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The Name Of The Rose (Vintage Classics) by…
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The Name Of The Rose (Vintage Classics) (original 1980; edition 2004)

by Umberto Eco (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
16,604255210 (4.2)3 / 973
In 1327, finding his sensitive mission at an Italian abbey further complicated by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William of Baskerville turns detective.
Member:MyOwnWorld
Title:The Name Of The Rose (Vintage Classics)
Authors:Umberto Eco (Author)
Info:Vintage Classics (2004), Edition: New Ed, 592 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work details

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco (Author) (1980)

  1. 233
    Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco (ehines, hankreardon, Sensei-CRS)
    ehines: Surprised not to find this way up on Name of the Rose's rec list. FP is a much more recent period piece--the period is marked by 1968 as Name of the Rose's is marked by the emergence of the Franciscans. Well done look at the conspiratorial mindset.
  2. 101
    Dissolution by C. J. Sansom (Caramellunacy)
    Caramellunacy: Both feature ghastly murders in a monastery in a time of religious conflict and turmoil. The Name of the Rose (medieval Italy) is more philosophical, while Dissolution (Tudor England) is more of a straight-forward historical mystery. Both offer interesting insights into the political and religious issues of the times.… (more)
  3. 113
    The Key to The Name of the Rose: Including Translations of All Non-English Passages by Adele J. Haft (Taphophile13)
  4. 81
    Baudolino by Umberto Eco (aces)
  5. 82
    An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears (Booksloth)
  6. 71
    The Quincunx by Charles Palliser (Booksloth)
  7. 72
    The Club Dumas by Arturo Pérez-Reverte (mrcmrc)
  8. 74
    My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk (adithyajones, IamAleem)
    adithyajones: Both of them are historical mystery fiction but both are not plain vanilla whodunits rather serious books which looks at the life at that time in minute detail
  9. 74
    The Secret History by Donna Tartt (girlunderglass)
    girlunderglass: Two words: mystery + learned men (in The Name of the Rose, scholars of ecclesiastical books, in TSH of ancient Greek books)
  10. 21
    Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges (Oct326)
    Oct326: C'è molto Borges nel "Nome della Rosa". Se qualcuno ha letto il secondo ma non il primo, sarebbe un'ottima idea leggere "Finzioni": vi (ri)troverà la biblioteca labirintica, le disquisizioni teologiche, l'inchiesta con la falsa pista, e altri motivi che hanno mirabilmente (mi vien da dire: vertiginosamente) ispirato Eco.… (more)
  11. 10
    Possession: A Romance by A. S. Byatt (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: Both books are cited by Michael Dirda as examples of antiquarian romance.
  12. 00
    Headlong by Michael Frayn (KayCliff)
    KayCliff: Both books are cited by Michael Dirda as examples of antiquarian romance.
  13. 11
    Shadow & Claw: The First Half of The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe (LamontCranston)
  14. 11
    Zwischen Utopie und Wirklichkeit: Konstruierte Sprachen für die globalisierte Welt by Jennifer Bretz (gangleri)
  15. 00
    The Secret Supper by Javier Sierra (Limelite)
    Limelite: Two clerics sent to investigate mysterious and secretive goings on in abbeys find death and revelation as they successfully untangle and avert the web of church politics and conflicts over man's greatest artistic and literary heritage.
  16. 22
    Doctor Mirabilis by James Blish (bertilak)
    bertilak: Both books have subplots about the controversial teachings of Joachim of Fiore.
  17. 22
    Ex-Libris by Ross King (roby72)
  18. 11
    The Athenian Murders by José Carlos Somoza (Booksloth)
  19. 11
    Interred with Their Bones by Jennifer Lee Carrell (KayCliff)
  20. 11
    A Time to Keep Silence by Patrick Leigh Fermor (Laura400)
    Laura400: A brief book that relates this 20th Century author's travels to four monasteries, including extended stays in two French Benedictine monasteries. It is not a mystery or a book like "The Name of The Rose." But it is a nice meditation on a way of life that appears nearly unchanged over the centuries.… (more)

