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Vuonna 1984 by George Orwell
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Vuonna 1984 (original 1949; edition 1971)

by George Orwell, Oiva Talvitie

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
62,03110009 (4.24)1744
Member:Emvignya
Title:Vuonna 1984
Authors:George Orwell
Other authors:Oiva Talvitie
Info:Porvoo&Helsinki WS 1971
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

1984 by George Orwell (1949)

  1. 877
    Animal Farm by George Orwell (JGKC, haraldo)
  2. 802
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (nathanm, chrisharpe, MinaKelly, li33ieg, haraldo, Ludi_Ling, Morteana, Waldstein)
    li33ieg: 1984, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451: 3 essential titles that remind us of the need to keep our individual souls pure.
    Ludi_Ling: Really, the one cannot be mentioned without the other. Actually, apart from the dystopian subject matter, they are very different stories, but serve as a great counterpoint to one another.
    Waldstein: It's essential to read Huxley's and Orwell's books together. Both present the ultimate version of the totalitarian state, but there the similarities end. While Orwell argues in favour of hate and fear, Huxley suggests that pleasure and drugs would be far more effective as controlling forces. Who was the more prescient prophet? That's what every reader should decide for his- or herself.… (more)
  3. 726
    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (readafew, hipdeep, Booksloth, rosylibrarian, moietmoi, haraldo, BookshelfMonstrosity)
    readafew: Both books are about keeping the people in control and ignorant.
    hipdeep: 1984 is scary like a horror movie. Fahrenheit 451 is scary like the news. So - do you want to see something really scary?
    BookshelfMonstrosity: A man's romance-inspired defiance of menacing, repressive governments in bleak futures are the themes of these compelling novels. Control of language and monitors that both broadcast to and spy on people are key motifs. Both are dramatic, haunting, and thought-provoking.… (more)
  4. 381
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (citygirl, cflorente, wosret, norabelle414, readingwolverine)
  5. 382
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (wosret, Anonymous user)
  6. 271
    We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (hippietrail, BGP, soylentgreen23, roby72, timoroso, MEStaton, Anonymous user, Sylak)
    hippietrail: The original dystopian novel from which both Huxley and Orwell drew inspiration.
    timoroso: Zamyatin's "We" was not just a precursor of "Nineteen Eighty-Four" but the work Orwell took as a model for his own book.
    Sylak: A great influence in the writing of his own book.
  7. 3913
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding (vegetarianflautist, avid_reader25)
  8. 224
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (readerbabe1984)
  9. 192
    V for Vendetta by Alan Moore (aethercowboy)
    aethercowboy: The world of V for Vendetta is very reminiscent of the world of 1984.
  10. 216
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (cflorente, readerbabe1984)
  11. 111
    Brave New World & Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley (thebookpile)
  12. 90
    Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler (BGP, ivan.frade)
    ivan.frade: Both books talk about revolution and the people, individual rights vs. common wellness. "darkness at noon" is pretty similar to 1984, without the especulation/science-fiction ingredient.
  13. 91
    Kallocain by Karin Boye (andejons, Anonymous user)
    andejons: The totalitarian state works very similar in both books, but the control in Kallocain seems more plausible, which makes it more frightening.
  14. 91
    Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley (pyrocow)
  15. 102
    Little Brother by Cory Doctorow (infiniteletters, suzanney, JFDR)
    JFDR: 1984's Big Brother is Little Brother's namesake.
  16. 40
    The Archivist's Story by Travis Holland (catherinestead)
    catherinestead: Two very powerful stories of what happens when a very small cog in the machine of a dictatorship decides not to turn anymore.
  17. 40
    Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov (BGP)
  18. 40
    The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: If you read only one other dystopian SF story, make it this one.
  19. 30
    Swastika Night by Katharine Burdekin (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Huxley and Zamyatin are practically the canon recommendations for this work, so much so that they hardly need to be mentioned, let alone mentioned again.. Therefore, let me instead recommend a lesser-known work that likewise influenced Orwell's work: Burdekin's dystopian future-history, Swastika Night… (more)
  20. 41
    The Circle by Dave Eggers (JuliaMaria)

(see all 60 recommendations)

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Showing 1-5 of 922 (next | show all)
1984 by George Orwell Winston Smith, lives in a land called Oceania. Here information is manipulated, and people’s actions are controlled and watched through global two-way televisions and an extensive spy network. Those who break rules either vanish or are ruthlessly punished. Smith tries to rebel by becoming more private, taking a lover, and joining a resistance organization. ( )
  rena75 | Jun 25, 2019 |
I had already decided to read this before all the flap about government spying came out. I figured it was just time to re-read this classic. I remembered some from having read before, but all the political commentary regarding the powerful and the vast unwashed, proles in this book, I hadn't remembered. Unfortunately, while we've yet to achieve the level of official brutality envisioned in this book, the basics of a small percent keeping the "lower classes" in their thrall isn't a whole lot different from what we're seeing in the modern U.S.

In part I read this book when I did as a prelude to reading Murakami's latest, 1Q84. Soon, I'll see if there are cross references which made the re-reading of Orwell's masterpiece a worthwhile step to Murakami, who is probably my favorite author ever.

Update:
Nope, no reason to read this before reading Murakami's 1Q84. I think there was only one 1984 reference it this whole book. One should, however, most definitely read both.
( )
  lgpiper | Jun 21, 2019 |
Room 101, a room of all your fears, brilliant concept. Really enjoyable read. ( )
  ryndean | Jun 11, 2019 |
It's obviously well written, but I didn't actually enjoy it. It's a miserable book, really. It's like North Korea meets Hitler complete with torture. How can anybody "enjoy" that? It's amazing how much I didn't remember from reading it a couple of decades ago... ( )
  Amelia1989 | Jun 10, 2019 |
Another "must read" ( )
  expatscot | Jun 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 922 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (34 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Orwell, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Audiberti, AmélieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baldini, GabrieleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiaruttini, AldoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davids, TinkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davison, PeterIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Facetti, GermanoCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frank Kelly freasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fromm, ErichAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holmberg, NilsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jacoby, MelissaCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kool, Halbo C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pimlott, BenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prebble, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pynchon, ThomasForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Qoserî, Salih AgirTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Talvitie, OivaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vos, PeterIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wagenseil, KurtTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walter, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warburton, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
1984 (1956IMDb)
1984 (2009IMDb)
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.
Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him.
Quotations
"BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU."
"WAR IS PEACE. SLAVERY IS FREEDOM. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH."
Freedom is the freedom to know that two plus two make four.
Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.
In philosophy, or religion, or ethics, or politics, two plus two might make five, but when one was designing a fun or an airplane they had to make four.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
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Canonical DDC/MDS
Book description
Arguably the 20th-century's most famous novel, 1984 is a dystopian study of political tyranny, mind control, paranoia and secret mass surveillance.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0451524934, Mass Market Paperback)

Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell's nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff's attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell's prescience of modern life--the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language--and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:05 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Portrays life in a future time when a totalitarian government watches over all citizens and directs all activities.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 46 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

6 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014118776X, 1405807040, 0141036141, 0141191201, 0143566490, 0141391707

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