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Finders Keepers: A Novel (The Bill Hodges…
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Finders Keepers: A Novel (The Bill Hodges Trilogy) (edition 2015)

by Stephen King (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,4591792,982 (3.94)1 / 144
"A masterful, intensely suspenseful novel about a reader whose obsession with a reclusive writer goes far too far--a book about the power of storytelling, starring the same trio of unlikely and winning heroes King introduced in Mr. Mercedes" -- ""Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famous character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the nonconformist Jimmy Gold has sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel. Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away for another crime. Decades later, a boy named Pete Saubers finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family that Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more deranged and vengeful Morris when he's released from prison after thirty-five years" --… (more)
Member:sik7
Title:Finders Keepers: A Novel (The Bill Hodges Trilogy)
Authors:Stephen King (Author)
Info:Scribner (2015), Edition: First Edition, 448 pages
Collections:Your library
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Finders Keepers by Stephen King

Recently added by3Bookworm, Arina8888, private library, kristiederuiter, Ingunn.Monsen, keithlaf, gcpinder
  1. 30
    Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King (sturlington, Anonymous user)
    sturlington: Finders Keepers is the sequel to Mr. Mercedes
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» See also 144 mentions

English (173)  Italian (2)  Danish (2)  French (1)  German (1)  All languages (179)
Showing 1-5 of 173 (next | show all)
Cuando terminé el volumen anterior de esta trilogía, me pregunté cuál era el hilo conductor que iba a seguirse para coser la trilogía. Ahora lo sé, pero es tan fino que no termina de satisfacerme y temo que, cuando lea la tercera parte, confirmaré mi sospecha de que esta era innecesaria para la historia y el desarrollo de unos personajes que, por otra parte, poco tienen porque el grueso de la narración recae sobre otros (los protagonistas de la primera no aparecen hasta la mitad del libro).

Por fortuna, está muy bien escrita y editada y, aunque la trama es, en mi humilde opinión, más floja que la de la entrega anterior, se lee bien aunque nunca lleguemos a sentir por el antagonista lo que sentimos con la obvia comparación de Annie Wilkins ([book:Misery|10614]), y el regusto sea el de otra entrega más de una saga de novela negra que, si no fuera por el cliffhanger final, no aportaría mucho al conjunto en el que queda enmarcada.

Por cierto: ese mismo elemento final desbarajusta la campaña mediática de estas novelas, basada en un King ajeno a sus temáticas habituales. Por suerte, la cabra tira al monte. ( )
  tecniferio | May 12, 2022 |
I liked this more than Mr Mercedes, in fact I loved it. A great thriller with a neat central concept that allows King to ruminate on the relationship between writer and reader. He does this brilliantly, never labouring the point or letting it get in the way of the story. The set up for the final book in the Hodges trilogy is perfect and I can't wait to read it. ( )
  whatmeworry | Apr 9, 2022 |
Not unlike what happened with the previous book in this series, Mr. Mercedes, I found myself thinking that Stephen King’s skills work better when applied to horror and supernatural themes, because this foray into crime/thriller territory seems to hinder a little his artistic flair, even though Finders Keepers still remains a good, quite enjoyable story. The ending of the novel made me wonder if the author did not entertain some thoughts along those same lines, because in the final portion of the story he introduces some supernatural elements that so far were absent from the overall narrative. But I’m getting ahead of myself…

John Rothstein is a once-famous author who chose to stop publishing his works a long time ago, although he has not stopped writing, pouring his thoughts and ideas into a series of notebooks he keeps sealed in a safe. Morris Bellamy is a young man obsessed with Rothstein’s works, and in particular with the protagonist of the novels - Jimmy Gold - whose character arc down the road displeased him immensely. Being the kind of fan who cannot take ‘no’ for an answer (in a sort of mirror image of Annie Wilkes from Misery), Bellamy breaks into Rothstein’s house, kills him and steals the author’s notebooks from the safe, together with a sizable amount of cash: the notebooks contain many unpublished short stories, and the final Jimmy Gold novel - a real treasure trove for the obsessed young man, who proceeds to store his precious findings into a trunk he hides near his house, intending to read them at his leisure. Unfortunately, a previous crime he committed catches up with him, so he’s arrested and jailed for a few decades - his thoughts never far from the cherished catch he intends to retrieve once he will regain his freedom.

