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Knowledge Representation: Logical,…
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Knowledge Representation: Logical, Philosophical, and Computational… (original 1999; edition 1999)

by John F. Sowa

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772266,876 (4.19)1
John Sowa integrates logic, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science into this study of knowledge and its various models and implementations. His definitive new book shows how techniques of artificial intelligence, database design, and object-oriented programming help make knowledge explicit in a form that computer systems can use. The first three chapters are devoted to logic, ontology, and computable models of reality. Remaining chapters apply theories to the analysis of problems stated in ordinary language, and their translation to computable form. The text is self-contained, with each new idea defined when first mentioned; all formalism is developed in the body of the text or summarized in an appendix. Knowledge Representation is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, as well as philosophy and linguistics students with some background in artificial intelligence or programming.… (more)
Member:BiblioCave
Title:Knowledge Representation: Logical, Philosophical, and Computational Foundations
Authors:John F. Sowa
Info:Brooks / Cole (1999), Edition: 1, Hard Cover, 594 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:Ontology, conceptual graph, knowledge, C.S.Pierce

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Knowledge Representation: Logical, Philosophical, and Computational Foundations by John F. Sowa (1999)

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John Sowa excels in relating logical truths and processes to history and ways people encode knowledge as information.

This book explores the limits of knowledge engineering in a way that stays close to fundamental ideas, rather than using the "buzzword" of the day. If you wish to think carefully about what you know and how you keep track of that information, this book is worth reading. ( )
  BiblioCave | Aug 10, 2020 |
In this book, John Sowa conveys diverse and effective insights within the field of knowledge representation (KR). The frameworks he employs are deeply grounded philosphically. (Sowa's previous work on conceptual structures reactivated and extended the innovative work of Charles Sanders Peirce integrating logic and graph theory.) The work reviewed here surveys a wide range of KR issues from basic ontology to agency and processes. Chapter 6, Knowledge Soup, is widely recognized for framing and addressing some of the more demanding, and largely unresolved, challenges in the field.

Throughout the book, issues are explored in a coherent, readable way. Of course, KR implies the use of relevant formalisms, and readers with some background in some AI research tradition will be better prepared to absorb the book's insights. However, for students and scholars looking for an integrated overview, Sowa makes a unique contribution. ( )
  ParseLee | Mar 22, 2008 |
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John Sowa integrates logic, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science into this study of knowledge and its various models and implementations. His definitive new book shows how techniques of artificial intelligence, database design, and object-oriented programming help make knowledge explicit in a form that computer systems can use. The first three chapters are devoted to logic, ontology, and computable models of reality. Remaining chapters apply theories to the analysis of problems stated in ordinary language, and their translation to computable form. The text is self-contained, with each new idea defined when first mentioned; all formalism is developed in the body of the text or summarized in an appendix. Knowledge Representation is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, as well as philosophy and linguistics students with some background in artificial intelligence or programming.

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