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Robert B. Parker's Cheap Shot by Ace Atkins
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Robert B. Parker's Cheap Shot

by Ace Atkins

Series: Spenser (43)

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2311770,940 (3.63)5

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Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
I am usually not a fan of continuing an author's character long after the author has died. You would think I would be as a big fan of comic books where this the norm. I just don't find that many books that can maintain the magic. Capture the voice. I don't know hoe Atkins has done it but reading these books is like reading Robert B. Parker. It is that seemless. With one exception. I think that Parker was slipping towards the end. Atkins has invigorated the series again. Reading these books is like meeting a friend you haven't seen in years. Atkins has a much better hold of the plot.

You are never going to read Spenser to figure out what the world is about. You read Spenser for the characters. They are all here. Hell, I even like Susan again. Great story. Fast read. Leaves you wanting more. A perfect recipe. ( )
  CSDaley | Mar 28, 2018 |
The Spenser novels by Atkins are every bit as good as the Parker books at the end if the latter' career. Nothing beats the Spenser novels of the 1970s and early 1980s, of course. But this was an exciting read and true to the characters. ( )
  dasam | Jul 25, 2017 |
Atkins continues the adventures of Spenser, Hawk, Zebulon Sixpack, and Susan Silverman. His plotting is more complex than Parker's, and while the characters are still recognizable, he takes a few liberties. He relies much less on choppy dialogue than Parker had come to do in his later novels. Arguably, he has freshened things up a bit. I enjoy reading these, but I miss the "old" Spenser too. He makes me want to go back to the beginning and watch it all unfold once more. ( )
  laytonwoman3rd | Jun 3, 2017 |
Not Parker but not bad! ( )
  AmberMcWilliams | Oct 2, 2016 |
Okay, I'd actually give it a 3.5 rating, as I think that Atkins did a great job capturing Parker's tone, particularly with Spenser himself. The 'mystery' wasn't especially complicated but, really, it's been years since I read any of the Spenser novels for the sleuthing involved. The series has always been character driven so it's nice to know the interplay between them will continue.

Now, there are some negatives for me but they are, for the most part, problems that I've had with the series in general for a long time. E.G., one character I've never really warmed up to, I must admit, is Susan Silverman but that's because of Parker's, and now Atkins', decision to make her absolutely friggin' perfect. In Every Way! The best therapist, the best lover, the dresser, etc. The constant references to the tiny sips of wine and the miniscule nibbles of food that she takes grew old a long time ago.

Secondly, I know that Spenser and 'the' Hawk are tough guys, but why oh why is every single bad guy absolutely no match for either of them? Ever? Apparently the entire underworld of Boston is inhabited by nothing but musclebound posers who just roll over whenever Spenser and Hawk flex their muscles. I don't know why Hawk even bothers to shave his head since he apparently could take on any punk in Boston without getting one hair out of place anyway! Well, there are actually a few tough bad guys in the city but Spenser has managed to become friends of a sort with them all, so he never has to worry about them, apparently.

Okay, I have one more complaint that is specific to this Atkins version of Boston. I'd just like to inform Ace that every neighborhood in the city isn't rundown and filled with boarded up storefronts as he seems to believe. That's it. ( )
1 vote LWhite54 | Feb 28, 2016 |
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For Bob and Joan.  Still here.
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Ace Atkins is the author; not Robert B. Parker.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0399161589, Hardcover)

The iconic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser returns in an outstanding new addition to the New York Times-bestselling series from author Ace Atkins.

Kinjo Heywood is one of the New England Patriots’ marquee players—a hard-nosed linebacker who’s earned his reputation as one of the toughest guys in the league. When off-field violence repeatedly lands Heywood in the news, his slick agent hires Spenser to find the men who he says have been harassing his client.

Heywood’s troubles seem to be tied to a nightclub shooting from two years earlier. But when Heywood’s nine-year-old son, Akira, is kidnapped, ransom demands are given, and a winding trail through Boston’s underworld begins, Spenser puts together his own all-star team of toughs. It will take both Hawk and Spenser’s protégé, Zebulon Sixkill, to watch Spenser’s back and return the child to the football star’s sprawling Chestnut Hill mansion. A controversial decision from Heywood only ups the ante as the clock winds down on Akira’s future.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:29 -0400)

"The iconic, tough-but-tender Boston PI Spenser returns in an outstanding new addition to the New York Times-bestselling series from author Ace Atkins. Kinjo Heywood is one of the New England Patriots' marquee players-a hard-nosed linebacker who's earned his reputation as one of the toughest guys in the league. When off-field violence repeatedly lands Heywood in the news, his slick agent hires Spenser to find the men who he says have been harassing his client. Heywood's troubles seem to be tied to a nightclub shooting from two years earlier. But when Heywood's nine-year-old son, Akira, is kidnapped, ransom demands are given, and a winding trail through Boston's underworld begins, Spenser puts together his own all-star team of toughs. It will take both Hawk and Spenser's prote;ge;, Zebulon Sixkill, to watch Spenser's back and return the child to the football star's sprawling Chestnut Hill mansion. A controversial decision from Heywood only ups the ante as the clock winds down on Akira's future. "--… (more)

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