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Clinton Cash (2015)

by Peter Schweizer

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575742,503 (3.84)None
In 2000, Bill and Hillary Clinton owed millions of dollars in legal debt. Since then, they've earned over $130 million. Where did the money come from? Most people assume that the Clintons amassed their wealth through lucrative book deals and high-six figure fees for speaking gigs. Now, Peter Schweizer shows who is really behind those enormous payments.… (more)
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The Clintons grew rich not through their own efforts but by the largesse of foreign governments. In the long lead up to Mrs. Clinton’s campaign announcement, aides proved adept in swatting down critical books as conservative propaganda, including Edward Klein’s “Blood Feud,” about tensions between the Clintons and the Obamas, and Daniel Halper’s “Clinton Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine.”

But “Clinton Cash” is potentially more unsettling, both because of its focused reporting and because major news organizations including the Times, The Washington Post and Fox News have exclusive agreements with the author to pursue the story lines found in the book.

That's right. At least some of Schweizer's reporting checked out and informed mainstream news reports. The Washington Post reported last April that “Bill Clinton was paid at least $26 million in speaking fees by companies and organizations that are also major donors to the foundation he created after leaving the White House.”
  gmicksmith | Sep 17, 2022 |
The book is better than its title. (The title of another Schweizer book, Throw Them All Out is, in terms of titles of books about politics, second only to P. J. O'Roarke's Parliament of Whores.) Belonging on the Shocked To Find Gambling in Casablanca shelf, Clinton Cash details the apparent (and obvious) connections between donations to the Clinton Foundation and Hilary's influence as Secretary of State. Topics include uranium mining rights in Kazakhstan, nuclear weapons in India, telecommunications in Sweden, and relief efforts in Haiti. Mark Rich also makes some appearances. (Remember him?) Schweizer and his team have done significant research--the claims are extensively documented and footnoted--but this doesn't always make for a good read. Each paragraph contains the names of two new people who disappear a page later and there are many acronyms to which a reader has to flip back a page to recall the organizations for which they stand. There also aren't many interesting turn-of-phrases or moment of irony. If you're interested in the story, check out the 60 Minutes story in which they interviewed Schweizer about his book Extortion>. ( )
  Stubb | Aug 28, 2018 |
The Clintons are as crooked as the day is long. I thought the book was very informative. Who would ever pay Slick Willie a half million dollars for a speech, unless it was a bribe. The Clintons have lied to the public throughout their political careers. Who can forget, "I did not have sexual relations with that woman," Slick Will declared. Even though this book and other books point out their indiscretions and crimes, I have doubt that they will ever pay for their crimes. Some people are above the law. Two thumbs up for the book. Two thumbs down for the Clintons. ( )
  branjohb | Jan 17, 2018 |
Is this the book that lead to Hillary's downfall?
1 vote gmicksmith | Nov 3, 2016 |
Anyone who reads this book and does not come away with the feeling that the Clintons have been taking the US for a ride, for a very long time, should pour another cup of coffee and read the book again. As has already been said, it is well-researched and the "coincidences" are beyond extraordinary. It should also be noted that the Clinton Foundation has been able to amass a bank balance never before experienced by a legitimate charity, in such a short time, without a major disaster or other such occurrence for which major funding would have been needed. This book should be required reading for every voter, before the upcoming election. ( )
1 vote K.J. | Oct 28, 2016 |
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Ask Team Clinton about the flow of tens of millions of dollars to the Clinton Foundation (the formal name is the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation, originally called the William J. Clinton Foundation) from foreign governments, corporations, and financiers and you typically get an interesting explanation: it's a sign of love.
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In 2000, Bill and Hillary Clinton owed millions of dollars in legal debt. Since then, they've earned over $130 million. Where did the money come from? Most people assume that the Clintons amassed their wealth through lucrative book deals and high-six figure fees for speaking gigs. Now, Peter Schweizer shows who is really behind those enormous payments.

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