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Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the…
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Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race (edition 2014)

by Debby Irving (Author)

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2611165,810 (3.88)4
Member:FirstCongoLAX
Title:Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race
Authors:Debby Irving (Author)
Info:Elephant Room Press (2014), Edition: 1, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:305 IRV

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Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race by Debby Irving

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Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
One of the most important books I've read this year. I consider myself pretty 'woke', but I certainly found a lot to learn from in Irving's treatise. Irving does not spare herself embarrassment, and willingly admits to having had (and continuing to have) blind spots when it comes to race and recognizing her privilege. I absolutely related to her blindingly privileged upbringing and realizations that she was herself perpetuating the practice of 'white savior-hood'. In our attempts to seem supportive and allied with people of color, we need to constantly remind ourselves to listen instead of speak, that it is not about us, that this fight has been going on far longer than we have been involved in it or even aware of it. We must do what we can to advance the cause but absolutely not at the expense of allowing others their rightful place as owners of their lived experience. We can reach a hand out without coming off like we think we're reaching down to pull someone else up. Every white person should read this book, particularly we suburban white ladies who are newly activists and want to help without harming. ( )
  EmScape | Mar 26, 2019 |
Tag "P" = partial, as in I read part of it. This one I pretty much skimmed the whole thing. Point of the book is we're (well, white people) all racist. Author bases that on her life to which I totally could not relate. 1) Taught (by her mother) that Native Americans alcoholism caused the state they are in now - poor & on reservations, that white is not a race & various other so-called facts that I'd not heard of, let alone experienced. -- This is a chosen read by Barb's Lutheran Something (like a city read) & I thought it sounded like I might learn something valuable. I did not. -- In addition the woman doesn't write in a manner that appeals. ( )
  JeanetteSkwor | Aug 13, 2018 |
This is a phenomenal book about race, racism, inequity, and white privilege. It's an easy read in the sense that Debby takes you by the hand and leads you through her own experiences, step by step, as she wakes up to race. It's also a hard read because you'll find yourself waking up. It's hard to be confronted with your own complicity, lack of understanding, knowledge, and sensitivity. But Debby humbly shares all her mistakes and blunders, allowing us to take a deep breath and plunge into this work too.

The book is 46 short chapters (some as short as 3 pages) with a set of questions for reflection at the end of each. Debby recommends using a journal to write your thoughts. I think this is a book that could also be read in a group with the questions used for discussion.

I've just finished reading this book and I felt a desperate need to get through and read the whole book without engaging in the questions very much. This is a book I feel I need to read several more times (next time with a journal at hand) to really help everything sink in. There is a lot to unpack - this book is a great guide. ( )
1 vote aimee | Jun 11, 2018 |
I'm still reading it but so far (~1/3 of the way through) I am finding it interesting, distressing, hopeful, challenging--no doubt what the author expected. Irving does a good job in making a point without the heavy load of guilt: white privilege is something those of us who are white need to understand, but her emphasis is on moving ahead rather than dwelling on the past. ( )
1 vote TGPistole | Feb 5, 2018 |
I read this for a book group of white liberal women and it prompted a lot of sharing among the lot of us. Many questions arose for me in my own life and how I handle race relations. I look forward to continued open conversations. ( )
1 vote niquetteb | Nov 26, 2016 |
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If I love you, I have to make you conscious of the things you don't see. -- James Baldwin
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0991331303, Paperback)

For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. As a teacher, she found her best efforts to reach out to students and families of color left her wondering what she was missing. Then, in 2009, one "aha!" moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:36 -0400)

For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. As a teacher, she found her best efforts to reach out to students and families of color left her wondering what she was missing. Then, in 2009, one "aha!" moment launched an adventure of discovery and insight that drastically shifted her worldview and upended her life plan. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.… (more)

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