Some 30 years later, teenage Peter Saubers comes to live in what used to be Morris’ house: the boy’s family suffers from financial hardships because his father was grievously wounded in the job fair attack described in Mr. Mercedes: when he finds a half-buried trunk containing a great number of notebooks and several thousand dollars, Peter decides to send the money to his parents in small installments, as if from an unknown benefactor, and reading the notebooks he discovers both Rothstein’s works and his own love of books and literature, which will shape his future life. Peter’s troubles start when Bellamy is finally released from prison, and goes to unearth his buried treasure, only to find the trunk empty…

Bill Hodges, Holly and Jerome come into this picture much later, when young Peter finds himself facing Bellamy’s threats and dealing with something much greater and far more dangerous than he can handle: in this second volume of the trilogy, the three of them are more like side characters, while the focus remains mostly of Morris and Peter - and, of course, on books and stories and the love of reading. This was the theme that most appealed to me, unsurprisingly, and in the end I found myself caring less for Hodges & Co.’s investigations and reconstruction of the events than I did for what I perceived as the core story, i.e. the Journey of the Lost Notebooks :-)

What’s fascinating here is the different approach to literature shown by Morris and Peter, who stand at the opposite ends of the spectrum: the former is a vicious, no good individual whose encounter with Rothstein’s works does not engender a moral uplifting but rather consolidates his outlook on life, to the point that he feels a sort of ownership toward the character, and when Jimmy Gold’s development does not meet his criteria, his rage toward Rothstein knows no bounds. Even though taken to narrative extremes by King, this is the kind of attitude shown by less-balanced readers when writers don’t move their stories toward the fans’ hoped-for direction, or when books don’t come out at an acceptable speed. On the other hand, Peter is the incarnation of us book lovers, a person who enjoys getting lost in stories, being enchanted by the author’s voice and style, someone who finds in books the means of opening one’s mind, or to seek solace from life’s troubles.

While there are no trademark horror elements in Finders Keepers, it’s still possible to feel dread because the story moves at a slow but unrelenting pace toward the inevitable showdown between Peter and Morris, the first exhibiting all the characteristics of youthful wounded innocence so dear to King’s narrative, and the second portraying the kind of evil that needs no supernatural roots to prove chillingly scary. They are indeed the zenith and nadir of the story, leaving little room for Hodges and partners who, in this installment, don’t seem to have changed much from their appearance in Mr. Mercedes: of course, Hodges is now living a healthier kind of life, thanks to the scare brought on by his heart attack; and Holly is moving toward a greater independence and self-assurance, as she deals with her psychological problems; and Jerome is less boyish and more mature - but they don’t get enough page space to truly show great changes. In this respect, they sort of suffer from a “middle book syndrome” that will hopefully be overcome in the final volume of the trilogy.

And about this, a few hints in the course of the book, and the last chapter, seem to point toward a return to a horror/supernatural element for the third volume, given the reappearance of Brady Hartsfield - the villain from Mr. Mercedes - and the ominous hints about the danger he might still represent. I for one will more than welcome Stephen King’s return to his old “hunting grounds”, hoping for a delightfully harrowing conclusion to this trilogy. ( )
  SpaceandSorcery | Dec 24, 2021 |
In this second amazing addition to the Bill Hodges trilogy (and Holly Gibney story ark) we leave the insanity of the Mercedes Killer behind for a little while and explore the dark side of literary obsession. In the '60's a young man and two of his "friends" break into a famous writers home, while his partners are after the simple allure of money, this other man wants nothing more than a few words with his favorite writer...and then to take the writers words away from him. After getting away with a decent amount of cash (said famous writer didn't believe in banks) and a large haul of notebooks filled with the writer's unpublished works of years since leaving the public light (including an additional 2 books to turn his most famous "trilogy" into a "saga") the leader of this band of bandits is not satisfied with how the writer treated his fictional hero in the three published works...and there passes a death sentence on the author. After the 3 get away far enough, the head man takes care of the other two and ends up with everything...and people say crimes doesn't pay. Sometime later this young man is arrested, but for a different crime and as he is sentenced to a long prison sentence, he vows to make the best of his time and eventually get out to reclaim his treasure...not even the money but just to read those unpublished books the author had written. This vow becomes his obsession, his life's goal, and the only thing at all that helps him survive in prison. Meanwhile, years later another young man is discovering a buried trunk close to his house and the wonders of what it contains.

