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Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in…
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Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time (edition 2014)

by Jeff Sutherland (Author)

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3711452,862 (4.06)None
The revolutionary project management system that transformed how the tech industry works, now translated and explained for the broader business world. For those who believe that there must be a more efficient way for people to get things done, Scrum pioneer Jeff Sutherland offers a thought provoking book about the management process that is changing the way we work.… (more)
Member:danielgullo
Title:Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time
Authors:Jeff Sutherland (Author)
Info:Currency (2014), Edition: 1st, 256 pages
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Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland

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Very good book for motivate using scrum and explain it origins. Every IT professional should read. ( )
  darcimf | Mar 31, 2021 |
The Scrum method sounds like a superior way to handle large projects, but it's a hard term to define. It's less 'centralized planning' and more 'in-the-field adaptation.' It does not subscribe to Gantt charts, which is a project scheduling tool. In fact, it suggests doing away with them. Scrum teams tend to be smaller than traditional teams. In short, there's a system here but it's hard to pin down other than to see if it works for you and your team based on how quickly the results are achieved for a given timeframe.

And then near the middle of the book the overall tone shifts. What began as an exploration of Scrum and how to implement it devolved into a litany of generic workplace admonishments that no one seriously disagrees with. Things like "don't multitask because you're bad at it" or "don't work long hours just because it's the culture" or "don't be an asshole or tolerate anyone else being one." It's the health equivalent of saying if you're out of shape and overweight, just start exercising more and eating better and you'll see significant improvements. It's advice that conveniently forgets the human part of the equation as to why these processes frequently fail. ( )
  Daniel.Estes | Nov 11, 2020 |
Always looking for a strategy to increase productivity, I was extremely pleased to get my hands on Jeff Sutherland’s book, Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time. I have already started to apply the concepts into my day to day operations because we tend to work with a lot of projects. This book has also been an invaluable supporting reference as I teach an advanced instructional design class for the University of Wyoming. As part of the class, I introduced them to the Scrum model as an alternative to the traditional ADDIE model typically taught. Read More ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
This is not a Scrum how-to book. Rather, the story of its making and its philosophy. The concepts are highly adaptable to not just software, business, but everyday life as well. He talks of how to increase productivity of teams by improving communication, eliminating waste, and continuous improvement. I especially liked the idea is that team happiness is the greatest predictor of success. I enjoyed the conversational style and the positive, inclusive attitude. ( )
  Gezemice | Oct 29, 2018 |
There are surely better SCRUM books to buy. The author, CEO of Scrum, Inc. (it's his story, co-authored with his son), is a bit self-congratulatory, and his cheerleading for SCRUM often comes across like he's plugging a miracle weight loss regimen. That said, it did get me excited about some scrummy ideas, and inspire me to try to put some into practice. ( )
  Tytania | Sep 9, 2018 |
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The revolutionary project management system that transformed how the tech industry works, now translated and explained for the broader business world. For those who believe that there must be a more efficient way for people to get things done, Scrum pioneer Jeff Sutherland offers a thought provoking book about the management process that is changing the way we work.

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