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El Deafo

by Cece Bell

Other authors: David Lasky (Colorist)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,5673365,018 (4.36)131
The author recounts in graphic novel format her experiences with hearing loss at a young age, including using a bulky hearing aid, learning how to lip read, and determining her "superpower." "Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful--and very awkward--hearing aid. The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear--sometimes things she shouldn't--but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become "El Deafo, Listener for All." And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she's longed for"--… (more)
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» See also 131 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 334 (next | show all)
Good for an intermediate age group. It tells the story of a girl navigating school, friendships, and childhood at large as a deaf person. I would definitely have it in my classroom; it's very sweet and relatable while also exposing kids to a disability they might not necessarily be familiar.
  MTollisen | Jan 19, 2023 |
This graphic novel is a great way to educate students on a different way people go through life. ( )
  olivia.comstock | Jan 18, 2023 |
Loved this. I really enjoy the memoirs that I've read in graphic novel format. This one was extra fun because the author grew up about the same time I did. I was surprised and delighted to see a reference to "warm fuzzies" and "cold pricklies" toward the end. I don't remember getting to do such a cool activity when we got the lesson in school, though.
The author did a beautiful job conveying what it was like for her to lose her hearing as a child. It was interesting to see the world from Cece's perspective. The story was told with humor and heart, and I highly recommend it. ( )
  Harks | Dec 17, 2022 |
I love a well-done childhood memoir and the artwork is simply charming. ( )
  fionaanne | Nov 28, 2022 |
A brilliant and humorous graphic memoir on what it was like for Bell to grow up deaf. I appreciated how much I learnt about a deaf experience and some basic courtesies I could do when I'm speaking when speaking to anyone: face people directly, don't exaggerate mouth movements nor slow down nor raise volume.

I also appreciated how the common themes of childhood still resonated: feeling like an outsider, navigating friendships, insecurities, crushes. Now compound this with the public misconception of deafness and having to - in Bell's case, involuntarily - physically distinguish yourself (with a Phonic Ear) in public in order to be able to communicate with the speaking and hearing world. Compound this with the symbolism of the rabbits, the beautiful art style, the creativity of using the speech bubbles to visualise the deafness. And the result is a funny, thoughtful, and informative memoir that I can highly recommend to readers of all ages. ( )
  kitzyl | Oct 9, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 334 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cece Bellprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lasky, DavidColoristsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Keegan, CaitlinCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For George and Barbara Bell, parents extraordinaire
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I was a regular little kid.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The author recounts in graphic novel format her experiences with hearing loss at a young age, including using a bulky hearing aid, learning how to lip read, and determining her "superpower." "Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful--and very awkward--hearing aid. The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear--sometimes things she shouldn't--but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become "El Deafo, Listener for All." And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she's longed for"--

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Book description
Going to school and making new friends can be tough. But going to school and making new friends while wearing a bulky hearing aid strapped to your chest? That requires superpowers! In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful—and very awkward—hearing aid.
The Phonic Ear gives Cece the ability to hear—sometimes things she shouldn’t—but also isolates her from her classmates. She really just wants to fit in and find a true friend, someone who appreciates her as she is. After some trouble, she is finally able to harness the power of the Phonic Ear and become “El Deafo, Listener for All.” And more importantly, declare a place for herself in the world and find the friend she’s longed for.
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