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Freedom 7: The Historic Flight of Alan B. Shepard, Jr. (2014)

by Colin Burgess

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Inevitably, there are times in a nation's history when its hopes, fears and confidence in its own destiny appear to hinge on the fate of a single person. One of these pivotal moments occurred on the early morning of May 5, 1961, when a 37-year-old test pilot squeezed himself into the confines of the tiny Mercury spacecraft that he had named Freedom 7. On that historic day, U.S. Navy Commander Alan Shepard carried with him the hopes, prayers, and anxieties of a nation as his Redstone rocket blasted free of the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, hurling him upwards on a 15-minute suborbital flight that also propelled the United States into the bold new frontier of human space exploration. This book tells the enthralling story of that pioeering flight as recalled by many of the participants in the Freedom 7 story, including Shepard himself, with anecdotal details and tales never before revealed in print. Although beaten into space just three weeks earlier by the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, Alan Shepard's history-making mission aboard Freedom 7 nevertheless provided America's first tentative step into space that would one day see its Apollo astronauts - including Alan Shepard - walk on the Moon.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Colin Burgessprimary authorall editionscalculated
Graveline, Duane E.Forewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilkie, JimCover designersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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This book is fondly dedicated to the memory of a remarkable man from "slower, lower Delaware" (as he called his beloved state) who was respectfully acknowledged in my two previous books as a great friend, a tireless helper, a proud patriot, and a patient mentor to me; a kind-hearted man known simply to one and all as 'Sully'. His wisdom, guidance and friendship will be forever cherished, and sadly missed by me. Vale , and profound thanks for a life replete with pride and nobility to: Lt. Col. Walter B. ('Sully') Sullivan, Jr., U.S. Air Force (Ret'd.) (1938-2012)
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On 25 September 1961, President John F. Kennedy gave an impassioned address to the United Nations General Assembly in New York City, during which he presented proposals for a new disarmament program as well as warning of "the smoldering coals of war in Southeast Asia." He also called for peaceful cooperation in the new frontier of outer space.
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Inevitably, there are times in a nation's history when its hopes, fears and confidence in its own destiny appear to hinge on the fate of a single person. One of these pivotal moments occurred on the early morning of May 5, 1961, when a 37-year-old test pilot squeezed himself into the confines of the tiny Mercury spacecraft that he had named Freedom 7. On that historic day, U.S. Navy Commander Alan Shepard carried with him the hopes, prayers, and anxieties of a nation as his Redstone rocket blasted free of the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, hurling him upwards on a 15-minute suborbital flight that also propelled the United States into the bold new frontier of human space exploration. This book tells the enthralling story of that pioeering flight as recalled by many of the participants in the Freedom 7 story, including Shepard himself, with anecdotal details and tales never before revealed in print. Although beaten into space just three weeks earlier by the Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, Alan Shepard's history-making mission aboard Freedom 7 nevertheless provided America's first tentative step into space that would one day see its Apollo astronauts - including Alan Shepard - walk on the Moon.

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