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Sister to the Sioux : the memoirs of Elaine…
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Sister to the Sioux : the memoirs of Elaine Goodale Eastman, 1885-91 (edition 1978)

by Elaine Goodale Eastman, Kay Graber

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"It was held a distinct adventure back in the demure 1880s for a properly brought-up New England girl to open a day school in a primitive Sioux village," Elaine Goodale Eastman recalled in later years. With boundless energy and dedication she had set out to teach the white man's ways to the Sioux. The Indian women called her "little sister" as she entered wholeheartedly into village activities. She watched the emergence of the Ghost Dance religion, visited with Sitting Bull shortly before his death, and was at Pine Ridge during the last month of 1890--"a time of grim suspense." There she met her future husband, Dr. Charles Eastman, the agency physician and a mixed-blood Sioux. A short time later they shared in the heart-wrenching job of caring for the survivors of the Wounded Knee massacre.… (more)
Member:TrumanBerry
Title:Sister to the Sioux : the memoirs of Elaine Goodale Eastman, 1885-91
Authors:Elaine Goodale Eastman
Other authors:Kay Graber
Info:University of Nebraska Press Lincoln
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Sister to the Sioux: The Memoirs of Elaine Goodale Eastman, 1885-91 (The Pioneer Heritage Series, Vol. 7) by Elaine Goodale Eastman

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from Amazon: "It was held a distinct adventure back in the demure 1880s for a properly brought-up New England girl to open a day school in a primitive Sioux village," Elaine Goodale Eastman recalled in later years. With boundless energy and dedication she had set out to teach the white man's ways to the Sioux. The Indian women called her "little sister" as she entered wholeheartedly into village activities.
She watched the emergence of the Ghost Dance religion, visited with Sitting Bull shortly before his death, and was at Pine Ridge during the last month of 1890—"a time of grim suspense." There she met her future husband, Dr. Charles Eastman, the agency physician and a mixed-blood Sioux. A short time later they shared in the heart-wrenching job of caring for the survivors of the Wounded Knee massacre."

"We must be impressed by this talented woman who gave herself so completely to the people she chose to serve. Her story is fascinating, a real contribution to the history of the period."--"American Indian Quarterly"

From Loot.co.za: In 1885, a genteel New England girl travelled to the western frontier to open a school on the Great Sioux Reservation. For six years, Elaine Goodale Eastman taught, hunted with, and lived among the Lakotas, who were experiencing profound changes as buffalo herds dwindled and they were forced to adjust to reservation life. Her informative and sometimes poignant recollections of those years tell much about the daily lives of the Lakotas and how they grappled with challenges to their way of life. Goodale Eastman witnessed the arrival and flowering of the Ghost Dance religion, visited with Sitting Bull shortly before his death, and in December 1890 was at Pine Ridge, where she and her future husband, Dr. Charles Eastman, cared for the survivors of the Wounded Knee massacre. Sister to the Sioux bears witness to a critical and tragic era in Lakota history and reveals the frequently contradictory attitudes of outsiders drawn to them. Kay Graber is also the editor of Standing Bear and the Ponca Chiefs, available in a Bison Books edition. Theodore D. Sargent is a professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and is completing a biography of Elaine Goodale Eastman.
  UncleSamZ | Oct 29, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Elaine Goodale Eastmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Graber, KayEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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My Father, Henry Sterling Goodale,  was the seventh child and youngest son in a family of eight, which traced its American heritage back to the ancestor who landed at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1632.
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