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Nineteen Eighty-Four, Centennial Edition by…
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Nineteen Eighty-Four, Centennial Edition (original 1961; edition 2003)

by George Orwell, Erich Fromm (Afterword), Thomas Pynchon (Foreword), Daniel Lagin (Designer)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
82,964128510 (4.23)5 / 2005
Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick
With extraordinary relevance and renewed popularity, George Orwell's 1984 takes on new life in this edition.
"Orwell saw, to his credit, that the act of falsifying reality is only secondarily a way of changing perceptions. It is, above all, a way of asserting power."The New Yorker

In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.
Lionel Trilling said of Orwell's masterpiece, "1984 is a profound, terrifying, and wholly fascinating book. It is a fantasy of the political future, and like any such fantasy, serves its author as a magnifying device for an examination of the present." Though the year 1984 now exists in the past, Orwell's novel remains an urgent call for the individual willing to speak truth to power.
… (more)
Member:jborovac
Title:Nineteen Eighty-Four, Centennial Edition
Authors:George Orwell
Other authors:Erich Fromm (Afterword), Thomas Pynchon (Foreword), Daniel Lagin (Designer)
Info:Plume (2003), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

1984 by George Orwell (1961)

  1. 852
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (nathanm, chrisharpe, MinaKelly, li33ieg, hpfilho, Ludi_Ling, Morteana, Anonymous user)
    li33ieg: 1984, Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451: 3 essential titles that remind us of the need to keep our individual souls pure.
    Ludi_Ling: Really, the one cannot be mentioned without the other. Actually, apart from the dystopian subject matter, they are very different stories, but serve as a great counterpoint to one another.
    Anonymous user: It's essential to read Huxley's and Orwell's books together. Both present the ultimate version of the totalitarian state, but there the similarities end. While Orwell argues in favour of hate and fear, Huxley suggests that pleasure and drugs would be far more effective as controlling forces. Who was the more prescient prophet? That's what every reader should decide for him- or herself.… (more)
  2. 877
    Animal Farm by George Orwell (JGKC, hpfilho)
  3. 746
    Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (readafew, hipdeep, Booksloth, rosylibrarian, moietmoi, hpfilho, BookshelfMonstrosity)
    readafew: Both books are about keeping the people in control and ignorant.
    hipdeep: 1984 is scary like a horror movie. Fahrenheit 451 is scary like the news. So - do you want to see something really scary?
    BookshelfMonstrosity: A man's romance-inspired defiance of menacing, repressive governments in bleak futures are the themes of these compelling novels. Control of language and monitors that both broadcast to and spy on people are key motifs. Both are dramatic, haunting, and thought-provoking.… (more)
  4. 401
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (citygirl, cflorente, wosret, norabelle414, readingwolverine)
  5. 362
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (wosret, Anonymous user)
  6. 4014
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding (vegetarianflautist, avid_reader25)
  7. 282
    We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (hippietrail, BGP, soylentgreen23, roby72, timoroso, MEStaton, Anonymous user, Sylak, humashaikh)
    hippietrail: The original dystopian novel from which both Huxley and Orwell drew inspiration.
    timoroso: Zamyatin's "We" was not just a precursor of "Nineteen Eighty-Four" but the work Orwell took as a model for his own book.
    Sylak: A great influence in the writing of his own book.
  8. 215
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey (readerbabe1984)
  9. 172
    V for Vendetta by Alan Moore (aethercowboy)
    aethercowboy: The world of V for Vendetta is very reminiscent of the world of 1984.
  10. 197
    The Giver by Lois Lowry (cflorente, readerbabe1984)
  11. 122
    Brave New World & Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley (thebookpile)
  12. 91
    Kallocain by Karin Boye (andejons, Anonymous user)
    andejons: The totalitarian state works very similar in both books, but the control in Kallocain seems more plausible, which makes it more frightening.
  13. 80
    Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler (BGP, ivan.frade)
    ivan.frade: Both books talk about revolution and the people, individual rights vs. common wellness. "darkness at noon" is pretty similar to 1984, without the especulation/science-fiction ingredient.
  14. 92
    Little Brother by Cory Doctorow (infiniteletters, suzanney, JFDR)
    JFDR: 1984's Big Brother is Little Brother's namesake.
  15. 30
    The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: If you read only one other dystopian SF story, make it this one.
  16. 41
    The Circle by Dave Eggers (JuliaMaria)
  17. 30
    The Archivist's Story by Travis Holland (Eat_Read_Knit)
    Eat_Read_Knit: Two very powerful stories of what happens when a very small cog in the machine of a dictatorship decides not to turn anymore.
  18. 30
    Heart of a Dog by Mikhail Bulgakov (BGP)
  19. 30
    Swastika Night by Katharine Burdekin (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Huxley and Zamyatin are practically the canon recommendations for this work, so much so that they hardly need to be mentioned, let alone mentioned again.. Therefore, let me instead recommend a lesser-known work that likewise influenced Orwell's work: Burdekin's dystopian future-history, Swastika Night… (more)
  20. 20
    Love Among the Ruins by Evelyn Waugh (KayCliff)

(see all 59 recommendations)

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Showing 1-5 of 1175 (next | show all)
This is a book that i used for typing practice over at TypeLit.

