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Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking,…
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Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (edition 2005)

by Michael Ruhlman

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478539,233 (4.44)7
Charcuterie exploded onto the scene in 2005 and encouraged an army of home cooks and professional chefs to start curing their own foods. This love song to animal fat and salt has blossomed into a bona fide culinary movement, throughout America and beyond, of curing meats and making sausage, p?t?s, and confits. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated will remain the ultimate and authoritative guide to that movement, spreading the revival of this ancient culinary craft. Early in his career, food writer Michael Ruhlman had his first taste of duck confit. The experience "became a fascination that transformed into a quest" to understand the larger world of food preservation, called charcuterie, once a critical factor in human survival. He wondered why its methods and preparations, which used to keep communities alive and allowed for long-distance exploration, had been almost forgotten. Along the way he met Brian Polcyn, who had been surrounded with traditional and modern charcuterie since childhood. "My Polish grandma made kielbasa every Christmas and Easter," he told Ruhlman. At the time, Polcyn was teaching butchery at Schoolcraft College outside Detroit. Ruhlman and Polcyn teamed up to share their passion for cured meats with a wider audience. The rest is culinary history. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated is organized into chapters on key practices: salt-cured meats like pancetta, dry-cured meats like salami and chorizo, forcemeats including p?t?s and terrines, and smoked meats and fish. Readers will find all the classic recipes: duck confit, sausages, prosciutto, bacon, p?t? de campagne, and knackwurst, among others. Ruhlman and Polcyn also expand on traditional mainstays, offering recipes for hot- and cold-smoked salmon; shrimp, lobster, and leek sausage; and grilled vegetable terrine. All these techniques make for a stunning addition to a contemporary menu. Thoroughly instructive and fully illustrated, this updated edition includes seventy-five detailed line drawings that guide the reader through all the techniques. With new recipes and revised sections to reflect the best equipment available today, Charcuterie: Revised and Updated remains the undisputed authority on charcuterie.… (more)
Member:rabelaisbooks
Title:Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing
Authors:Michael Ruhlman
Info:W. W. Norton (2005), Hardcover, 416 pages
Collections:Your library
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Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman

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English (4)  Swedish (1)  All languages (5)
Showing 4 of 4
Everything I ever wanted to know about preserving meat, fish, and fowl. How to whack, grind, chop, salt, brine, smoke, dry and otherwise create the yummiest meat, fish, and poultry. ( )
  debs913 | Apr 2, 2016 |
This got me started on Charcuterie, received it as a Christmas present and the next Thanksgiving served the sausages on the front cover. It is comprehensive and it is time consuming. At this point I have probably made 90% of the sausage, I regularly cure hams, wine coolers work well for this. I do hot and cold smoking. The French Garlic Sausage is a staple in the house.

It does take time, it takes a cold kitchen, it works better with good pork, especially for things like whole hams and bacon. ( )
1 vote wwj | Sep 2, 2010 |
Comprehensive coverage of a surprisingly rarely covered topic. Makes you appreciate how much effort goes behind what we see as everyday sausages and charcuterie. Oh, and also makes you want to pull out that meat grinder and start mincing. Anyone got some dead pig going spare? ( )
  jontseng | Apr 12, 2008 |
For those interested in meat and in foodsmoking, this is an extraordinarily thought-provoking book. But also potentially demanding in terms of one's commitment to putting in the time to create quality food. ( )
  Bibliophial | Dec 29, 2006 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Ruhlmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Polcyn, Brianmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Keller, ThomasForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Sometimes books are the result of a surprise, in this case a surprise (via duck confit) that became a fascination that transformed into a quest to understand this food that we still categorize under the broad label of charcuterie, a range of preparations from sausages to pâtés, confits to cured salmon, all of which have some sort of cure and preservation at their core.
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Charcuterie exploded onto the scene in 2005 and encouraged an army of home cooks and professional chefs to start curing their own foods. This love song to animal fat and salt has blossomed into a bona fide culinary movement, throughout America and beyond, of curing meats and making sausage, p?t?s, and confits. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated will remain the ultimate and authoritative guide to that movement, spreading the revival of this ancient culinary craft. Early in his career, food writer Michael Ruhlman had his first taste of duck confit. The experience "became a fascination that transformed into a quest" to understand the larger world of food preservation, called charcuterie, once a critical factor in human survival. He wondered why its methods and preparations, which used to keep communities alive and allowed for long-distance exploration, had been almost forgotten. Along the way he met Brian Polcyn, who had been surrounded with traditional and modern charcuterie since childhood. "My Polish grandma made kielbasa every Christmas and Easter," he told Ruhlman. At the time, Polcyn was teaching butchery at Schoolcraft College outside Detroit. Ruhlman and Polcyn teamed up to share their passion for cured meats with a wider audience. The rest is culinary history. Charcuterie: Revised and Updated is organized into chapters on key practices: salt-cured meats like pancetta, dry-cured meats like salami and chorizo, forcemeats including p?t?s and terrines, and smoked meats and fish. Readers will find all the classic recipes: duck confit, sausages, prosciutto, bacon, p?t? de campagne, and knackwurst, among others. Ruhlman and Polcyn also expand on traditional mainstays, offering recipes for hot- and cold-smoked salmon; shrimp, lobster, and leek sausage; and grilled vegetable terrine. All these techniques make for a stunning addition to a contemporary menu. Thoroughly instructive and fully illustrated, this updated edition includes seventy-five detailed line drawings that guide the reader through all the techniques. With new recipes and revised sections to reflect the best equipment available today, Charcuterie: Revised and Updated remains the undisputed authority on charcuterie.

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