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Krazy & Ignatz 1927-1928: by George Herriman
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Krazy & Ignatz 1927-1928: (original 2002; edition 2002)

by George Herriman

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191292,774 (4.35)None
Member:carminowe
Title:Krazy & Ignatz 1927-1928:
Authors:George Herriman
Info:Fantagraphics Books (2002), Edition: 1st Fantag, Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Tags:fiction, comics

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Krazy & Ignatz 1927-1928: "Love Letters in Ancient Brick" by George Herriman (2002)

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Compilation of classic newspaper strips from the late twenties.

"In Krazy Kat the poetry originated from a certain lyrical stubbornness in the author, who repeated his tale ad infinitum, varying it always but sticking to its theme. It was thanks only to this that the mouse's arrogance, the dog's unrewarded compassion, and the cat's desperate love could arrive at what many critics felt was a genuine state of poetry, an uninterrupted elegy based on sorrowing innocence."
Umberto Eco


Krazy Kat shouldn't really work, at least not beyond a few strips, as the 'plot' is so thin. Essentially, Krazy Kat loves Ignatz the mouse, who only wants to throw a brick at him, while Officer Pupp (as suggested by the name, a dog) tries to prevent this crime or punish the culprit.

While it shouldn't work, it does. The execution being so successful that when the Comics Journal, in 1999, listed the 100 best American comics and comic strips of the 20th century Herriman's creation was top of the pile.

As an illustrator Herriman approachable initially appears quite simplistic but look more closely and you can see how clever it is - full of visual jokes, subtle variations, the expert use of detail and, as importantly, no detail. Like the best art it repays repeated viewings. Herriman, the writer, is very playful - utilising a significant amount of alliteration, punning, deliberate mis-spellings and mis-understandings. It is fun and witty, and complements the visuals perfectly.

The sophistication of Herriman's creation can be seen in how he is able to work variations again and again on the same theme - we, the reader, know that the payoff is Ignatz throwing the brick and hitting Krazy on the head, and Krazy believing it to be a manifestation of love. (I'm surprised no-one has written an essay on the nature of Krazy and Ignatz's relationship as symbolic of domestic violence). Much of the enjoyment is in the anticipation of the brick, which may never be thrown or miss; sometimes Ignatz will get arrested even though he has done nothing, sometimes he gets away with his crime - this is something very human about the tripartite relationship the main characters are trapped in. And occasionally Herriman will produce a strip of poignant lyricism that transcends the media of the cartoon strip.

If you get a chance to visit Coconino Country then it is well worth a visit ( )
  Jargoneer | Feb 17, 2011 |
Compilation of classic newspaper strips from the late twenties.

"In Krazy Kat the poetry originated from a certain lyrical stubbornness in the author, who repeated his tale ad infinitum, varying it always but sticking to its theme. It was thanks only to this that the mouse's arrogance, the dog's unrewarded compassion, and the cat's desperate love could arrive at what many critics felt was a genuine state of poetry, an uninterrupted elegy based on sorrowing innocence."
Umberto Eco

Krazy Kat shouldn't really work, at least not beyond a few strips, as the 'plot' is so thin. Essentially, Krazy Kat loves Ignatz the mouse, who only wants to throw a brick at him, while Officer Pupp (as suggested by the name, a dog) tries to prevent this crime or punish the culprit.

While it shouldn't work, it does. The execution being so successful that when the Comics Journal, in 1999, listed the 100 best American comics and comic strips of the 20th century Herriman's creation was top of the pile.

As an illustrator Herriman approachable initially appears quite simplistic but look more closely and you can see how clever it is - full of visual jokes, subtle variations, the expert use of detail and, as importantly, no detail. Like the best art it repays repeated viewings. Herriman, the writer, is very playful - utilising a significant amount of alliteration, punning, deliberate mis-spellings and mis-understandings. It is fun and witty, and complements the visuals perfectly.

The sophistication of Herriman's creation can be seen in how he is able to work variations again and again on the same theme - we, the reader, know that the payoff is Ignatz throwing the brick and hitting Krazy on the head, and Krazy believing it to be a manifestation of love. (I'm surprised no-one has written an essay on the nature of Krazy and Ignatz's relationship as symbolic of domestic violence). Much of the enjoyment is in the anticipation of the brick, which may never be thrown or miss; sometimes Ignatz will get arrested even though he has done nothing, sometimes he gets away with his crime - this is something very human about the tripartite relationship the main characters are trapped in. And occasionally Herriman will produce a strip of poignant lyricism that transcends the media of the cartoon strip.

If you get a chance to visit Coconino Country then it is well worth a visit.
( )
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