(see all 29 recommendations)

1980s (2)
Europe (182)
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English (192)  Spanish (17)  Italian (16)  French (8)  Dutch (5)  German (5)  Catalan (2)  Swedish (2)  Portuguese (Portugal) (2)  Danish (2)  Portuguese (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (253)
Showing 1-5 of 192 (next | show all)
Two or three years ago I was discussing literature in the pub with an Italian friend of mine. He was struggling with something by Ernest Hemingway and somewhere along the lines we got onto the relative merits of English speaking versus Italian speaking authors. I admitted that the only Italian work I'd ever read was Dante's [b:The Divine Comedy|32811|The Divine Comedy |Dante Alighieri|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1168393807s/32811.jpg|809248], which I thought was a wonderful work but not quite as good as the only comparable English work I'd read: [b:Paradise Lost|421012|Paradise Lost |John Milton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1174590274s/421012.jpg|1031493]. I could tell my friend disagreed because he gesticulated even more wildly than usual while saying "I disagree." Always willing to collect more empirical evidence I asked him for some slightly more contemporary Italian authors to try out, and he gave me one name: Umberto Eco.

The two specific books that were mentioned at the time were [b:Foucault's Pendulum|10504|Foucault's Pendulum|Umberto Eco|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1166253875s/10504.jpg|11221066] and this one, The Name of the Rose. The former, he said, was like [b:The Da Vinci Code|269831|The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2)|Dan Brown|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1308807869s/269831.jpg|2982101] but a lot more high-brow; the latter, meanwhile, was better. For reasons lost in the cider-flavoured haze of time, I decided to read Foucault's Pendulum first. I enjoyed it but sometimes my brow could not quite climb high enough to fully appreciate the book. And now I've read The Name of the Rose, and it was better.

The book is a murder-mystery novel, starring William "the Hound" of Baskerville as a former inquisitor who, visiting an Italian abbey as part of a fairly pointless sub-plot, is asked by the abbot to investigate the recent death of a young monk. The abbey turns out to be a seething cauldron of discontent full of intrigue and inappropriate behaviour. And much of the intrigue centres on a library large enough to make a bibliophile blush.

William is a walking homage to Sherlock Holmes, from his name down to his use of logic and the latest scientific gadgets to solve the murder. Unfortunately logic and scientific gadgets were not so plentiful in fourteenth century Europe. William audibly struggles to coherently explain modus ponendo tollens to his simple sidekick-narrator Dr John H. Adso, and about the only gadget he ever uses is a pair of spectacles. Moreover there is no triumphant scene at the end where all the suspects are collected in one room and it turns out the butler did it (you can't trust butlers, believe me). Instead William figures out the logistics of the crimes but stumbles upon the murderer - by his own admission - pretty much by chance.

In some sense this book is to Sherlock Holmes what Foucault's Pendulum is to The Da Vinci Code. In neither case would I necessarily recommend the Eco book to someone who had enjoyed the non-Eco book. I'm certainly not sure this is a book that would be enjoyed by someone because they liked murder mystery stories. But I am pretty certain that it would be enjoyed by someone because they liked well written, detailed prose, and an interesting exploration of the unchanging essence of human nature. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
Two or three years ago I was discussing literature in the pub with an Italian friend of mine. He was struggling with something by Ernest Hemingway and somewhere along the lines we got onto the relative merits of English speaking versus Italian speaking authors. I admitted that the only Italian work I'd ever read was Dante's [b:The Divine Comedy|32811|The Divine Comedy |Dante Alighieri|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1168393807s/32811.jpg|809248], which I thought was a wonderful work but not quite as good as the only comparable English work I'd read: [b:Paradise Lost|421012|Paradise Lost |John Milton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1174590274s/421012.jpg|1031493]. I could tell my friend disagreed because he gesticulated even more wildly than usual while saying "I disagree." Always willing to collect more empirical evidence I asked him for some slightly more contemporary Italian authors to try out, and he gave me one name: Umberto Eco.

