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The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley
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The Stars Are Legion (edition 2017)

by Kameron Hurley (Author)

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6773729,808 (3.62)33
Somewhere on the outer rim of the universe, a mass of decaying worldships known as the Legion is traveling in the seams between the stars. For generations, a war for control of the Legion has been waged, with no clear resolution. As worlds continue to die, a desperate plan is put into motion. Zan wakes with no memory, prisoner of a people who say they are her family. She is told she is their salvation - the only person capable of boarding the Mokshi, a world-ship with the power to leave the Legion. But Zan's new family is not the only one desperate to gain control of the prized ship. Zan must choose sides in a genocidal campaign that will take her from the edges of the Legion's gravity well to the very belly of the world. Zan will soon learn that she carries the seeds of the Legion's destruction - and its possible salvation.… (more)
Member:ucelluccia
Title:The Stars Are Legion
Authors:Kameron Hurley (Author)
Info:Gallery / Saga Press (2017), Edition: Reprint, 400 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley

  1. 00
    Harrow the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (Aquila)
    Aquila: The experience of reading Harrow kept making me think of The Stars are Legion.
  2. 00
    Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (aspirit)
    aspirit: More warrior lesbians in space, with more genders and (arguably) less body horror.
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» See also 33 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
This, alas, was not a story for me, in several senses; characters, plot, and imagery among them.

I empathized with Zan, but hated Jayd, which I believe the author intended only part of the time. I tended to skim her segments. There is a great deal of hidden motive, but I figured out too much too soon, and so lost the intrigue. (I'm also not as patient a reader as I used to be, so the long, necessary trek bored me.) I enjoyed Zan's band of friends. But every other character, even the weirdest witch, seemed flat, which frankly surprises me.

Only the cephalopod guns intrigued me, and only because they're so weirdly funny to imagine.

I joked on Twitter that I was having trouble finishing this book because there are no boys, but in truth it was because there are too many characters I just didn't care about. I'd categorize this as science fantasy. ( )
  terriaminute | Dec 4, 2022 |
What a wild ride. The world building is fascinating, though it does overshadow everything else at some parts.

The way the world repairs itself is at once disgusting as well as interesting. The world (and to all intents and purposes the universe) only has one gender, so no men allowed. The women are impregnated at the whims of the organic worldship they all live in (there are many, all part of the Legion) and the results are rarely human. All of this is very original. However, the plot itself was not as ingenious.

I can enjoy a story built around amnesia, but when the only hook is the continuous dangling of knowledge right out of the main characters (as well as the reader's) grasp, the going gets tough and the reading gets a little tedious.

And with that build up, I kind of expected something a lot more spectacular from the ending.

I'm giving this a generous four stars, mostly for originality and world-building. ( )
  tuusannuuska | Dec 1, 2022 |
Ok, so I finished this book because I felt like if I had a lot of negative things to say, I should at least give it a fair reading. On the whole, this was a just not for me, because I want likeable characters to the point where the spectacular world building could not save this book. This is one of those horrible people being horrible and manipulative to other people books, and I just don't enjoy that sort of book at all. I don't even care that it was all in the service of some greater good or tiny sliver of hope. The premise never really panned out -- why is Mokshi so different from the other worlds? despite a few throwaway lines that it is different because it was built to be, that is never explained. In fact, most of the culture/development history of the societies is only ever given a wide brush -- which I guess makes sense given their level of disintegration, but I found unsatisfying. Further problems below:

1: cultural appropriation of names. Why are the brutal women in this book all named with East Indian names? And why are the tribes/world inhabitants similarly named? It's deliberate enough to be striking, but I'm not really getting any actual inspiration from the Bhagavad Gita, so I feel like this is an appropriation of the exotic, rather than an exploration/retelling of Indian Mythology. Flair without substance bothers me.

2: Honestly, so far it feels like a want-to-be Ancillary Justice with an anti-hero as opposed to likeable characters and more! hot! lesbian! sex scenes. I'm in favor of lesbian love scenes, but this feels like shock factor and I am not super impressed. I mean I think it's cool to explore the ideas of a world without men, I guess? But what is the point of that, except in making it perfectly clear that women are equally horrible? Or maybe just to emphasize the gory horribleness of people birthing things all over the place. blech.

3: The weird organic worlds are fascinating, and in general the world-building is excellent -- except. Except that it doesn't really make any sense. They are trying to get out of a solar system? They are trying to capture a different kind of world? I am hoping that this is a thing that becomes gradually revealed. As it is, it definitely sells the alien aspect, because it's clear that whatever is going on may not have analogues to my body of knowledge at all.

4: Seriously? Cephalopods as weapons? Why? That doesn't even make sense. Are they eating the main characters? Is this an opera of mollusks? They spread rot? What?

Clearly there are people who love this book, and all I can say is more for you! ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
I'm not entirely convinced the plot completely held together, but it was a pretty entertaining ride. ( )
  Jon_Hansen | Feb 18, 2022 |
It wasn't a bad read, but it was so visceral and gory that I don't know that I'd ever want to re-read it. High squick tolerance needed to get through this book. I do wonder if a lot of the squick was because Hurley used language and descriptors to refer to things in the world that seemingly couldn't exist there which just upped the disgust factor (like the apples). I don't want to think too deeply about it.

It was cool how everybody was a woman, and the plot and world-building that hinged on that. I did have to keep checking my assumptions and automatic assignment of male pronouns to unknown entities. It was also a case of "literally nobody is a good guy" which some people can find wearisome.

But oh my goodness it was so gross. ( )
  Tikimoof | Feb 17, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
It was the edge that broke us. When we went over the edge, something came over with us.
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For all the brutal women
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I remember throwing away a child.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Somewhere on the outer rim of the universe, a mass of decaying worldships known as the Legion is traveling in the seams between the stars. For generations, a war for control of the Legion has been waged, with no clear resolution. As worlds continue to die, a desperate plan is put into motion. Zan wakes with no memory, prisoner of a people who say they are her family. She is told she is their salvation - the only person capable of boarding the Mokshi, a world-ship with the power to leave the Legion. But Zan's new family is not the only one desperate to gain control of the prized ship. Zan must choose sides in a genocidal campaign that will take her from the edges of the Legion's gravity well to the very belly of the world. Zan will soon learn that she carries the seeds of the Legion's destruction - and its possible salvation.

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