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The Buried Giant (Vintage International) by…
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The Buried Giant (Vintage International) (original 2015; edition 2016)

by Kazuo Ishiguro (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,4262102,650 (3.64)274
"An extraordinary new novel from the author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize winning The Remains of the Day. "You've long set your heart against it, Axl, I know. But it's time now to think on it anew. There's a journey we must go on, and no more delay. . ." The Buried Giant begins as a couple set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen in years. Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro's first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war"--… (more)
Member:danisaur
Title:The Buried Giant (Vintage International)
Authors:Kazuo Ishiguro (Author)
Info:Vintage (2016), Edition: Reprint, 336 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro (2015)

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» See also 274 mentions

English (196)  German (4)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (2)  Chinese, traditional (1)  Finnish (1)  Italian (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (208)
Showing 1-5 of 196 (next | show all)
A beautiful, allegorical tale that runs slow but sure to a definite conclusion. Before read it I had come across some negative reviews that described it as controversial or fantasy or some such. No doubt written by people that write reviews and not books. I loved it for its magical mistiness, its contrived vagueness and meandering style. It reminded me a bit of The Wake by Paul Kingsnorth. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
I have mixed feelings about this book. It was hard for me to feel connected to any character and to get into the story due to inconsistencies. Our book group had a great discussion about various parts of the book and our individual interpretations, however. ( )
  niquetteb | Sep 23, 2020 |
Very classic Ishiguro, read on audiobook. At times pretty annoying bc it's definitely very allegorical but the symbolism goes so deep that it's not much fun to read. The ending was pretty jaw dropping. I see how Hanya Yanagihara says he's one of her favorite authors but I like her version of the buried lead coming out at the end better (although hers are much more extreme, maybe too extreme) ( )
  Lorem | Sep 11, 2020 |
This is a fairy tale and like other fairy tales it teaches you valuable lessons. Lessons about love between a husband and wife who share a dark secret they've both have forgotten. They are brave enough to go looking for their son who's been lost and in their search they find the darkest parts of themselves. They never find their son but discover themselves in not forgetting but in forgiving. ( )
  merilosa | Sep 7, 2020 |
Axl & Beatrice have left their village to find their son, departed many years ago. Axl & Beatrice have not too many memories of why and where their son is, as the mist that has been hovering seems to have faded memories of even an hour ago.
In their travels to find their son, the encounter Saxon and Briton entities who have many memories of the battles that have occurred between them.

This is a hard book to really get in to. Tolkien-ish in the fantasy genre and a little hard to decipher a deeper meaning to it. The ending was worth the wait, though. ( )
  JReynolds1959 | Sep 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 196 (next | show all)
Fantasy and historical fiction and myth here run together with the Matter of Britain, in a novel that’s easy to admire, to respect and to enjoy, but difficult to love. Still, “The Buried Giant” does what important books do: It remains in the mind long after it has been read, refusing to leave, forcing one to turn it over and over. On a second reading, and on a third, its characters and events and motives are easier to understand, but even so, it guards its secrets and its world close.
 
There are authors who write in tidy, classifiable, immediately recognizable genres — Jane Austen, Alexandre Dumas, William Faulkner, Gabriel García Márquez, to name a few — and then there are those who adamantly do not. These others can surprise us with story lines and settings that are guises to be worn and shucked after the telling. Masters of reinvention, they slip from era to era, land to land, changing idioms, adapting styles, heedless of labels. They are creatures of a nonsectarian world, comfortable in many skins, channelers of languages. What interests them above all in their invented universes is the abiding human heart.

Kazuo Ishiguro is such a writer.
added by lorax | editWashington Post, Marie Arana (Feb 24, 2015)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ishiguro, Kazuoprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gower, NeilEndpaper art; (cover?) typographysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horovitch, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mendelsund, PeterCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weinstein, IrisDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Gradiva (155)
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DEBORAH ROGERS
1938-2014
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You would have searched a long time for the sort of winding lane or tranquil meadow for which England later became celebrated.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (2)

"An extraordinary new novel from the author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize winning The Remains of the Day. "You've long set your heart against it, Axl, I know. But it's time now to think on it anew. There's a journey we must go on, and no more delay. . ." The Buried Giant begins as a couple set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen in years. Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro's first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war"--

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Book description
'There's a journey we must go on, and no more delay...' This is the extraordinary new novel from the author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize winning The Remains of the Day. The Romans have long since departed, and Britain is steadily declining into ruin. But at least the wars that once ravaged the country have ceased. The Buried Giant begins as a couple, Axl and Beatrice, set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen for years. They expect to face many hazards - some strange and other - worldly - but they cannot yet foresee how their journey will reveal to them dark and forgotten corners of their love for one another. Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro's first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war. [www.bookdepositiry.com]
In post-Arthurian Britain, the wars that once ravaged between the Saxons and the Britons have finally ceased. Axl and Beatrice, an elderly British couple, set off to visit their son, whom they haven't seen in years. And because a strange mist has caused mass amnesia throughout the land, they can scarcely remember anything about him.
As they are joined on their journey by a Saxon warrior, his orphan charge, and an illustrious knight, Axl and Beatrice slowly begin to remember the dark and troubled past they all share. By turns savage, suspenseful, and intensely moving, The Buried Giant is a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory, an extraordinary tale of love, vengeance, and war.
Haiku summary
Axl and Beatrice
go on a quest and find the
truth about themselves.
(passion4reading)

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