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Roman Provincial Administration

by John Rogan

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In his Aeneid, Virgil urges the Romans not to forget that government is their strength and to accustom men to peace. But when the Roman Empire at its height stretched from the British Isles to the deserts of Egypt, and embraced a huge number of different peoples and cultures, how did they achieve this so successfully? In Roman Provincial Administration, John Rogan answers this question, examining the roles played by the army, client kings, and local and central government. Taking a wide selection of sources, ranging from Tacitus' account of his father-in-law's time as governor of Britain to the New Testament's account of Roman rule in the Middle East, the author applies his knowledge of organisational theory to how the Romans ruled their empire, spreading their ideas and fulfilling what Virgil told them was their destiny.… (more)
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Unless I am mistaken this book was written by an amateur historian. As such it's a nice achievement, but it's greatest weaknesses are that it's too short even for an introductory book and that the bibliography only contains about twenty references. The author seems to be competent on each topic, but he treats them very briefly and there seems to be no general plan for tying the chapters together. Chapter 4, where the author recounts correspondence sent between a local governor and the emperor Trajan, is the most interesting one because it actually goes into some detail on practical government.
  thcson | Nov 16, 2020 |
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In his Aeneid, Virgil urges the Romans not to forget that government is their strength and to accustom men to peace. But when the Roman Empire at its height stretched from the British Isles to the deserts of Egypt, and embraced a huge number of different peoples and cultures, how did they achieve this so successfully? In Roman Provincial Administration, John Rogan answers this question, examining the roles played by the army, client kings, and local and central government. Taking a wide selection of sources, ranging from Tacitus' account of his father-in-law's time as governor of Britain to the New Testament's account of Roman rule in the Middle East, the author applies his knowledge of organisational theory to how the Romans ruled their empire, spreading their ideas and fulfilling what Virgil told them was their destiny.

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