HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Gun Street Girl by Adrian McKinty
Loading...

Gun Street Girl

by Adrian McKinty

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Sean Duffy (4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
15714108,379 (4.15)15

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 15 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
whew. ( )
  kerns222 | May 25, 2018 |
This series just keeps getting better and better. And more bang for my buck, a history lesson along with the entertainment. That ending though!!

I highly recommend listening to the audio version over reading if you do audio as well. Gerard Doyle does an excellent job with the narration and I just love soaking in the accent and language or Ireland. ( )
  she_climber | Feb 7, 2018 |
This is Sean Duffy's fourth case. He got his old job back at the RUC Carrickfergus, but his superiors are not necessarily happy about it. When a new murder happened, Duffy leaves the primary responsibility to his friend McCrabban and pulls the strings in the background. He is different authorities on their toes and makes more enemies than friends. There are many dead in this case, all of which can be associated with missing rockets. He is not only investigating this in Northern Ireland but also in Oxford and Scotland.
As always exciting written and lets you guess until the end. ( )
  Ameise1 | Dec 29, 2017 |
Yes, I've read it before - and I'll probably read it again. ( )
  AmberMcWilliams | May 22, 2017 |
Not that they aren’t fully formed works of art in their own right but I find the best way to get in the mood for a Sean Duffy story is to first listen to the Tom Waits song from which the book’s title is taken. Not so much to hear the title in a lyrical context (though that is always a pleasure) but to start the process of sinking into Duffy’s world. His way of thinking and observing life. Duffy and Waits share some characteristics; both favouring the dark, even grotesque elements of human nature. Though Duffy is, I think, more likely to soften his observations with humour. Mostly gallows humour it must be said. But bloody funny nonetheless.

It is 1985. Four years since readers first met Sean Duffy. Though he has been through much more than the average person might do in a whole lifetime and not just because he’s the lone Catholic cop in a Belfast police station at the height of the troubles. Though that doesn’t help. Even at a church social for singles the women steer clear. And Duffy doesn’t blame them. As a Catholic policeman “…[his] life expectancy could be measured in dog years“. Little wonder he relies on vodka gimlets and the odd line of cocaine to see him through the day.

In GUN STREET GIRL Duffy and his colleagues are presented with a mystery wrapped in politics and greed; the usual mess for them to unravel. Though at first it looks like nothing much at all. Michael Kelly shot and killed his parents then jumped off a cliff. Then his girlfriend gases herself to death in her car. Or perhaps not. The Carrickfergus station’s newest recruit, DC Lawson, spots some inconsistencies at the latest crime scene and he and DS McCrabban convince Duffy there is more to this situation than meets the eye. And so they dive into a world of arms dealers and spooks and mysterious Americans. While the rest of the city riots. Again.

This series, and perhaps this book most strongly, has a sense of authenticity. The backdrop – bureaucratic madness disguised as strategic thinking and Thatcher’s iron will forcing itself into every corner of the not-so united Kingdom – is entirely realistic. It’s easy too to believe that the things Sean Duffy sees and experiences might very well have happened, even if not all to the same person. And for those readers who lived through the 80’s the cultural references, especially the music, offer the closest thing to time travel any of us are likely to get.

From its opening debacle to its final sadness GUN STREET GIRL had me hooked. At times it is variously funny, heart-breaking, worrying, scary and maddening. But most of all it is a ripper of a ride. And if you like voices in your head there is no better combination than Gerard Doyle as Sean Duffy.
  bsquaredinoz | Mar 30, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Adrian McKintyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Doyle, GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
I do not yet know what your gift is to me, but mine to you is an awesome one: you may keep your days and nights.
— Jorge Luis Borges, "Blue Tigers", 1983
Dedication
First words
Ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss . . .Silence.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"Belfast, 1985, amidst the "Troubles": Detective Sean Duffy, a Catholic cop in the Protestant RUC (Royal Ulster Constabulary), struggles with burn-out as he investigates a brutal double murder and suicide. Did Michael Kelly really shoot his parents at point blank and then jump off a nearby cliff? A suicide note points to this conclusion, but Duffy suspects even more sinister circumstances. He soon discovers that Kelly was present at a decadent Oxford party where a cabinet minister's daughter died of a heroin overdose. This may or may not have something to do with Kelly's subsequent death. New evidence leads elsewhere: gun runners, arms dealers, the British government, and a rogue American agent with a fake identity. Duffy thinks he's getting somewhere when agents from MI5 show up at his doorstep and try to recruit him, thus taking him off the investigation. Duffy is in it up to his neck, doggedly pursuing a case that may finally prove his undoing"--… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.15)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 1
3.5 5
4 32
4.5 5
5 11

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,960,818 books! | Top bar: Always visible