The two specific books that were mentioned at the time were [b:Foucault's Pendulum|10504|Foucault's Pendulum|Umberto Eco|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1166253875s/10504.jpg|11221066] and this one, The Name of the Rose. The former, he said, was like [b:The Da Vinci Code|269831|The Da Vinci Code (Robert Langdon, #2)|Dan Brown|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1308807869s/269831.jpg|2982101] but a lot more high-brow; the latter, meanwhile, was better. For reasons lost in the cider-flavoured haze of time, I decided to read Foucault's Pendulum first. I enjoyed it but sometimes my brow could not quite climb high enough to fully appreciate the book. And now I've read The Name of the Rose, and it was better.

The book is a murder-mystery novel, starring William "the Hound" of Baskerville as a former inquisitor who, visiting an Italian abbey as part of a fairly pointless sub-plot, is asked by the abbot to investigate the recent death of a young monk. The abbey turns out to be a seething cauldron of discontent full of intrigue and inappropriate behaviour. And much of the intrigue centres on a library large enough to make a bibliophile blush.

William is a walking homage to Sherlock Holmes, from his name down to his use of logic and the latest scientific gadgets to solve the murder. Unfortunately logic and scientific gadgets were not so plentiful in fourteenth century Europe. William audibly struggles to coherently explain modus ponendo tollens to his simple sidekick-narrator Dr John H. Adso, and about the only gadget he ever uses is a pair of spectacles. Moreover there is no triumphant scene at the end where all the suspects are collected in one room and it turns out the butler did it (you can't trust butlers, believe me). Instead William figures out the logistics of the crimes but stumbles upon the murderer - by his own admission - pretty much by chance.

In some sense this book is to Sherlock Holmes what Foucault's Pendulum is to The Da Vinci Code. In neither case would I necessarily recommend the Eco book to someone who had enjoyed the non-Eco book. I'm certainly not sure this is a book that would be enjoyed by someone because they liked murder mystery stories. But I am pretty certain that it would be enjoyed by someone because they liked well written, detailed prose, and an interesting exploration of the unchanging essence of human nature. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
Angry catholics,
murdered monks, dangerous books
thanks, Google Translate. ( )
1 vote Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
I was torn between superb story-telling (from the author who claimed my respect in "Prague Cemetery") and my tepid interest in the type of characters in this historical novel, namely Christian monks of middle ages, and their problems. But the intricate plot, two inquisitive and bright protagonists (a master and a young novice monk) and the engaging narrative have won, and after 500 pages of the book, I went on to read The Postscript, where the title of the novel is tackled, along with other interesting issues, like how the author "furnished the world" for his historical novel, etc. Defending his choice of the title, Eco says: "A narrator should not supply interpretation of his work, otherwise he would not have written a novel, which is a machine for generating interpretations", and "A title must muddle the reader's ideas, not regiment them" - while the slight hint of the title is only at the very end of the book.

I can't help but offer a quote from the book (it comes in the first pages, and keep in mind - the time is late 1300s when the narrator, now a very aged monk, writes his story about events in 1327 when he was a young novice monk):

"In the past men were handsome and great (now they are children and dwarfs), but this is merely one of the many facts that demonstrate the disaster of an aging world. The young no longer want to study anything, learning is in decline, the whole world walks on its head, blind men lead others equally blind and cause them to plunge into the abyss, birds leave the nest before they can fly, the jackass plays the lyre, oxen dance. Mary no longer loves the contemplative life and Martha no longer loves the active life, Leah is sterile, Rachel has a carnal eye, Cato visits brothers, Lucretius becomes a woman. Everything is on the wrong path. In those days, thank God, I acquired from my master the desire to learn adn a sense of the straight way, which remains even when the path is tortuous."