As things begin to heat up and the stakes become deadly, our old friends at the newly formed Finders Keepers private investigation agency, Bill Hodges and Holly Gibney are also reunited with the dear Jerome Robinson during his summer vacation from college. The trio who once "stopped" the deranged Mercedes Killer must now face off with a man obsessed with taking back the only thing he seems to think he has claim to. Speaking of the infamous Mr. Mercedes...how have things been with him since last we saw him? The plot and action in Finders Keepers is sure to keep you buckled in and gripping the wheel just as much as Mr. Mercedes did before it...and keep the RPMs up and the motor roaring as we race into End Of Watch. ( )
  Emery_Demers | Dec 5, 2021 |
3.5/5

Upon reading the back of the book, I thought this would be Misery-esque, but it really wasn't. While it was focused on how super fans react to authors in a general sense, it explored both the good and the bad. It was an interesting read, but it felt a little long getting to the end. Overall, it was all right. ( )
  battlearmanda | Nov 30, 2021 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
King, Stephenprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kleinschmidt, BernhardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Patton, WillNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rekiaro, IlkkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life." Joseph Campbell
"Shit don't mean shit." Jimmy Gold
Dedication
Thinking of John D. MacDonald
First words
"Wake up, genius."
Quotations
For readers, one of life’s most electrifying discoveries is that they are readers—not just capable of doing it (which Morris already knew), but in love with it. Hopelessly. Head over heels. The first book that does that is never forgotten, and each page seems to bring a fresh revelation, one that burns and exalts: Yes! That’s how it is! Yes! I saw that, too! And, of course, That’s what I think! That’s what I FEEL!
A good novelist does not lead his characters, he follows them. A good novelist does not create events, he watches them happen and then writes down what he sees.
No. I was going to say his work changed my life, but that’s not right. I don’t think a teenager has much of a life to change. I just turned eighteen last month. I guess what I mean is his work changed my heart.
Shit don't mean shit.
His chief interest was in reading fiction, then trying to analyze what he had read, fitting it into a larger pattern.
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"A masterful, intensely suspenseful novel about a reader whose obsession with a reclusive writer goes far too far--a book about the power of storytelling, starring the same trio of unlikely and winning heroes King introduced in Mr. Mercedes" -- ""Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famous character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the nonconformist Jimmy Gold has sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel. Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away for another crime. Decades later, a boy named Pete Saubers finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family that Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more deranged and vengeful Morris when he's released from prison after thirty-five years" --

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"Wake up, genius." So begins King's instantly riveting story about a vengeful reader. The genius is John Rothstein, an iconic author who created a famously beloved character, Jimmy Gold, but who hasn't published a book for decades. Morris Bellamy is livid, not just because Rothstein has stopped providing books, but because the non-conformist Jimmy Gold sold out for a career in advertising. Morris kills Rothstein and empties his safe of cash, yes, but the real treasure is a trove of notebooks containing at least one more Gold novel.

Morris hides the money and the notebooks, and then he is locked away in a high-security prison for a different crime. Decades later, a young teen named Pete Saubers, whose father was injured in the Mr. Mercedes killings, finds the treasure, and now it is Pete and his family whom Bill Hodges, Holly Gibney, and Jerome Robinson must rescue from the ever-more-deranged and vengeful Morris when he is released from prison after thirty-five years - and wants his money and his notebooks back.
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