J. P.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trotsky, LeonIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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To the memory of Raphael Samuel
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A specter is haunting Europe—the specter of Communism.
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Critically and textually up-to-date, this new edition of the classic translation (Samuel Moore, 1888) features an introduction and notes by the eminent Marx scholar David McLellan, prefaces written by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels subsequent to the original 1848 publication, and corrections of errors made in earlier versions. Regarded as one of the most influential political tracts ever written, The Communist Manifesto serves as the foundation document of the Marxist movement. This summary of the Marxist vision is an incisive account of the world-view Marx and Engels had evolved during their hectic intellectual and political collaboration of the previous few years.

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Penguin Australia

5 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140447571, 0141018933, 0143106260, 0141194898, 0451531841

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