HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Parched

by Heather King

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1548140,905 (3.51)2
One woman's journey to the bottom of the bottle--and back.   In this tragicomic memoir about alcoholism as spiritual thirst, Heather King--writer, lawyer, and National Public Radio commentator--describes her descent into the depths of addiction. Spanning a decades-long downward spiral, King's harrowing story takes us from a small-town New England childhood to hitchhiking across the country to a cockroach-ridden "artist's" loft in Boston. Waitressing at ever-shabbier restaurants, deriving what sustenance she could from books, she became a morning regular at a wet-brain-drunks' bar--and that was after graduating from law school.   Saved by her family from the abyss, King finally realized that uniquely poetic, sensitive, and profound though she may have been, she was also a big-time mess. Casting her lot with the rest of humanity at last, she learned that suffering leads to redemption, that personal pain leads to compassion for others in pain, and, above all, that a sense of humor really, really helps.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Heather King is so thoroughly honest in her deeply personal memoir that she really gives the impression of what it was like to walk in her shoes as she struggled with alcohol abuse. When an autobiography is this personal, it’s hard to say it could have been better because that almost feels like a judgment on the author’s life. I feel as though Heather King shared exactly the right amount. If you have a friend or family member who struggles with substance use and want to know what it’s like to walk in their shoes, read this memoir.

Favorite Quote: “Books were the closest thing I had to God–even at my worst I still made a pilgrimage to the public library every week or so for a fresh stack–and O’Connor was my heroine, literary and otherwise. I had read her short stories so many times that her characters…were more real to me than people I had actually met, and though I could not imagine being a Catholic, or understanding the Gospels, or living like a monk in a Georgia dairy farm the way she had, her fierce faith and unwavering convictions inspired in me the utmost respect.” — Reviewed by SBBookGirlErin ( )
  GalsGuidetotheGalaxy | Oct 14, 2021 |
Very good. About an alcoholic woman who recovered. Catholic. About her life now. She is a writer. ( )
  avdesertgirl | Aug 22, 2021 |
this a great little drug/alcohol memoir, not as well known as dry or a million little pieces, but it should be. she's a solid writer and it's an interesting story. a lot of boston in it, and, for whatever reason, i like that.

page turner too. ( )
  Joseph_W_Naus | Jul 20, 2016 |
I had read a fairly good review of Parched in my bar association's newsletter, which noted the author had made it through law school in a drunken stupor. The law school portion of her life takes up only a few pages in the book, though the rest of the book is alternately fascinating and repelling.

King starts drinking in high school and stays partially inebriated for the next twenty years. We see her life -- filthy living conditions, going-nowhere jobs -- through her caustic wit. She's quite perceptive in seeing the flaws of others (and is quite comical doing so), but she never manages to turn that gaze inward. It takes a family intervention (which mostly ends the book, a bit too quickly) to dry her out.

It's interesting to see how other people live, and this story takes us close to the lowest depths in our modern society. It's a captivating story at times. But I'm hesitant to offer this as pre-reading for law school, as the author got through those three years and passed the bar exam wasted, and that's probably not the best message to send. ( )
  legallypuzzled | Sep 14, 2014 |
If you're looking for a sometimes funny, seemingly honest account of someone's struggle with alcohol this is a good book. If you're looking for the next car wreck to be more spectacular than the last you might want to look for whatever current author has made up their life story to entertain you. I'm going to guess that recovering alcoholics will like this book more than soap opera fans. If you're both, then I'm not sure.
( )
  bongo_x | Apr 6, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

One woman's journey to the bottom of the bottle--and back.   In this tragicomic memoir about alcoholism as spiritual thirst, Heather King--writer, lawyer, and National Public Radio commentator--describes her descent into the depths of addiction. Spanning a decades-long downward spiral, King's harrowing story takes us from a small-town New England childhood to hitchhiking across the country to a cockroach-ridden "artist's" loft in Boston. Waitressing at ever-shabbier restaurants, deriving what sustenance she could from books, she became a morning regular at a wet-brain-drunks' bar--and that was after graduating from law school.   Saved by her family from the abyss, King finally realized that uniquely poetic, sensitive, and profound though she may have been, she was also a big-time mess. Casting her lot with the rest of humanity at last, she learned that suffering leads to redemption, that personal pain leads to compassion for others in pain, and, above all, that a sense of humor really, really helps.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.51)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 6
2.5
3 9
3.5 3
4 13
4.5 1
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,326,039 books! | Top bar: Always visible