HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an…
Loading...

Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an Imaginative Life (edition 2014)

by Tom Robbins

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2971670,654 (3.83)4
Internationally bestselling novelist and American icon Tom Robbins' legendary memoir--wild tales of his life and times, both at home and around the globe. Tom Robbins' warm, wise, and wonderfully weird novels--including Still Life With Woodpecker, Jitterbug Perfume, and Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates--provide an entryway into the frontier of his singular imagination. Madcap but sincere, pulsating with strong social and philosophical undercurrents, his irreverent classics have introduced countless readers to natural born hitchhiking cowgirls, born-again monkeys, a philosophizing can of beans, exiled royalty, and problematic redheads. In Tibetan Peach Pie, Robbins turns that unparalleled literary sensibility inward, stitching together stories of his unconventional life, from his Appalachian childhood to his globetrotting adventures --told in his unique voice that combines the sweet and sly, the spiritual and earthy. The grandchild of Baptist preachers, Robbins would become over the course of half a century a poet-interruptus, an air force weatherman, a radio dj, an art-critic-turned-psychedelic-journeyman, a world-famous novelist, and a counter-culture hero, leading a life as unlikely, magical, and bizarre as those of his quixotic characters. Robbins offers intimate snapshots of Appalachia during the Great Depression, the West Coast during the Sixties psychedelic revolution, international roving before homeland security monitored our travels, and New York publishing when it still relied on trees. Written with the big-hearted comedy and mesmerizing linguistic invention for which he is known, Tibetan Peach Pie is an invitation into the private world of a literary legend.… (more)
Member:sombrio
Title:Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an Imaginative Life
Authors:Tom Robbins
Info:Ecco (2014), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

Work Information

Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an Imaginative Life by Tom Robbins

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
I always wanted to know about the man behind the outlandish novels. To me, Mr. Robbins seemed down-to-earth and as brazen as his characters. In fact, the stories he tells are as incredible as the situations he created in his books. Mr. Robbins has a way with metaphors and he was able to show this talent without his narrative suffering. ( )
  Thomas.Cannon | Dec 7, 2021 |
I've been playing a game lately that when I walk into a local library to pick up a book I have on hold I also randomly choose a letter and a number. I then go to both the fiction and biography section start at the beginning of that letter on the shelves (this time it was O) and then count out that number and then pick up the book it lands on to take home and try. I figure it might give me the chance to discover someone or something that I wouldn't have picked up on my own. I don't remember the number but there aren't a lot of "O"s in biography section in the Newcastle Library so that is how I landed in the R section and on Tom Robbin's memoir, Tibetan Peach Pie.

And I'm glad I did. My only exposure to Tom Robbins has been shelving his books in the eighties at Waldenbooks. I wasn't really the counter-culture type and the covers didn't appeal to me.

I was surprised and delighted to learn that he lives here in the region--up in La Connor and that he did a stint at our newspapers as a local reporter. And I fell for his description of Seattle and its greenness as well as his descriptions of the counter-culture that I didn't give a fig about when I was twenty but now at 49 I can appreciate.

And despite my reservations--he is exactly the kind of writer I enjoy--wonderful prose with a poke in the eye humor. So I purchased a copy of Still Life With Woodpecker despite the fact that I've never liked the cover. ( )
  auldhouse | Sep 30, 2021 |
I read most everything Tom Robbins wrote when I was much younger - at least his earlier stuff, dipping back into [b:Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas|9567|Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas|Tom Robbins|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1347326626s/9567.jpg|713383] a few years back. Never read [b:Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates|8680|Fierce Invalids Home from Hot Climates|Tom Robbins|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1327866336s/8680.jpg|1117682] though, and having revisited Tom in this memoir, I just might pick it up. Here now is the reason why I still will read whatever the man writes - this passage from a trip he took to Timbuktu:

Tawny, low, and organic; hermetic, bare, crumbling in places, Timbuktu seemed made of cookie dough and starlight; rising like rough ginger popovers out of the magmatic ovens of the underworld, open only to the incandescent carousel of whirly night, a city simultaneously earthy and unearthly. Antique races had fashioned it from the very desert they'd dreamed upon, enriched it with gold and salt, elevated it with wisdom (holy and astronomic) from near and far – and now must look on silently from beyond the grave as the desert takes it back.

Magmatic ovens of the underworld indeed. ( )
  markflanagan | Jul 13, 2020 |
Now that Dos Equis is retiring Jonathan Goldsmith as the most interesting man in the world...I would like to nominate Tom Robbins. Yeah, yeah, I am a diehard fan of his books...but what a long strange trip his life has been. ( )
  CarolO | May 26, 2016 |
I bought this as an audiobook, and I would recommend that lovers of language purchase a paperback instead. There were too many times I wanted to savor the unique words and phrases that Tom Robbins is famous for.

The beginning of the book felt a bit too precious and self-conscious for my liking, and I almost gave up on it. However, hang in there: it gets a whole lot better. By the end I was enthralled. For writers, Robbins' discussion of his process and his experiences with writing/publication are golden. ( )
  NadineFeldman | Mar 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tom Robbinsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Happe, FrançoisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Internationally bestselling novelist and American icon Tom Robbins' legendary memoir--wild tales of his life and times, both at home and around the globe. Tom Robbins' warm, wise, and wonderfully weird novels--including Still Life With Woodpecker, Jitterbug Perfume, and Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates--provide an entryway into the frontier of his singular imagination. Madcap but sincere, pulsating with strong social and philosophical undercurrents, his irreverent classics have introduced countless readers to natural born hitchhiking cowgirls, born-again monkeys, a philosophizing can of beans, exiled royalty, and problematic redheads. In Tibetan Peach Pie, Robbins turns that unparalleled literary sensibility inward, stitching together stories of his unconventional life, from his Appalachian childhood to his globetrotting adventures --told in his unique voice that combines the sweet and sly, the spiritual and earthy. The grandchild of Baptist preachers, Robbins would become over the course of half a century a poet-interruptus, an air force weatherman, a radio dj, an art-critic-turned-psychedelic-journeyman, a world-famous novelist, and a counter-culture hero, leading a life as unlikely, magical, and bizarre as those of his quixotic characters. Robbins offers intimate snapshots of Appalachia during the Great Depression, the West Coast during the Sixties psychedelic revolution, international roving before homeland security monitored our travels, and New York publishing when it still relied on trees. Written with the big-hearted comedy and mesmerizing linguistic invention for which he is known, Tibetan Peach Pie is an invitation into the private world of a literary legend.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5 3
3 16
3.5 5
4 28
4.5 2
5 15

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 166,245,877 books! | Top bar: Always visible