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The Age of Reason: (1700-1789) by Harold…
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The Age of Reason: (1700-1789)

by Harold Nicolson

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822224,915 (4.14)1
Overview: This is a study of the 18th century. Nicolson called his book a gallery of portraits, e.g. Saint Simon, elegant, a social climber; the dashing Prince Potemkin; Count Cagliostro, practitioner of black arts; Thomas Paine, inflamer of the masses; Jacques Casanova, lover, pornographer, and con man. This single masterful volume synthesizes, through people and events, the 18th century ideals of reason and liberty, the attack on superstition, tradition and authority that shook the world and produced a revolution in values. New Introduction by Adam Nicolson, Harold Nicolson's grandson.… (more)

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I've enjoyed many of old Harold's books. He also held 'Orlando's' hand when she had nothing better to do. ( )
  Porius | Dec 31, 2010 |
849 The Age of Reason The Eighteenth Century, by Harold Nicolson (read 27 Apr 1966) Until yesterday I thought the book I finished today was quite the book. It is a study of the 18th century, or aspects of it, mostly by tracing vignettes of persons: Saint Simon (1695-1755); Pierre Boyle (1647-1706); Louis XIV; Peter the Great; Voltaire (1694-1778); Frederick the Great; Catherine the Great (astonishing!); Addison; Swift; Franklin; Horace Walpole; Louis XV; Cagliostro; Samuel Johnson; Thomas Paine; John Wesley; and Rousseau. Much fascinating historical material. But then I attended a theology class and was enthralled! The book being used is In the Redeeming Christ, by F. X. Durrwell. I read two chapters before class and got nothing out of it. But what an elucidation the class was! Real teaching--making the meaningless full of meaning! I am astounded. The concept of Christ's death--the redemption occurs at that time--I never heard before . Simply enthralling exposition. ( )
  Schmerguls | Jul 18, 2010 |
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