HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of…
Loading...

Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga and Graphic Novels (original 2006; edition 2006)

by Scott McCloud

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,5051912,137 (4.24)14
"Magnificent! The best how-to manual ever published." -- Kevin Kelly, Cool Tools Scott McCloud tore down the wall between high and low culture in 1993 with Understanding Comics, a massive comic book about comics, linking the medium to such diverse fields as media theory, movie criticism, and web design. In Reinventing Comics, McCloud took this to the next level, charting twelve different revolutions in how comics are generated, read, and perceived today. Now, in Making Comics, McCloud focuses his analysis on the art form itself, exploring the creation of comics, from the broadest principles to the sharpest details (like how to accentuate a character's facial muscles in order to form the emotion of disgust rather than the emotion of surprise.) And he does all of it in his inimitable voice and through his cartoon stand-in narrator, mixing dry humor and legitimate instruction. McCloud shows his reader how to master the human condition through word and image in a brilliantly minimalistic way. Both comic book devotees and the uninitiated will marvel at this journey into a once-underappreciated art form.… (more)
Member:donutage
Title:Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga and Graphic Novels
Authors:Scott McCloud
Info:Harper Paperbacks (2006), Paperback
Collections:Moorestown
Rating:****
Tags:21c, aesthetics, american, authors I have met, comics, media theory, nonfiction, criticism

Work Information

Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels by Scott McCloud (2006)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 14 mentions

English (18)  Spanish (1)  All languages (19)
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
After reading Scott McCloud’s Making Comics I have a much deeper appreciation for artists who produce comic books, manga, and graphic novels. There is the story to be told, drawings to illustrate, and dialogue to create… all with style. McCloud, a comic book artist with over twenty years under his belt, has written a guide for aspiring comic book artists in creating their own works – and he has largely done so humorously in comic book form. Discusses unique use of panels to tell a story, tools of the trade, perspective drawing, and special tricks to deliver the message. Includes many examples from other artists. Very well annotated and glossed, including art credits, bibliography and recommended reading. Although I have no illusions of drawing comics myself, I have much better understanding of how to read them, what to notice, and above all, better appreciate the talent this book form requires. ( )
  mimo | Dec 18, 2023 |
McCloud's series explaining the ways of graphic storytelling is an invaluable resource for anyone wanting to teach, create, or discuss comics and graphic novels. Understanding Comics is more about theory of visual art; Making Comics is a primer on technique. Regardless, I found the vocabulary / terminology useful if you want to teach visual analysis. I also really appreciated the sections on manga, which goes into the genre's history and web of influences. ( )
  jonbrammer | Jul 1, 2023 |
I read this book as a way of understanding the form of the comic, not necessarily as a how-to guide for making any. I have no intention of learning how to draw, so I don't know if I got quite as much out of this book as others might. However it's an interesting "textbook" that uses style and formatting just as much as substance to make its point.

My favorite thing about the book by far is it's personal narrative style. This was used for instruction in a college course, so it was a nice break from the basic textbook. The narrator is openly giving his personal opinion, while explaining the history and context behind it. There's plenty of facts given in the book, but lots of the underlying conclusions are admittedly subjective. One part, early on in the book, literally has a fictional crowd calling out and criticizing his definitions. It's a rhetorical device meant to explain the different components of comics and why he eventually comes to the definition he does, but it's also a view on his perspective. Scott McCloud does not view himself as an infallible expert, but as somebody with information to share. At one point shortly after that, he not only accepts criticism but says that the reader is encouraged to disagree with him.

It makes the education aspect feel more genuine. It's not missing any pieces of information, because it's not trying to be the end-all-be-all of this subject. It's a singular voice the entire time, walking you through the history and process of comics.

Beyond that, it's alright. It makes interesting points and teaches me things I didn't know about the common tropes of this wide reaching genre. However, it it's a transcendent work and like I said, as a student and not an artist there were parts I wasn't as drawn in by. ( )
  MaxAndBradley | May 27, 2020 |
It's no Understanding Comics, for sure. And it's aimed more at the aspiring comics creator than the casual reader. But! McCloud's always got a crisp take on the art that's fun to read and easy to absorb and does shed extra light on how comics work. A good, fast read. ( )
  chasing | Jan 18, 2016 |
Building upon his theories within Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud gives a look into the art of making comics in this tome.

He breaks it apart by reviewing storytelling, panels, use of words and dialogue, character designs, facial expression, and much more.

This book is a must-have for anyone wanting to make comics. Reading his earlier books is helpful but not required. ( )
  maxwestart | Aug 13, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
For Will Eisner
First words
So you want to make comics?
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
"Magnificent! The best how-to manual ever published." -- Kevin Kelly, Cool Tools Scott McCloud tore down the wall between high and low culture in 1993 with Understanding Comics, a massive comic book about comics, linking the medium to such diverse fields as media theory, movie criticism, and web design. In Reinventing Comics, McCloud took this to the next level, charting twelve different revolutions in how comics are generated, read, and perceived today. Now, in Making Comics, McCloud focuses his analysis on the art form itself, exploring the creation of comics, from the broadest principles to the sharpest details (like how to accentuate a character's facial muscles in order to form the emotion of disgust rather than the emotion of surprise.) And he does all of it in his inimitable voice and through his cartoon stand-in narrator, mixing dry humor and legitimate instruction. McCloud shows his reader how to master the human condition through word and image in a brilliantly minimalistic way. Both comic book devotees and the uninitiated will marvel at this journey into a once-underappreciated art form.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.24)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 1
3 31
3.5 7
4 96
4.5 12
5 101

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 205,989,759 books! | Top bar: Always visible