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Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy… (1992)

by Stephen E. Ambrose

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,537951,415 (4.21)69
Stephen E. Ambrose's iconic New York Times bestseller about the ordinary men who became the World War II's most extraordinary soldiers: Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, US Army. They came together, citizen soldiers, in the summer of 1942, drawn to Airborne by the $50 monthly bonus and a desire to be better than the other guy. And at its peak--in Holland and the Ardennes--Easy Company was as good a rifle company as any in the world. From the rigorous training in Georgia in 1942 to the disbanding in 1945, Stephen E. Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company. In combat, the reward for a job well done is the next tough assignment, and as they advanced through Europe, the men of Easy kept getting the tough assignments. They parachuted into France early D-Day morning and knocked out a battery of four 105 mm cannon looking down Utah Beach; they parachuted into Holland during the Arnhem campaign; they were the Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne, brought in to hold the line, although surrounded, in the Battle of the Bulge; and then they spearheaded the counteroffensive. Finally, they captured Hitler's Bavarian outpost, his Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden. They were rough-and-ready guys, battered by the Depression, mistrustful and suspicious. They drank too much French wine, looted too many German cameras and watches, and fought too often with other GIs. But in training and combat they learned selflessness and found the closest brotherhood they ever knew. They discovered that in war, men who loved life would give their lives for them. This is the story of the men who fought, of the martinet they hated who trained them well, and of the captain they loved who led them. E Company was a company of men who went hungry, froze, and died for each other, a company that took 150 percent casualties, a company where the Purple Heart was not a medal--it was a badge of office.… (more)
  1. 70
    Citizen Soldiers: The U. S. Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany by Stephen E. Ambrose (fmorondo)
  2. 50
    With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa by E. B. Sledge (mjmorrison1971)
    mjmorrison1971: The second piece of work used by Hanks and Speilberg for the Pacific covering the War pretty much from where Helmet for my pillow ended. Again a first hand account that does help one understand the horrors these men endured.
  3. 50
    Helmet for My Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific by Robert Leckie (mjmorrison1971)
    mjmorrison1971: Like Band of Brothers used as the basis of Tom Hanks & Steven Speilberg's work - this time the Pacific. A first hand account of some of the US Marine Corps early campaigns in the Pacific.
  4. 30
    D-Day June 6 1944: the Climatic Battle of World War II by Stephen E. Ambrose (tarheel)
  5. 20
    Hell's Highway: A Chronicle of the 101st Airborne in the Holland Campaign, September-November 1944 by George Koskimaki (TomCat14)
  6. 10
    The Battered Bastards of Bastogne: The 101st Airborne and the Battle of the Bulge, December 19,1944-January 17,1945 by George Koskimaki (TomCat14)
  7. 10
    Band of Brothers [2001 TV mini series] by Steven Spielberg (TheLittlePhrase)
  8. 21
    Ghost Soldiers: The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission by Hampton Sides (IslandDave)
  9. 10
    Rendezvous With Destiny History of the 101st Airborne Division by Leonard Rapport (TomCat14)
  10. 00
    Saving Private Ryan [1998 film] by Steven Spielberg (TheLittlePhrase)
  11. 00
    D-Day: The Battle for Normandy by Antony Beevor (tarheel)
  12. 00
    Night Drop: The American Airborne Invasion of Normandy by S. L. A. Marshall (TomCat14)
  13. 00
    D-Day with the Screaming Eagles by George Koskimaki (TomCat14)
  14. 00
    Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends by William Guarnere (cmbohn)
  15. 01
    Joker One: A Marine Platoon's Story of Courage, Leadership, and Brotherhood by Donovan Campbell (NickBlasta)
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» See also 69 mentions

English (92)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (1)  All languages (95)
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
Enjoyed the book. Loved captain Winters. Great historical account of a bad ass group of men. Would rate it higher if there was a deeper dive in a character. Guess I want to be able to connect/see myself through one of them more. ( )
  Zach-Rigo | Jul 7, 2021 |
nonfiction. WWII stories. Adventures and tragedies. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Read while at LOC in fall of 2012. Great read worth reading before watching. Surprisingly short considering they made it into a 10 part series.
  SDWets | Jan 30, 2021 |
This is not a historical book. It's a fan book of a group of people during the second world war. If you take it as the personal, filtered, account of what happened to E Company, 2nd battalion, 506th parachute infantry regiment, 101st airborne division, US army, then it's quite interesting, but when it comes to high level analysis or conclusions, I have the feeling he gets it all wrong.

