HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab by Shani…
Loading...

Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab (original 2014; edition 2017)

by Shani Mootoo (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6813261,873 (3.79)9
Member:ConsortiumLibrary
Title:Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab
Authors:Shani Mootoo (Author)
Info:Akashic Books (2017), 310 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab by Shani Mootoo (2014)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
An amazing book by an Indian woman from Trinidad and Canada providing insights into the lives of transgendered individuals and those who love them.

Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab introduced me to the complex life of a person who was transgendered. For the first time I was able to understand at a visceral level how a person makes and lives with decisions about gender that I do not encounter in my own life. The book’s subject, and how well that subject is handled, make it an important and unique publication, especially for those of us living in limiting traditional communities.

This book however is much more than its treatment of sexual minorities. Appropriately, characters are much more than their sexuality. A variety of themes are interwoven: loss and re-connection, migration and cultural difference, inter-generational relations, secrecy and death. . The writing is graceful and compelling. The landscapes of Trinidad and Toronto, where the book is set, are lushly portrayed both in terms of their physicality and of the differences of the people who live in each. One of the main characters is part of the Indian community that has long been a part of Trinidad. Hindu life and ritual is described.

The plot is unusual and an excellent vehicle for the story. Jonathan grew up in Toronto, cared for primarily by his mother's partner. When the couple split, Jonathan's caregiver disappears, only to be rediscovered after Jonathan is a young man. Jonathan is intensely curious about the fact the person has changed gender, but holds back questions out of respect. Gradually Jonathan and the reader come to learn the full story.

Shani Mootoo was raised in the Indian Trinidad community and moved to Canada as a young adult. Initially she devoted herself to creating films and videos, some of them widely praised. She has claimed that her interest in visual storytelling seemed safer to her than words after she was punished for telling about the sexual abuse she received as a young child. In writing her novels she displays both her visual and verbal gifts. In addition to her work in film, she has published several books of short stories, poems, and fiction. Her writing often focuses on issues of migration and sexual diversity.
I strongly recommend this book to those interested in learning to appreciate those who are transgendered---and to anyone who is curious about people, or simply cares about excellence in writing. Akashic Books is to be congratulated for making available yet another excellent and important book. ( )
  mdbrady | Oct 9, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A compelling story well outlined by other reviewers before me. The search for one's lost parent and the gender issues combine to make a poignant story. It was confusing and perhaps unnecessary for Sid to not only be transgender, but also to have been the lesbian partner to Jonathan's biological mother during his early childhood. This was not well documented in the early chapters and not central to the story. ( )
  jlafleur | Jul 1, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A moving and thought provoking story about a man looking for his mother Sid, only to find that Sid is now Sydney, a man living in Trinidad. Sydney is dying and wants to tell Jonathan about his life. A nuanced meander through the life of someone who never felt comfortable in her own skin. ( )
  RealLifeReading | Jun 22, 2017 |
Review to come. ( )
  ZaraD.Garcia-Alvarez | Jun 6, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I was initially intrigued by the wonderful title for this interesting novel. The synopsis would leave one thinking this is a story about transformation and discovery but ultimately it's a tale of love and acceptance.
Jonathan was raised by two mothers, Sid, who was loving, maternal and free spitied and India, wealthy, successful and ambitious. Sid and India part ways when Jonathan tuns 10, leaving him feeling abandoned and resentful. Years later, Jonathan is reconnected to Sid, now living in her native country of Trinidad, however Sid has become a male named Sydney.
With gorgeous prose and language we learn the journey Sid has undergone and along the way Jonathan comes to understand just how much he was cherished. ( )
  cindyfh | Jun 6, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385676220, Hardcover)

From the author of Cereus Blooms at Night and Valmiki’s Daughter, both nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, comes a haunting and courageous new novel. Written in vibrant, supple prose that vividly conjures both the tropical landscape of Trinidad and the muted winter cityscape of Toronto, Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab is a passionate eulogy to a beloved parent, and a nuanced, moving tale about the struggle to embrace the complex realities of love and family ties.
 
Jonathan Lewis-Adey was nine when his parents, who were raising him in a tree-lined Toronto neighbourhood, separated and his mother, Sid, vanished from his life. It was not until he was a grown man, and a promising writer with two books to his name, that Jonathan finally reconnected with his beloved parent—only to find, to his shock and dismay, that the woman he’d known as “Sid” had morphed into an elegant, courtly man named Sydney. In the decade following this discovery, Jonathan made regular pilgrimages from Toronto to visit Sydney, who now lived quietly in a well-appointed retreat in his native Trinidad. And on each visit, Jonathan struggled to overcome his confusion and anger at the choices Sydney had made, trying with increasing desperation to rediscover the parent he’d once adored inside this familiar stranger.
 
As the novel opens, Jonathan has been summoned urgently to Trinidad where Sydney, now aged and dying, seems at last to offer him the gift he longs for: a winding story that moves forward sideways as it slowly peels away the layers of Sydney’s life. But soon it becomes clear that when and where the story will end is up to Jonathan, and it is he who must decide what to do with Sydney’s haunting legacy of love, loss, and acceptance.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:32 -0400)

From the author of Cereus Blooms at Night and Valmiki?s Daughter, both nominated for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, comes a haunting and courageous new novel. Written in vibrant, supple prose that vividly conjures both the tropical landscape of Trinidad and the muted winter cityscape of Toronto, Moving Forward Sideways Like a Crab is a passionate eulogy to a beloved parent, and a nuanced, moving tale about the struggle to embrace the complex realities of love and family ties. Jonathan Lewis-Adey was nine when his parents, who were raising him in a tree-lined Toronto neighbourhood, separated and his mother, Sid, vanished from his life. It was not until he was a grown man, and a promising writer with two books to his name, that Jonathan finally reconnected with his beloved parent-only to find, to his shock and dismay, that the woman he?d known as ?Sid? had morphed into an elegant, courtly man named Sydney. In the decade following this discovery, Jonathan made regular pilgrimages from Toronto to visit Sydney, who now lived quietly in a well-appointed retreat in his native Trinidad. And on each visit, Jonathan struggled to overcome his confusion and anger at the choices Sydney had made, trying with increasing desperation to rediscover the parent he?d once adored inside this familiar stranger. As the novel opens, Jonathan has been summoned urgently to Trinidad where Sydney, now aged and dying, seems at last to offer him the gift he longs for: a winding story that moves forward sideways as it slowly peels away the layers of Sydney?s life. But soon it becomes clear that when and where the story will end is up to Jonathan, and it is he who must decide what to do with Sydney?s haunting legacy of love, loss, and acceptance.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Shani Mootoo's book Moving Forward Sideways Like A Crab was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.79)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 6
3.5 3
4 6
4.5
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,715,441 books! | Top bar: Always visible