HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A Murder of Mages: A Novel of the Maradaine…
Loading...

A Murder of Mages: A Novel of the Maradaine Constabulary

by Marshall Ryan Maresca

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
675252,136 (3.71)6

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: A Murder of Mages
Series: Maradaine Constabulary #1
Author: Marshall Maresca
Rating: 3 of 5 Stars
Genre: YA Fantasy
Pages: 341
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


Satrine Rainey, former Intelligence Officer, wife of a former Maradaine Constable and mother of two, must forge her way into the Constabulary as an Inspector Third Class so as to provide for her family. Her husband, hurt on duty, is now a human vegetable and his superiors have hung him out to dry, financially speaking. Satrine successfully gets the job. She is paired up with Minox Welling, an uncircled mage who uses rather unorthodox investigative methods. Minox's nickname is Jinx, as he has already lost 3 partners.

They begin by investigating the murder of a mage who had his heart cut out. More murders follow, apparently without much rhyme or reason beyond them being of mages. At the same time Satrine has to worry about her deception being found out and kicked off the force.

Her deception is found out when her daughter gets involved with a college student and Satrine puts a very public stop to the relationship. The boy retaliates by telling his daddy who knows the Commisioner, whose seal Satrine forged to get her the job. It all comes crashing down and she is off the force and having to seriously think about being a prostitute to support her family.

Then she figures out what is going with the murders, discovers that her former partner is next on the list and sets out to rescue him even while not officially being on the force. She has the help of 2 other Constables and ends up saving Minox, getting reinstated in the Constabulary and bringing the murderer to justice.

There is another storyline involving Minox and another uncircled mage, but it is very much setup for future books and doesn't impact this one very much.

My Thoughts:

After my mis-adventure with the stupidity of the first Maradaine book, I came into this with extremely low expectations. It is a good thing I did.

Thankfully, none of the characters were complete idiots like the guy in the other book. However, everything, from characterers to plot to motivations, were still very simplistic. There are times I want a simple book, especially after reading one of the Malazan tomes, but there is a difference between simple and simplistic.

I was not impressed with this book at all, but I also didn't feel like throwing it out the window. That's about the only praise you'll get out of me for this. I'm done with Maresca and will leave him to those who enjoy his writing. I am not one of those people.

★★★☆☆ ( )
1 vote BookstoogeLT | Mar 10, 2018 |
Satrine Rainey is a former street rat and ex-spy. Now she is a mother and wife to Constabulary Inspector Loren who was so brutally attacked that it's a wonder that he is alive. But he is not able to support his wife and two daughters anymore so Satrine fakes her way into the post of Constabulary Inspector to be able to support her family.

I was quite looking forward to reading this book, loved the cover and the blurb was intriguing. Satrine Rainey is a very interesting character and I liked her working relationship with Minox "Jinx" Welling. I especially like that there weren't any romance in this book. Well, Satrine is married, but there isn't any instalove to ruin the book. I liked this fantasy world and its characters, but I must admit that I felt the story dragged a bit in the middle, but luckily it got better towards the end. One thing, though, I figured the bad guy quite fast, or should I say I guessed and that in a way ruined the story somewhat for me because I do like it when I'm kept in the dark. Sure I like to guess who the bad guy is, but I like twists, I want to arrive at the end and suddenly the rug is pulled out under my feet, figuratively of course.

Nevertheless, I did enjoy reading this book for the most part and I liked the world and I liked Satrine and Minox so I will, without a doubt, read the next one in the series.

3.5 stars

I received this copy from the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review! ( )
  MaraBlaise | Dec 14, 2017 |
Lately, Satrine Rainey has been a stay-at-home mom. However, life has catapulted her into an untenable situation. Her husband, a police officer of the city of Maradaine's Constabulary, has suffered an on-the-job injury leaving him severely disabled. Unfortunately, while Maradaine offers something like life insurance, disability insurance isn't a thing.

The force has offered Satrine a 'minimum-wage' clerk's position - but that won't pay for the family's rent and grocery bills, let alone the full-time caretaker her husband now needs, or her two daughters' tuition fees. Satrine comes up with an audacious solution: she'll lie and bluff her way into a full-time Inspector's position on the force. Satrine's former career as a spy aids her in this endeavor.

Just as she takes her new desk, and meets her new partner - a man ominously nicknamed 'The Jinx' - a new case comes across their messy desk. A mage has been murdered, in a particularly gruesome way which hints at magical ritual. And soon, it looks like they have a serial killer on their hands.

