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Novels and Social Writings: The People of…
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Novels and Social Writings: The People of the Abyss / The Road / The Iron…

by Jack London

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347547,446 (3.66)5

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Showing 5 of 5
Read Iron Heel only. A bit ponderous in the beginning because of all the socialist dialogue, but it picks up later and ended up being surprisingly enjoyable. Interesting as a near futuristic vision of social revolution, written as a fictional memoir by Avis Everhard, wife of a great socialist hero, with footnotes by a fictional historian writing ~700 years after the events she wrote about. ( )
  annasazi | Dec 19, 2017 |
Great. Essential reading - George Orwell's Down and Out and Wigan Pier were strongly influenced by The People of The Abyss; 1984 and other Dystopias were influenced by The Iron Heel, which was the first of the great 20th Century Dystopias. It's great to see Jack London the Socialist so well covered by Library of America. Most American anthologies and "complete" works simply ignore his socialism. ( )
  Geedge | May 28, 2015 |
Preferits: People from the Abyss i The Iron Heel ( )
  membrillu | Oct 30, 2009 |
Preferits: People from the Abyss i The Iron Heel ( )
  membrillu | Oct 30, 2009 |
The People of the Abyss - 3/5
The Road - 3/5
The Iron Heel - 0/5. Completely Unreadable
Martin Eden 3/5
John Barleycorn 2/5
Essays 0/5 ( )
  jhale | Oct 22, 2009 |
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This is an omnibus unique to the Library of America; therefore, all CK facts apply to this publication only.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0940450062, Hardcover)

Jack London is a powerful witness to the political upheavals of the twentieth century and their terrifying contradictions. By turns impoverished laborer, renegade adventurer, war correspondent in Mexico, dedicated socialist, and writer of enormous worldwide popularity, London dramatized his ideas about modern societies through incidents of adventure, romance, and brutal violence. "The Iron Heel," an astonishing political fantasy, anticipates a United States dominated by a capitalist police state and ripped apart by urban warfare. Personal experiences lie behind "The People of the Abyss," which vividly re-creates the slums of East London, and the exhilarating camaraderie of hobo gangs roaming across America in "The Road." "John Barleycorn" describes in harrowing terms London's struggles with alcoholism, while the intensely autobiographical novel "Martin Eden" foreshadows his own death at age forty.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:43 -0400)

The People of the Abyss - The Road - The Iron Heel - Martin Eden - John Barleycorn.

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