It's rather an enjoyable way to read a book, while at the same time being incredibly useful in improving ones typing.

Quite a good read, but so dystopian, and the ending wasn't what i was hoping for. It does remind me of just how lucky i am to live in a country where we have the freedoms that we do, and how important it is to ensure those freedoms aren't eroded by anyone. It is up to all of us to ensure that those freedoms are exercised sensibly, with consideration of other sentient beings and, ultimately, that the boundaries of those freedoms are continuously tested and where possible, extended.

So well worth a read or a type for everyone.

Not the easiest of books to type as it has sooooo many capitalised words, uncommon words, and also words that just don't exist outside of this book: which while adding up to great typing practice, can be really frustrating at times. ( )
  5t4n5 | Jul 9, 2024 |
The most banned book of all time, and it's easy to see why. Now, when we need it the most, you will not find it in many school and public libraries in this country. ( )
  Octavia78 | Jul 6, 2024 |
I enjoyed this book for the some of the same reasons as most who have read and enjoyed this book: we're always being watched even when we think we aren't. What rings so true about this book is the metaphor portrayed by Big Brother. Although some things in this book may mirror our reality, other aspects of the book I find to be especially interesting. Love, betrayal, fear, surveillance: these are all themes found in this book and that's what I most appreciate about this book. I highly recommend this book! ( )
  prebs29 | Jul 6, 2024 |
I did not enjoy this book. It was a bleak slice of life in a totalitarian, Commmunist Russia-esque era world where there’s no hope, only more bleakness. It was repetitive, giving the same explanations over and over again. The only time when it got interesting was when it seemed like the plot was moving toward something, more than two-thirds of the way through the book when Winston might have found the Brotherhood, but then just went back to bleakness.

The worst part was when Winston read chapters of the Goldstein book and we, as the reader, had to read the chapters as well. A summary would have sufficed to get the point across, but it literally explained the world as we already knew it to be. And then the appendix literally explained it all again in finite detail.

I understand how this book is meant to be a warning to humanity about willful ignorance and how easy people are to manipulate and “sheep-ify”. I also recognize that at the time it was created, it was considered a literary masterpiece. I, however, much preferred Orwell’s “Animal Farm.” Although it was significantly shorter, it much more clearly exemplified the message he was trying to get across, and the plot moved. Perhaps the lack of a moving plot was Orwell’s way of trying to illustrate something about how time stands still and there’s just repetitive sameness in such dystopian world as “1984.” If so I can appreciate that… but it doesn’t make me enjoy the story any more. ( )
  H4ppyN3rd | Jun 28, 2024 |
Very impressed with the mind of George Orwell. He created a disturbingly detailed dystopia. The writing was great, I was hooked from start to finish. Can’t believe it was written in 1949. Feel like older books are better written, or probably just survivorship bias. Anyways, the ending for Winston was sad ( )
  heolinhdam | Jun 25, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 1175 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (109 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Orwell, Georgeprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Audiberti, AmélieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Čepliejus, Virgilijussecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baldini, GabrieleTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Baulenas, Lluís-Antonsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burton, JonathanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiaruttini, AldoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Corr, ChristopherCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davids, TinkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davison, Peter HobleyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fromm, ErichAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Holmberg, NilsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kilpi, Tuomassecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kool, Halbo C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manferlotti, StefanoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mattila, RaijaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Noble, PeterNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pimlott, BenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prebble, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pynchon, ThomasForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Qoserî, Salih AgirTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rusbridger, AlanIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shafak, ElifIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Talvitie, OivaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verhoeven, WilAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vos, PeterIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wagenseil, KurtTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walter, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warburton, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
וולק, ארזTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.
Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him.
Quotations
"BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU."
"WAR IS PEACE. SLAVERY IS FREEDOM. IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH."
Freedom is the freedom to know that two plus two make four.
Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.
In philosophy, or religion, or ethics, or politics, two plus two might make five, but when one was designing a fun or an airplane they had to make four.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Per WorldCat, ISBN 0451524934 is for the book, not the video.
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Classic Literature. Fiction. Literature. HTML:A PBS Great American Read Top 100 Pick
With extraordinary relevance and renewed popularity, George Orwell's 1984 takes on new life in this edition.
"Orwell saw, to his credit, that the act of falsifying reality is only secondarily a way of changing perceptions. It is, above all, a way of asserting power."The New Yorker

In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind. Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.
Lionel Trilling said of Orwell's masterpiece, "1984 is a profound, terrifying, and wholly fascinating book. It is a fantasy of the political future, and like any such fantasy, serves its author as a magnifying device for an examination of the present." Though the year 1984 now exists in the past, Orwell's novel remains an urgent call for the individual willing to speak truth to power.

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Book description
George Orwell describes a grey, totalitarian future ruled by Big Brother and his wide network of agents, including the Thought Police - a world where news is fabricated according to the authorities' wishes and people live lukewarm lives by rote.
Winston Smith, a hero who lacks heroic attributes, merely wants truth and decency. But he realises there is no hope for him in a society where privacy is non-existent and individuals with unconventional thoughts are brainwashed or executed.
Even though the year 1949 has passed, George Orwell's nightmare picture of the world we were creating remains the great modern classic portrait of a negative Utopia.
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