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Ancillary mercy by Ann Leckie
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Ancillary mercy (edition 2015)

by Ann Leckie

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1,358808,893 (4.18)122
"For a moment, things seemed to be under control for Breq, the soldier who used to be a warship. Then a search of Athoek Station's slums turns up someone who shouldn't exist, and a messenger from the mysterious Presger empire arrives, as does Breq's enemy, the divided and quite possibly insane Anaander Mianaai--ruler of an empire at war with itself"--Page 4 of cover.In the stunning conclusion to the Imperial Radch trilogy, a search of Athoek Station's slums turns up someone who shouldn't exist. A messenger from the mysterious Presger empire arrives, as does Breq's enemy, the divided and quite possibly insane Anaander Mianaai, ruler of an empire at war with itself. Breq refuses to flee with her ship and crew, because that would leave the people of Athoek in terrible danger. The odds aren't good, but that's never stopped her before.… (more)
Member:evareads
Title:Ancillary mercy
Authors:Ann Leckie
Info:New York, NY Orbit October 2015
Collections:Your library
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Tags:science fiction

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Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie

  1. 20
    The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both are optimistic space operas that focus on the characters and their relationships.
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Showing 1-5 of 79 (next | show all)
Strong end to a fantastic trilogy. Along with developing everything that Sword set up, it does a fantastic job of deploying comedy. I can think of very few other writers who've managed to have real laugh-out-loud comic relief that not only doesn't detract from all the serious things in the book but actually develops the plot and builds the world further.

I really want to read more about the Presger, and to read a book or short story that looks at Breq through other characters' eyes. ( )
1 vote eldang | Sep 18, 2019 |
Strong end to a fantastic trilogy. Along with developing everything that Sword set up, it does a fantastic job of deploying comedy. I can think of very few other writers who've managed to have real laugh-out-loud comic relief that not only doesn't detract from all the serious things in the book but actually develops the plot and builds the world further.

I really want to read more about the Presger, and to read a book or short story that looks at Breq through other characters' eyes. ( )
  eldang | Aug 11, 2019 |
Ann Leckie continues building on the foundation set by Ancillary Justice and Ancillary Sword to close out the trilogy. Again, I enjoyed the focus on social themes and revolution in this concluding chapter. World-building, characters, and pacing is great as always. Great conclusion to a wonderful series. ( )
  aagbay | Jul 25, 2019 |
Ancillary Mercy is better than Ancillary Sword, but I'm wondering if Ann Leckie was a one-hit wonder-- neither the Ancillary books 2-3 nor Provenance were anywhere near as good as Ancillary Justice. I feel as if after Justice, she just had no idea where to go; that's how it reads, anyway. The stakes in Sword/Mercy (which basically forms one big story) are technically higher than those in Justice; in Justice, Breq was just out for her own satisfaction/vengeance, whereas in Mercy, she's fighting to save a solar system. But in Justice, the stakes felt higher because of Breq's personal need to do this; the climax of that book was one of the most intense reading experiences I can remember having in ages. The big problem of Sword/Mercy is that there's no strong personal involvement for Breq. She was sent to this solar system arbitrarily as far as we can; I don't really have a reason to care if it can be protected from Anaannder Mianaai.

Part of the problem in Mercy goes back to Sword. It didn't feel like Breq had to fight for anything in that book, so why should I care if it's taken away from her? In Justice, what she did was hard work. In Sword, she was easily right every time. It would have been nice to see Breq struggle to be a captain, because surely the service-based attitude one needs to be a good ship is different than the leadership-based attitude one needs to be a good captain. But Breq doesn't struggle; she's just a good captain from the word "go." Thankfully, Mercy reverses this somewhat, but it's still annoying. A morally right character who struggles to implement justice is sympathetic. A morally right character who always gets her way is smug and obnoxious.

The shame of it all is that Leckie does great, complex worldbuilding (along with Seth Dickinson, she's very much part of a movement more attentive to the details of colonialism and empire than I remember seeing in older sf) and crafts marvelous sentences. She writes great characters. I really like Seivarden, for example, and the Presger translator Zeiat was delightfully funny and alien; I laughed a lot at her antics.

I can imagine a better book 2-3 than we got-- and the very end of book 3 promises it, when Breq founds her own polity with citizenship for AI. Imagine if books 2-3 had been condensed down into one book ending where book 3 does right now. Then book 3 could have been about Breq trying to defend her own society from Anaander Mianaai and the Radch, trying to take from her the enclave of justice that she's built. That would have potentially had real emotional stakes in a way that this book does not. After reading Ancillary Justice, Leckie's work became must-buy for me... after reading the rest of it, it has lost that status. She's not a bad writer, but outside of Justice, she's not a great one, either.
  Stevil2001 | May 31, 2019 |
There's tea, more tea, some adventure, then some setting up of committees. Breq is not the only AI - her relationships deepen with Ship and the station and there is also the impenetrable mind of the alien ambassador. ( )
1 vote cindywho | May 27, 2019 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ann Leckieprimary authorall editionscalculated
Benshoff, KirkCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harris, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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One moment asleep.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Haiku summary
Spaceship friendships bloom;
Station joins in too, helping;
Thwart the evil Lord.
(pickupsticks)

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