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Cicero: On the Orator, Books I-II (Loeb…
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Cicero: On the Orator, Books I-II (Loeb Classical Library No. 348) (English and Latin Edition) (edition 1948)

by Cicero (Author), E. W. Sutton (Translator), H. Rackham (Translator)

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We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. Cicero (Marcus Tullius, 106-43 BCE), Roman lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, of whom we know more than of any other Roman, lived through the stirring era which saw the rise, dictatorship, and death of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. In his political speeches especially and in his correspondence we see the excitement, tension and intrigue of politics and the part he played in the turmoil of the time. Of about 106 speeches, delivered before the Roman people or the Senate if they were political, before jurors if judicial, 58 survive (a few of them incompletely). In the fourteenth century Petrarch and other Italian humanists discovered manuscripts containing more than 900 letters of which more than 800 were written by Cicero and nearly 100 by others to him. These afford a revelation of the man all the more striking because most were not written for publication. Six rhetorical works survive and another in fragments. Philosophical works include seven extant major compositions and a number of others; and some lost. There is also poetry, some original, some as translations from the Greek.… (more)
Member:Biblio-Ortenburg
Title:Cicero: On the Orator, Books I-II (Loeb Classical Library No. 348) (English and Latin Edition)
Authors:Cicero (Author)
Other authors:E. W. Sutton (Translator), H. Rackham (Translator)
Info:Harvard University Press (1948), 479 pages
Collections:Main Collection
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Cicero: On the Orator, Books I-II by Cicero

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ciceroprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rackham, HarrisIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sutton, E. W.Translatorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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Cogitanti mihi saepenumero, et memoria vetera repetenti, perbeati fuisse, Quinte frater, illi videri solent, qui in optima republica, cum et honoribus, et rerum gestarum gloria florerent, eum vitae cursum tenere potuerunt, ut uel in negotio sine periculo, vel in otio cum dignitate esse possent.
When, as often happens, brother Quintus, I think over and recall the days of old, those men always seem to me to have been singularly happy who, with the State at her best, and while enjoying high distinctions and the fame of their achievements, were able to maintain such a course of life that they could either engage in activity that involved no risk or enjoy a dignified repose.
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We know more of Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BCE), lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, than of any other Roman. Besides much else, his work conveys the turmoil of his time, and the part he played in a period that saw the rise and fall of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. Cicero (Marcus Tullius, 106-43 BCE), Roman lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, of whom we know more than of any other Roman, lived through the stirring era which saw the rise, dictatorship, and death of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. In his political speeches especially and in his correspondence we see the excitement, tension and intrigue of politics and the part he played in the turmoil of the time. Of about 106 speeches, delivered before the Roman people or the Senate if they were political, before jurors if judicial, 58 survive (a few of them incompletely). In the fourteenth century Petrarch and other Italian humanists discovered manuscripts containing more than 900 letters of which more than 800 were written by Cicero and nearly 100 by others to him. These afford a revelation of the man all the more striking because most were not written for publication. Six rhetorical works survive and another in fragments. Philosophical works include seven extant major compositions and a number of others; and some lost. There is also poetry, some original, some as translations from the Greek.

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