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Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be

by Marshall Goldsmith, Marshall Goldsmith, Marshall Goldsmith, Mark Reiter

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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292868,608 (4.05)2
Executive coach and psychologist Marshall Goldsmith discusses the emotional triggers that set off a reaction or a behavior in us that often works to our detriment. Do you find that at times you suddenly become defensive or enraged by an idle comment from a colleague? Or that your temper rises when another car cuts you off in traffic? Your reactions don't occur in a vacuum. They are the result of emotional and psychological triggers that often happen only in specific settings -- at meetings, or in competitive situations, or with a specific person who rubs you the wrong way, or when you feel under particular pressure. Being able to recognize those triggers and understand how the environment affects our behavior is key to controlling our responses and managing others at work and in life. Make no mistake -- change is hard. And the starting point is the willingness to accept help, and the desire to change. Over the course of this book, Marshall explores the power of active questions to get us to take responsibility for our actions -- and our failure to act. Questions such as "Did I do my best to make progress toward my goal?" "Did I work hard at being fully engaged?" He discusses the importance of structure in effecting permanent change. Because, he points out, change is hard, and without a structure to keep us on track, we inevitably relapse and fall back. Filled with stories from Marshall's work with executives and leaders, Triggers shows readers how to achieve meaningful and sustained change that will allow us to open our imaginations and escape the rigidity of binary thinking.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Marshall Goldsmith’s book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts--Becoming the Person You Want to Be is about adult behavioral change. Frankly, I could use some of that right now. 2019 was not a great year for me and I could use some attitude adjustment. As Goldsmith noted, “A trigger is any stimulus that reshapes our thoughts and actions” (Goldsmith, 2015, p. xv). Too many things are triggering me and I need to regain control. I think this book can help me. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
If you can to pick a single self-help book, this should be the one. Relatively short, to the point (for these kind of books), relatable examples & will just flow.

Daily questions, hourly questions, how you are the master of your time and you can decide how to spend it. ( )
  sami7 | Aug 3, 2020 |
As far as self-improvement books go this one is a strong 'meh'. The approach to view your environment as a big cause for the behavior you end up having is something I gave little thought about up until reading this book but it's not something that I feel will have a huge impact on me.

I have a hunch the advice in the book works well for CEOs and managers because they are particularly analytical when it comes to their own traits, strengths and weaknesses. They are exactly the kind of people that a scoring approach to changing yourself would work on.

I would've loved the book if the author delved deeper into the reasoning of why his approach is valid and reached something that any non-CEO person would be able to use.

TL;DR: It's not a bad self-improvement book but it's highly tailored for upper management and corporation type individuals. ( )
  parzivalTheVirtual | Mar 22, 2020 |
Not a book I would normally pick up - reading for a work mentoring thing...
  Janellreads | Oct 18, 2017 |
Such great insights! Inspiring and easy to implement concepts. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 22, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Marshall Goldsmithprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goldsmith, Marshallmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Goldsmith, Marshallmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Reiter, Markmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Goldsmith, MarshallAuthormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Executive coach and psychologist Marshall Goldsmith discusses the emotional triggers that set off a reaction or a behavior in us that often works to our detriment. Do you find that at times you suddenly become defensive or enraged by an idle comment from a colleague? Or that your temper rises when another car cuts you off in traffic? Your reactions don't occur in a vacuum. They are the result of emotional and psychological triggers that often happen only in specific settings -- at meetings, or in competitive situations, or with a specific person who rubs you the wrong way, or when you feel under particular pressure. Being able to recognize those triggers and understand how the environment affects our behavior is key to controlling our responses and managing others at work and in life. Make no mistake -- change is hard. And the starting point is the willingness to accept help, and the desire to change. Over the course of this book, Marshall explores the power of active questions to get us to take responsibility for our actions -- and our failure to act. Questions such as "Did I do my best to make progress toward my goal?" "Did I work hard at being fully engaged?" He discusses the importance of structure in effecting permanent change. Because, he points out, change is hard, and without a structure to keep us on track, we inevitably relapse and fall back. Filled with stories from Marshall's work with executives and leaders, Triggers shows readers how to achieve meaningful and sustained change that will allow us to open our imaginations and escape the rigidity of binary thinking.

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