Solving the case may be the only hope Satrine has at proving herself and making it past her probationary period. It also may be the only way to save a great many lives.

The book is very much a genre mystery with a fantasy setting. It's more of a 'follow-the-action' than a 'keep track and figure out the clues' mystery, but I'm fine with that. It moves along quickly, has likable and appealing characters, and is overall, great fun. I'd definitely read the sequels!

Many thanks to NetGalley and DAW for the opportunity to read this book, which I'd heard good things about. As always, my opinion is solely my own. ( )
  AltheaAnn | Feb 9, 2016 |
Review from Tenacious Reader: http://www.tenaciousreader.com/2015/06/15/review-murder-of-mages-by-marshall-rya...

3.5/5 stars

I should preface this review to clearly state that detective stories are more often a miss for me than a hit. I decided to give this one a try because I really enjoyed The Thorn of Dentonhill and was excited to explore more of the city/world.

Murder of Mages takes places after The Thorn of Dentonhill, and while it can definitely be read separately, there are cases and events that are referred to that happened in the the other series. Mysterious murders and such. It was amusing to get the perspective of the Inspectors trying to puzzle out the remnants from some of the action scenes from TToDH.

The story introduces us to Satrine Rainey, the wife of an Inspector that has been grievously injured, leaving him pretty much comatose. Faced with both the loss of her husband’s income and the sudden need to play caretaker to her spouse, while continuing to try and provide for and raise their daughters (now alone), Satrine is faced with some difficult choices on how to keep her family off the streets. What you quickly learn is about Satrine is that she is not one to give up. If there’s not an agreeable option before her, she will find a way to make one. So, that is what she does. She has a very unique background, growing up on the streets and then being trained and serving in Intelligence as a spy. She is certainly not without skills. So, she finagles her way in to an Inspector position across town. One that will pay well enough to support her family.

Her partner, Minox Welling (aka “Jinx”) is an eccentric man that initially appears to be the joke of the Inspectors office. It is quite clear that she is paired with him because no one else is willing to work with him. He earned the nickname Jinx because none of his partners last long. But, as we get to know him, there is a serious method to his madness and he is quite bright. It is also revealed that he is an Uncircled Mage, which adds a very interesting dynamic. I grew to really like Minox, he’s the misunderstood, undervalued, slightly odd character that proves himself to be more than what others seem to think of him.

Now, here comes what didn’t work well for me. This book was very explain-y (I don’t care if that’s not a word. I’m using it). The inspectors would spell out motives and theories, and then come to conclusions that by this point were clear enough that any one should see them coming a mile away. Then they would act like it was ingenious and none of the other inspectors could possible be as smart as they are. Sigh. Maybe it wasn’t actually that extreme, because as I said earlier, I often don’t do well with detective stories but this was my honest reaction.

But, set the detective parts aside, I enjoyed this. I liked Minox, I loved Satrine’s character. It is a change of pace getting a female lead character that is also a mother and is fully devoted to her husband, even when him being pretty much gone despite still being there in body. I also enjoyed the parallels to the other series. So, despite a bit of eye rolling with the detective work, I did like this book. I also think there’s a very good chance I will read the subsequent books because I’m quite curious about the characters in this one and want to know what happens next for them. ( )
  tenaciousreader | Jun 24, 2015 |
A Murder of Mages is the first book of a series dedicated to the Maradaine Constabulary, set in the same wonderful world as Marshall Ryan Maresca’s debut novel The Thorn of Dentonhill. No need to read one before the other, though; that’s the beauty of it. Despite their shared setting, the series are companions to one another, each featuring separate stories and starring completely different characters.

And having read both books now, I can say they are both equally great. However, A Murder of Mages might have just the slightest itty-bitty edge here, since I admit a penchant for detective stories, not to mention a super soft spot for lady cops.

One of the main protagonists is Satrine Rainey – a wife, a mother of two, and a former street rat and ex-spy. After her constable husband suffers a grave injury in the line of duty, it is up to Satrine to figure out a way to support and care for the family. Using her skills, she is able to fake her way into the Maradaine Constabulary to land herself a job as an Inspector third class, where she is promptly paired up with another inspector who no one wanted to partner with – Minox Welling, an Uncircled mage nicknamed Jinx because his past partners have all met with unfortunate accidents.

Her first day on the job, Satrine is sent out with Minox to the streets where she grew up to investigate the body of a mage found in an alley, staked to the ground with his heart cut out. When more victims of these ritual murders are discovered, a deadly game of cat and mouse ensues as the inspectors race against time to track down the elusive killer.

