HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Death's End (The Three-Body Problem…
Loading...

Death's End (The Three-Body Problem Series, 3) (edition 2017)

by Cixin Liu (Author), Ken Liu (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,903787,041 (4.19)42
With The Three-Body Problem , English-speaking readers got their first chance to experience the multiple-award-winning and bestselling Three-Body Trilogy by China's most beloved science fiction author, Cixin Liu. Three-Body was released to great acclaim including coverage in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. It was also named a finalist for the Nebula Award, making it the first translated novel to be nominated for a major SF award since Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities in 1976. Now this epic trilogy concludes with Death's End . Half a century after the Doomsday Battle, the uneasy balance of Dark Forest Deterrence keeps the Trisolaran invaders at bay. Earth enjoys unprecedented prosperity due to the infusion of Trisolaran knowledge. With human science advancing daily and the Trisolarans adopting Earth culture, it seems that the two civilizations will soon be able to co-exist peacefully as equals without the terrible threat of mutually assured annihilation. But the peace has also made humanity complacent. Cheng Xin, an aerospace engineer from the early 21st century, awakens from hibernation in this new age. She brings with her knowledge of a long-forgotten program dating from the beginning of the Trisolar Crisis, and her very presence may upset the delicate balance between two worlds. Will humanity reach for the stars or die in its cradle?… (more)
Member:kullervo16
Title:Death's End (The Three-Body Problem Series, 3)
Authors:Cixin Liu (Author)
Other authors:Ken Liu (Translator)
Info:Tor Books (2017), Edition: Reprint, 624 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:e-book

Work Information

Death's End by Cixin Liu

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 42 mentions

English (72)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  Catalan (1)  German (1)  Italian (1)  French (1)  All languages (78)
Showing 1-5 of 72 (next | show all)
Jamás un libro de ciencia ficción escrita por una persona china tuvo tanta dispersión en su crítica literaria en Occidente. A mí es el que más me ha gustado de la trilogía, quizá por separarse de la ingenuidad de los primeros y centrar sus esfuerzos en la propuesta científica de cómo evitar lo descubierto en el segundo más que en la evolución de las relaciones sentimentales entre personajes. Ojo, no estoy en contra de que los humanos se comporten como humanos ni desdeño un buen trasfondo emocional, pero la forma en la que se mostraban los romances en los otros me resultaba más alienígena que los trisolarianos.

Además, soy un fanático de las novelas de naves generacionales como [b:Mayflies|1335295|Mayflies|Kevin O'Donnell Jr.|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1360522492s/1335295.jpg|1324832], y esta podría encuadrarse en este subgénero a pesar de que la nave no sea la misma todo el rato y las generaciones... Voy a parar, no quiero estropearle la historia a nadie.

Si acaso, lo que podría acharcarse a la novela es un cierto espíritu powergamer de querer darle a cada capítulo una vuelta de rosca más que el anterior hasta llegar al final, que a muchas personas ha resultado delirante (en el mal sentido). A mí, que cada día estoy más a favor de la fantasía en contraposición a la idiocia social imperante, me pareció una buena cosa y envidio la situación de sus protagonistas a pesar de todo. ( )
  tecniferio | May 12, 2022 |
Like Book 1 of Cixin Liu’s towering The Three-Body Problem series, Book 3 begins with a siege.

But while the first book opened in 1967 (during China’s Cultural Revolution), the third book—Death’s End—flashes back to 1453 (during the Ottomans’ assault on Constantinople). It’s a bit disconcerting given that the second book left off in 2213.

The chronological zigzag makes sense given where the middle entry in the series concluded, however. Book 2 seemingly resolved the central conflict: Earth, threatened with invasion by aliens from Trisolaris, stumbled upon a form of deterrence relying on mutually assured destruction (not unlike the nuclear détente of the Cold War). The Trisolarans conceded defeat and changed course; humanity’s future looked secure.

So without a cliffhanger to contend with—as most Book 2s bequeath to Book 3s—why not rewind a few centuries?

Liu uses the opportunity to inject a bit of fantasy into his science fiction: an assassin who can remove her targets’ organs without touching them. Then he returns to the early days of the Trisolaris crisis and introduces a few more new characters. He also backfills some plot devices before finally advancing the narrative past the epilogue of Book 2.

In other words, the story takes a while to get going. But the preamble has a purpose, and it becomes clear as the “Deterrence Era” devolves into something far less stable.

The result is extraordinary.

I still never quite connected with the characters. Liu features a different protagonist in each book, and although Cheng Xin, the lead for Death’s End, is the most sympathetic, I always felt a little distant from her.

That may have been by design. “I am but an ordinary person,” she says at one point. “Unfortunately, I have not been able to walk the ordinary person’s path. My path is, in reality, the journey of a civilization.” Liu seems to have conceived of her as an avatar for humanity—or at least a facet of it, while other characters often represent our baser instincts.

This scale is what impressed me most by the close of Death’s End. The series spans eons; the date for one of the last chapters is “About Seventeen Billion Years After the Beginning of Time.” Along the way, we see human culture evolve, Trisolaran culture adapt to human culture, and new civilizations enter (and exit) the galactic playing field.

Liu also shows us more mind-bending science: Lightspeed travel. Black-hole shields. A “Great Wall at the scale of the universe.” Life in four dimensions. Death in two.

