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The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses…
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The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General… (original 2014; edition 2014)

by Pedro G. Ferreira (Author)

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1655113,405 (3.86)7
"At the core of Einstein's general theory of relativity are a set of equations that explain the relationship among gravity, space, and time--possibly the most perfect intellectual achievement of modern physics. For over a century, physicists have been exploring, debating, and at times neglecting Einstein's theory in their quest to uncover the history of the universe, the origin of time, and the evolution of solar systems, stars, and galaxies. In this sweeping narrative of science and culture, Pedro Ferreira explains the theory through the human drama surrounding it: the personal feuds and intellectual battles of the biggest names in twentieth-century physics, from Einstein and Eddington to Hawking and Penrose. We are in the midst of a momentous transformation in modern physics. As scientists look farther and more clearly into space than ever before, The Perfect Theory engagingly reveals the greater relevance of general relativity, showing us where it started, where it has led, and where it can still take us"--… (more)
Member:Samuel.Sotillo
Title:The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity
Authors:Pedro G. Ferreira (Author)
Info:Mariner Books (2018), 320 pages
Collections:Your library, EBooks
Rating:
Tags:Ebooks, British Writer, British Nonfiction, Nonfiction, Science, History, Quantum Physics

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The Perfect Theory: A Century of Geniuses and the Battle over General Relativity by Pedro G. Ferreira (2014)

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Showing 5 of 5
This is a very readable account of General Relativity and the people involved in developing it. ( )
  DLMorrese | Oct 14, 2016 |
A history of General Relativity. Enjoyed the first two thirds but the last section seems to lose its way, perhaps reflecting the current confused state of fundamental physics. ( )
  Matt_B | Jun 25, 2016 |
How did one elegant theory incite a scientific revolution?

Physicists have been exploring, debating, and questioning the general theory of relativity ever since Albert Einstein first presented it in 1915. Their work has uncovered a number of the universe’s more surprising secrets, and many believe further wonders remain hidden within the theory’s tangle of equations, waiting to be exposed. In this sweeping narrative of science and culture, astrophysicist Pedro Ferreira brings general relativity to life through the story of the brilliant physicists, mathematicians, and astronomers who have taken up its challenge. For these scientists, the theory has been both a treasure trove and an enigma, fueling a century of intellectual struggle and triumph..

Einstein’s theory, which explains the relationships among gravity, space, and time, is possibly the most perfect intellectual achievement of modern physics, yet studying it has always been a controversial endeavor. Relativists were the target of persecution in Hitler’s Germany, hounded in Stalin’s Russia, and disdained in 1950s America. Even today, PhD students are warned that specializing in general relativity will make them unemployable.

Despite these pitfalls, general relativity has flourished, delivering key insights into our understanding of the origin of time and the evolution of all the stars and galaxies in the cosmos. Its adherents have revealed what lies at the farthest reaches of the universe, shed light on the smallest scales of existence, and explained how the fabric of reality emerges. Dark matter, dark energy, black holes, and string theory are all progeny of Einstein’s theory.

We are in the midst of a momentous transformation in modern physics. As scientists look farther and more clearly into space than ever before, The Perfect Theory reveals the greater relevance of general relativity, showing us where it started, where it has led, and where it can still take us.

**
  GalenWiley | Apr 9, 2015 |
A readable, fascinating book, which traces the history of General Relativity from its origins with Einstein right up to the present day. In the course of the book it becomes clear that relativity must be part of a complete cosmological theory and united with quantum theory. The book is written for the lay-person, and without any mathematics, but one still feels a grasp of the underlining ideas. The book is particularly good in its pen-portraits of the scientists who have contributed over the nearly 100 years of General Relativity. One of my few criticisms of the book is that it does not mention the many practical applications of relativity on which we now depend (such as GPS navigation). Also, in the references, he spells Simon Mitton's name wrongly. ( )
  MarkHurn | Jun 27, 2014 |
Easily readable history of general relativity -- its initial splash in the 1910s and 1920s, its drift into comparative dormancy by the time of Einstein's death (1950s), and its later reinvigoration in association with work on black holes, quasars, pulsars, spacetime-singularity theorems, Hawking radiation, gravitational-wave detection, dark matter, dark energy, and quantum gravity. Even the current brouhaha over alleged black-hole "firewalls" is mentioned (in an endnote).
  fpagan | Mar 20, 2014 |
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Voor Gisa, Bruno en Mia
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Toen Arthur Eddington op 6 november 1919 de gemeenschappelijke vergadering van de Royal Society toesprak, haalde hij met zijn mededeling kalmpjes het heersende model van de zwaartekrachtfysica onderuit.
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