And, just for fun: "He had perhaps seen fifty springs, and was therefore already very old...." ( )
3 vote Clara53 | Jun 18, 2020 |
Daß er in den Mauern der prächtigen Benediktinerabtei an den Hängen des Apennin das Echo eines verschollenen Lachens hören würde, das hell und klassisch herüberklingt aus der Antike, damit hat der englische Franziskanermönch William von Baskerville nicht gerechnet. Zusammen mit Adson von Melk, seinem etwas tumben, jugendlichen Adlatus, ist er in einer höchst delikaten politischen Mission unterwegs. Doch in den sieben Tagen ihres Aufenthalts werden die beiden mit kriminellen Ereignissen und drastischen Versuchungen konfrontiert: Ein Mönch ist im Schweineblutbottich ertrunken, ein anderer aus dem Fenster gesprungen, ein dritter wird tot im Badehaus gefunden. Aber nicht umsonst stand William lange Jahre im Dienste der heiligen Inquisition. Das Untersuchungsfieber packt ihn. Er sammelt Indizien, entziffert magische Zeichen, entschlüsselt Manuskripte und dringt immer tiefer in ein geheimnisvolles Labyrinth vor, über das der blinde Seher Jorge von Burgos wacht
  Fredo68 | May 14, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 192 (next | show all)
The Name of the Rose is a monumental exercise in mystification by a fun-loving scholar.
added by Shortride | editTime, Patricia Blake (Jun 13, 1983)
 
One may find some of the digressions a touch self-indulgent... yet be carried along by Mr. Eco's knowledge and narrative skills. And if at the end the solution strikes the reader as more edifying than plausible, he has already received ample compensation from a richly stocked and eminently civilized intelligence.
 
The Jesuits didn’t exist in William of Baskerville’s time, but – learned in Aquinas and Aristotle and prepared to use the empirical techniques of Roger Bacon – William would make a very good English Jesuit. Although in orders, he lacks the rotundity, Wildean paradoxicality and compassion of Father Brown, but clearly Dr Eco knows his Chesterton. Theology and criminal detection go, for some reason, well together...

I probably do not need to recommend this book to British readers. The impetus of foreign success should ensure a large readership here. Even Ulster rednecks, to say nothing of mild Anglicans who detest Christianity cooking with garlic, will feel comforted by this image of a secure age when there was an answer to everything, when small, walled society could be self-sufficient, and the only pollution was diabolic. Patriots will be pleased to find such a society in need of British pragmatism.
added by SnootyBaronet | editObserver, Anthony Burgess
 

» Add other authors (41 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eco, UmbertoAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Alexanderson, EvaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Čale, MoranaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buffa, AiraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frýbort, ZdenìkTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jason, NevilleNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Middelthon, CarstenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pochtar, RicardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
SanjulianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schifano, Jean-NoëlTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tuin, JennyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Velthoven, Th. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vlot, HennyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voogd, Pietha deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weaver, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Костюкович… ЕленаTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
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Books are not made to be believed, but to be subjected to inquiry. When we consider a book, we mustn’t ask ourselves what it says but what it means.
There are magic moments, involving great physical fatigue and intense motor excitement, that produce visions of people known in the past. As I learned later from the delightful little book of the Abbé de Bucquoy, there are also visions of books as yet unwritten.
not infrequently, books speak of books: it is as if they spoke among themselves.
I have seen many other fragments of the cross in other churches. If all were genuine, our Lord’s torment could not have been on a couple of planks nailed together, but on an entire forest.
In my country [Austria], when you joke you say something and then you laugh very noisily so everyone shares in your joke. William [a Briton] laughed only when he said serious things, and remained very serious when he was presumably joking.
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In 1327, finding his sensitive mission at an Italian abbey further complicated by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William of Baskerville turns detective.

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This is a mystery wherein several deaths, presumed to be murders, are investigated by a former inquisitor, Brother William, at the request of the Abbot who wishes, for political reasons, to resolve the deaths and their attendant scandals before the arrival of a Papal delegation.
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