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Praying for Sheetrock: A Work of Nonfiction…
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Praying for Sheetrock: A Work of Nonfiction (edition 1992)

by Melissa Fay Greene (Author)

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441648,347 (3.86)14
Finalist for the 1991 National Book Award and a New York Times Notable book, Praying for Sheetrock is the story of McIntosh County, a small, isolated, and lovely place on the flowery coast of Georgia--and a county where, in the 1970s, the white sheriff still wielded all the power, controlling everything and everybody. Somehow the sweeping changes of the civil rights movement managed to bypass McIntosh entirely. It took one uneducated, unemployed black man, Thurnell Alston, to challenge the sheriff and his courthouse gang--and to change the way of life in this community forever. "An inspiring and absorbing account of the struggle for human dignity and racial equality" (Coretta Scott King)… (more)
Member:kmize128
Title:Praying for Sheetrock: A Work of Nonfiction
Authors:Melissa Fay Greene (Author)
Info:Ballantine Books (1992), Edition: 1St Edition, 338 pages
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Praying for Sheetrock: A Work of Nonfiction by Melissa Fay Greene

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» See also 14 mentions

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Utterly fascinating look into the world of the civil rights movement in rural Georgia. I learned so much about this history you don't learn in school and how long and deep the roots are (good and bad) in this region. ( )
  WellReadSoutherner | Apr 6, 2022 |
I've kept this book only because it is about my hometown. The author seems to have been one of those persons who are sure they are right and incapable of appreciating or actually understanding anybody of a different background or viewpoint. I paricularly resent her supercilious treatment of a lady (not related to me).
  cstebbins | Oct 21, 2021 |
Interesting read to learn about the history of rural Georgia. Needed a much more serious edit in the last half. Is this a New Classic? No. ( )
  deldevries | Apr 6, 2017 |
Greene tells the true story of a corrupt sheriff and an awakening African American community in McIntosh County, Georgia. What is so surprising is that the incidents occurred not in the 50s or during the traditional civil rights era but later, from the mid- to late-seventies and well into the eighties. The sheriff had such a hold on the community that the blacks who lived there, a majority of the population, accepted things as they were until one man stood up to it. The story is complicated and hard to relate in just a few sentences. One of the things I really enjoyed about the book was the attention to detail and description. Greene has done an excellent job of catching the essence of so many small communities in rural Georgia. Most of them are not corrupt, and that is not what I mean - it's the descriptions of the towns, the land, and the people. ( )
  hobbitprincess | Sep 30, 2012 |
This is one of the finest works of narrative nonfiction I've ever read. Anyone considering journalism or nonfiction writing as a career should read it. Melissa Fay Greene tells the story of McIntosh County, Ga., a place she obviously knows well, with the perspective of an outsider but the affection of a local. It's a tough story, about civil rights coming to this Southern community at long last and the flawed but brave people who led the fight. ( )
  keywestnan | Jul 10, 2008 |
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Epigraph
McIntosh County is pretty country and it's got some nice people, but it's the most different place I've ever been to in my life.
--Harry Coursey, GBI Specical Agent, Savannah
Dedication
To my mother, Rosalyn Pollock Greene
To my husband's mother and father, Ruth and Howard Samuel
To my father of blessed memory, Gerald A. Greene
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Two trucks collided on the crisscrossed highways in the small hours of the morning when the mist was thick.
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Finalist for the 1991 National Book Award and a New York Times Notable book, Praying for Sheetrock is the story of McIntosh County, a small, isolated, and lovely place on the flowery coast of Georgia--and a county where, in the 1970s, the white sheriff still wielded all the power, controlling everything and everybody. Somehow the sweeping changes of the civil rights movement managed to bypass McIntosh entirely. It took one uneducated, unemployed black man, Thurnell Alston, to challenge the sheriff and his courthouse gang--and to change the way of life in this community forever. "An inspiring and absorbing account of the struggle for human dignity and racial equality" (Coretta Scott King)

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