HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Big news! LibraryThing is now free to all! Read the blog post and discuss the change on Talk.
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Relatedness in Assisted Reproduction:…
Loading...

Relatedness in Assisted Reproduction: Families, Origins and Identities

by Tabitha Freeman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
5None2,247,074NoneNone
"Assisted reproduction challenges and reinforces traditional understandings of family, kinship and identity. Sperm, egg and embryo donation and surrogacy raise questions about relatedness for parents, children and others involved in creating and raising a child. How socially, morally or psychologically significant is a genetic link between a donor-conceived child and their donor? What should children born through assisted reproduction be told about their origins? Does it matter if a parent is genetically unrelated to their child? How do experiences differ for men and women using collaborative reproduction in heterosexual or same-sex couples, single parent families or co-parenting arrangements? What impact does the wider cultural, socio-legal and regulatory context have? In this multidisciplinary book, an international team of academics and clinicians bring together new empirical research and social science, legal and bioethical perspectives to explore the key issue of relatedness in assisted reproduction"-- "Assisted reproduction challenges and reinforces traditional understandings of family and kinship. Sperm, egg and embryo donation and surrogacy raise questions about relatedness for parents, children and other people who may be involved in the conception, gestation and care of a child. How socially, morally or psychologically significant is a genetic link between a donor-conceived child and their donor? What difference does it make if this link is with an egg donor or a sperm donor? What does it mean for a parent to be genetically unrelated to their child? What should offspring born through assisted reproduction be told about their origins and is such information important for their identity? How is kinship experienced by men and women using collaborative reproduction in heterosexual couples, same-sex couples or single parent families? How does the wider cultural, socio-legal and regulatory context impact on these experiences?"--… (more)
Recently added byalicekeller, bioethics

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

LibraryThing Author

Tabitha Freeman is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 146,482,487 books! | Top bar: Always visible