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The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and…
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The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American… (original 2014; edition 2016)

by Edward E. Baptist (Author)

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7981921,221 (4.33)1 / 20
Historian Edward Baptist reveals how the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States.
Member:MaryPinko
Title:The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
Authors:Edward E. Baptist (Author)
Info:Basic Books (2016), Edition: Reprint, 560 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist (2014)

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» See also 20 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
File this under "could have been half as long and thus made its points more effectively," but then, perhaps also file under "has something for everyone." If you were unaware that slavery in America was horrific and brutal, this book will tell you all about that (and if you were aware, you will quickly grow tired of the sub-Dickensian heart-string pulling: I know slavery was horrible, puerile melodrama doesn't help me in any way). If you want solid statistics and argument about the reliance of economic growth on American slavery, this book will give you that (and if you don't, don't worry, another heart-string puller will show up sooner or later). In the end, I just skimmed the narratives, particularly the 'representative' ones that Baptist put together himself. I'm happy to read the stories told by actual ex-slaves; I have no interest in made-for-TV-actual-reproductions-of-possible-events. I advise you do the same, and focus on the argument: property in humans made possible the tremendous economic growth of the USA in the nineteenth century, and that growth also fed into world markets. Our economies would not exist as they do today were it not for the enslavement of millions of men and women. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
This is NOT an easy read, but it is fantastic. Each chapter moved ahead chronologically, but also focuses on one aspect of slavery (one chapter on forced migration, one on the auction block, one on life in the cotton fields, etc.) and also highlights individual people and how they were impacted so while learning about larger social, political, and economic forces you never lose track of the lived experiences of the slaves themselves. A masterpiece!! ( )
  Tarawyn | Jun 28, 2020 |
Read 2015. ( )
  sasameyuki | May 12, 2020 |
'twas magisterial, huge. A very thorough stroll over the (now) USA's history of slavery, the cruelty, the effectively universal acceptance 'mongst the white folks.

For anyone else: 5 stars. For me, well, I more wanted to be interested that actually was, so it didn't grab me that much, so 4 ( )
  GirlMeetsTractor | Mar 22, 2020 |
This is an amazing book. It provides a very detailed and thorough account of the integral role slavery played in the development of the United States between its founding and the Civil War. The author does a terrific job of interweaving personal stories of former slaves gathered during the early 1900s to make the story more visceral and human. It will open your eyes to the fact that slavery is still a large part of our economic and social foundation today.

( )
  grandpahobo | Sep 26, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Edward E. Baptistprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bryson, TimmDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butler, RonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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A beautiful late April day, seventy-two years after slavery ended in the United States. (Introduction)
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Historian Edward Baptist reveals how the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States.

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