In this book Stephen E. Ambrose reminds me of [a:Tom Clancy|3892|Tom Clancy|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1175466521p2/3892.jpg], what an American does can never be wrong. Since that is both stupid and ignorant as well as arrogant and rude it gives those of us with slightly more open minds some rough times.

But back to the book. The author and his co-authors (the participants in the book) tells a story about how an elite regiment is formed in the US in 1942, how it makes it through the west front from 1944 to 1945. The story, as most combat stories from any war, is a grim one. Maybe the people are tougher and more determined than many others, it seems more then likely, but at the end it's the same story.

Where the book falls through is where it reports factually, almost amused, about the looting and pillaging done by the troops after just a few chapters earlier declared how the soldier from a democratic state by design became superior soldiers from other states. It is an interesting theory but I think it's just a theory. As proof the Ambrose uses the fact that Easy company managed to repel and defeat elite soldiers from Nazi Germany. People that have been through 5 years of war. Strangely he doesn't notice how he himself writes that studies shows that the combat ability of any soldier declines after 90 combat days and after 140 is more or less gone since the soldier will only try to survive, using any means available.

There are many theories to how and why the war ended as it did and soldiers behaved as they did. This book adds nothing to those.

If you want to read about the second world war, pick up something by [a:Antony Beevor|3407|Antony Beevor|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1338559644p2/3407.jpg] for instance.

If you want to get a view of the horror of war and combat, watch the HBO series "Band of Brothers" based on this book. I believe it to be more accurate than this book. ( )
  bratell | Dec 25, 2020 |
One of the benefits of my job is that I get a week and a half off over the Christmas holiday. During these extended breaks, I sit down and watch the entire HBO series called Band of Brothers*. To me, this series is a great look at leadership and sacrifice. One of the things I had not yet done is read the book upon which the series was made. Last week, I finally had an opportunity to read Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest and I am glad that I did. The HBO series follows the book quite closely; however, the book did share some details that could not be adequately shown on film. This was the second book I had read from Stephen Ambrose. I had previously read The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany 1944-45. I like the relaxed story-like pace of his books. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Stephen E. Ambroseprimary authorall editionscalculated
Jerome, TimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"From this day to the ending of the World, ...we in it shall be remembered ...we band of brothers." –Henry V (William Shakespeare)
Dedication
To all those members of the Parachute Infantry, United States Army, 1941–1945, who wear the Purple Heart not as a decoration but as a badge of office.
First words
The men of Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, U.S. Army, came from different backgrounds.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is for the book by Stephen E. Ambrose. It is not the 2001 miniseries by Spielberg. The "Original Publication Date" is 1992, not 2001 as some users are incorrectly setting.
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Stephen E. Ambrose's iconic New York Times bestseller about the ordinary men who became the World War II's most extraordinary soldiers: Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, US Army. They came together, citizen soldiers, in the summer of 1942, drawn to Airborne by the $50 monthly bonus and a desire to be better than the other guy. And at its peak--in Holland and the Ardennes--Easy Company was as good a rifle company as any in the world. From the rigorous training in Georgia in 1942 to the disbanding in 1945, Stephen E. Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company. In combat, the reward for a job well done is the next tough assignment, and as they advanced through Europe, the men of Easy kept getting the tough assignments. They parachuted into France early D-Day morning and knocked out a battery of four 105 mm cannon looking down Utah Beach; they parachuted into Holland during the Arnhem campaign; they were the Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne, brought in to hold the line, although surrounded, in the Battle of the Bulge; and then they spearheaded the counteroffensive. Finally, they captured Hitler's Bavarian outpost, his Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden. They were rough-and-ready guys, battered by the Depression, mistrustful and suspicious. They drank too much French wine, looted too many German cameras and watches, and fought too often with other GIs. But in training and combat they learned selflessness and found the closest brotherhood they ever knew. They discovered that in war, men who loved life would give their lives for them. This is the story of the men who fought, of the martinet they hated who trained them well, and of the captain they loved who led them. E Company was a company of men who went hungry, froze, and died for each other, a company that took 150 percent casualties, a company where the Purple Heart was not a medal--it was a badge of office.

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