Once again, the author is able to create something altogether unique and fresh by adding his own twist to a familiar idea like the male and female crime-solving duo. I enjoyed the dynamics in the relationship between Satrine and Minox, especially since we know right off the bat that it will be a platonic one. The narrative makes it clear that Satrine has a disabled husband at home who she is deeply devoted to, which in and of itself is an intriguing albeit heartbreaking element to throw into the mix.

Satrine is genuinely one of the most fascinating characters I’ve ever met. Without overwhelming us with details, Maresca gives us a glimpse into her rough childhood as a street urchin. After she was recruited by the Druth Intelligence and doing her stint as a spy, Satrine met and married Loren Rainey and they had two daughters. In light of the devastating accident that leaves Satrine as the sole provider and caregiver for her husband and their girls, I really couldn’t blame her for deceiving the Constabulary to get her job under false pretenses. A mother wants the best for her children, and in Satrine’s case she wanted to give Rian and Caribet a good life and a good education, the sort of opportunities Satrine could only dream about when she was their age. It’s hard to fault her for those sentiments.

I didn’t get as deep of a feel for Minox Welling, but he’s a great character as well. Mages are a complex class in these Maradaine novels, as evidenced by the protagonist of Maresca’s first novel The Thorn of Dentonhill. Through Minox the reader was able to get a better feel for how mages fit in this society. Uncircled mages like him appear to be treated with disdain (you’re either a failure, in hiding, or a late-bloomer – none of which are good to be) and even Circled mages seem feared and distrusted by the local populace. Having a child who is a mage is even a source of shame for some families.

Having two series in tandem is certainly a remarkable way to build a world, but it is also very effective. Despite not being a sequel or even a follow up to The Thorn of Dentonhill, A Murder of Mages added a lot to what we know of Maradaine, providing a look at the everyday hustle and bustle of its citizenry from all walks of life. Marshall Ryan Maresca has a true knack for creating rich settings as well as characters that feel very real and well-rounded. There’s always something special to the people he writes about, whether they are mage students or constable inspectors. A Murder of Mages was another hit for me, a fantastic read from a new talent whose star continues to be on the rise. ( )
  stefferoo | Jun 16, 2015 |
Showing 5 of 5
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0756410274, Mass Market Paperback)

A Murder of Mages marks the debut of Marshall Ryan Maresca’s novels of The Maradaine Constabulary, his second series set amid the bustling streets and crime-ridden districts of the exotic city called Maradaine. A Murder of Mages introduces us to this spellbinding port city as seen through the eyes of the people who strive to maintain law and order, the hardworking men and women of the Maradaine Constabulary.
 
Satrine Rainey—former street rat, ex-spy, mother of two, and wife to a Constabulary Inspector who lies on the edge of death, injured in the line of duty—has been forced to fake her way into the post of Constabulary Inspector to support her family.
 
Minox Welling is a brilliant, unorthodox Inspector and an Uncircled mage—almost a crime in itself. Nicknamed “the jinx” because of the misfortunes that seem to befall anyone around him, Minox has been partnered with Satrine because no one else will work with either of them.
 
Their first case together—the ritual murder of a Circled mage— sends Satrine back to the streets she grew up on and brings Minox face-to-face with mage politics he’s desperate to avoid. As the body count rises, Satrine and Minox must race to catch the killer before their own secrets are exposed and they, too, become targets.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 06 Jul 2015 06:57:47 -0400)

A Murder of Mages marks the debut of Marshall Ryan Maresca's novels of The Maradaine Constabulary, his second series set amid the bustling streets and crime-ridden districts of the exotic city called Maradaine. A Murder of Mages introduces us to this spellbinding port city as seen through the eyes of the people who strive to maintain law and order, the hardworking men and women of the Maradaine Constabulary. Satrine Rainey--former street rat, ex-spy, mother of two, and wife to a Constabulary Inspector who lies on the edge of death, injured in the line of duty--has been forced to fake her way into the post of Constabulary Inspector to support her family. Minox Welling is a brilliant, unorthodox Inspector and an Uncircled mage--almost a crime in itself. Nicknamed "the jinx" because of the misfortunes that seem to befall anyone around him, Minox has been partnered with Satrine because no one else will work with either of them. Their first case together--the ritual murder of a Circled mage--sends Satrine back to the streets she grew up on and brings Minox face-to-face with mage politics he's desperate to avoid. As the body count rises, Satrine and Minox must race to catch the killer before their own secrets are exposed and they, too, become targets.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.71)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 7
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,801,668 books! | Top bar: Always visible