Some of this is cloaked in clever fantasy (like the assassin’s trick in 15th century Constantinople). Other aspects are laid out in interstitial passages from A Past Outside of Time, a fake history Liu uses to bridge the time jumps and provide necessary context for a story with such a massive scope. Just about all of it worked for me by the end.

In his translator’s note, Ken Liu (another fabulous author) writes, “I continue to be awed by the genius of [Cixin Liu] every time I read another passage from this novel. Of the three books in the trilogy, this third one is my favorite.”

I felt the same way. The Three-Body Problem series wasn’t a quick read for me, but I won’t forget it anytime soon. What an achievement.

Note: Since the translation uses the English versions of the author’s name and his characters’, I did the same in this review.

(For more reviews like this one, see www.nickwisseman.com) ( )
  nickwisseman | May 5, 2022 |
Sagan lýsir ógnarjafnvægi Jarðarbúa og geimveranna Trisolaran eftir að geimflota þeirra fyrrnefndu hafði verið gereytt í miklum bardaga. Báðar tegundir hafa notið góðs af og margir sjá fram á bjarta framtíð.
En ógnarjafnvægi byggist á því að báðir aðilar séu reiðubúnir að gereyða hvor öðrum og Jarðarbúar eru orðnir of sjálfsöruggir. Sviftingar eru framundan fyrir báðar tegundir og í stríði geimvera er allt lagt að veði, meira að segja framtíð geimsins og endurfæðing.
Cixin lýkur hér þríleiknum Endurminningar um fortíð Jarðar, margverðlaunaður þríleikur eftir einn vinsælasta vísindaskáldsagnahöfund Kínverja. Hann birtir sannarlega myrka framtíðarsýn í þessum sögum sínum og heillaði mig algerlega. ( )
  SkuliSael | Apr 28, 2022 |
I'm rating the entire trilogy 4 stars, so that's what this book is getting. I gave the last 2 books of the series 3 stars, but that's just cuz I'm stingy with my stars. If you like science fiction, this is a must read. The grandest scope of anything I've ever encountered. If you're not a big sci-fi fan, then I think you may be bored by the stiff style and lack of character development.

The pacing of this 3rd book... I can't say it was boring, because I regularly picked it back up because I really wanted to learn what happened. But it wasn't a page turner. It stumbled into a lot of technical and descriptive details that felt unnecessary or redundant. I'm a big fan of Neal Stephenson, and he often does this, but manages to remain gripping. And there are many times when Liu's technical digressions are absolutely necessary and fascinating. But if the grander plot of this narrative weren't so captivating, I would have probably put it down.

My only other critique is that I still had a hard time buying the dramatic swings in collective consciousness throughout the timeline of the narrative. I won't go into more detail to avoid spoilers. I may be wrong. My criticism is ripe for discussion with someone who has actually read it... I just need to find that person. ( )
  invisiblecityzen | Mar 13, 2022 |
I'm rating the entire trilogy 4 stars, so that's what this book is getting. I gave the last 2 books of the series 3 stars, but that's just cuz I'm stingy with my stars. If you like science fiction, this is a must read. The grandest scope of anything I've ever encountered. If you're not a big sci-fi fan, then I think you may be bored by the stiff style and lack of character development.

The pacing of this 3rd book... I can't say it was boring, because I regularly picked it back up because I really wanted to learn what happened. But it wasn't a page turner. It stumbled into a lot of technical and descriptive details that felt unnecessary or redundant. I'm a big fan of Neal Stephenson, and he often does this, but manages to remain gripping. And there are many times when Liu's technical digressions are absolutely necessary and fascinating. But if the grander plot of this narrative weren't so captivating, I would have probably put it down.

My only other critique is that I still had a hard time buying the dramatic swings in collective consciousness throughout the timeline of the narrative. I won't go into more detail to avoid spoilers. I may be wrong. My criticism is ripe for discussion with someone who has actually read it... I just need to find that person. ( )
  invisiblecityzen | Mar 13, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 72 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Cixin Liuprimary authorall editionscalculated
Betz, KarinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Liu, KenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martinière, StephanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ochlan, P. J.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roubicek, BrunoNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Pausing to collect himself, Constantine XI pushed away the pile of city-defense maps in front of him, pulled his purple robe tighter, and waited.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

With The Three-Body Problem , English-speaking readers got their first chance to experience the multiple-award-winning and bestselling Three-Body Trilogy by China's most beloved science fiction author, Cixin Liu. Three-Body was released to great acclaim including coverage in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. It was also named a finalist for the Nebula Award, making it the first translated novel to be nominated for a major SF award since Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities in 1976. Now this epic trilogy concludes with Death's End . Half a century after the Doomsday Battle, the uneasy balance of Dark Forest Deterrence keeps the Trisolaran invaders at bay. Earth enjoys unprecedented prosperity due to the infusion of Trisolaran knowledge. With human science advancing daily and the Trisolarans adopting Earth culture, it seems that the two civilizations will soon be able to co-exist peacefully as equals without the terrible threat of mutually assured annihilation. But the peace has also made humanity complacent. Cheng Xin, an aerospace engineer from the early 21st century, awakens from hibernation in this new age. She brings with her knowledge of a long-forgotten program dating from the beginning of the Trisolar Crisis, and her very presence may upset the delicate balance between two worlds. Will humanity reach for the stars or die in its cradle?

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.19)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5
2 12
2.5 2
3 70
3.5 21
4 197
4.5 39
5 212

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 170,149,970 books! | Top bar: Always visible