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The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs:…
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The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs: Use Outdoor Clues to Find… (edition 2015)

by Tristan Gooley (Author)

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5551030,969 (3.64)3
'Even the intrepid Bear Grylls could learn a trick or two from this book' The Times The ultimate guide to what the land, sun, moon, stars, trees, plants, animals, sky and clouds can reveal - when you know what to look for. Includes over 850 outdoor clues and signs. This top ten bestseller is the result of Tristan Gooley's two decades of pioneering outdoors experience and six years of instructing, researching and writing. It includes lots of outdoor clues and signs that will not be found in any other book in the world. As well as the most comprehensive guide to natural navigation for walkers ever compiled, it also contains clues for weather forecasting, tracking, city walks, coast walks, night walks and dozens of other areas.… (more)
Member:revmattmonroe
Title:The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs: Use Outdoor Clues to Find Your Way, Predict the Weather, Locate Water, Track Animals―and Other Forgotten Skills (Natural Navigation)
Authors:Tristan Gooley (Author)
Info:The Experiment (2015), Edition: Reprint, 416 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Walker's Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs by Tristan Gooley

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Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Following on from his previous books, The natural Navigator & The Natural Explorer, Gooley in this one is hoping to expand your knowledge of the natural world. It is a reference work, written to be used to build your knowledge of the outside environment, with lots of examples and is packed with data for you to use and learn.

Using clues from the sky and the flora and fauna around you, he will teach you how to tell the time using the stars, how listening to the sounds that birds make will tell you if there is anyone else out there with you, how to read the lie of the land, use the plants and trees to gauge where the compass points are, the prevailing winds to get decent shelter and how to read and use the phases of the moon for night walks. He has included a couple of chapters on the urban environment too, and shows how to use your observation skills on items like TV aerials to ascertain direction and how the use of modern technology like smartphones has led to changes in how and where people shop. He has also included an account of a trip to Borneo, and of his time spent with the nomadic natives there, understanding how they moved and navigated through dense jungles.

A fascinating book, packed full of details and tip for enhancing any journey or trip that you take. One of the most important things that you can take away from this is the power of observation of your environment can reveal so much detail about where you are. Well worth reading. 3.5 stars overall
( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
* Temperature inversion: warm air traps cold air
* Can smell smoke from far away that gets trapped
* Sound travels faster, so can hear distant sounds
* Refraction changes. Normally distant thugs like sun appear squashed. With inversion they appear stretched vertically
* Extreme case is Fata Morgana where bridges and boats levitate above water
* Rayleigh scattering (why sky is blue) makes further objects s appear lighter in color
* Low sun on our back enhanced the colors in front of us
* Slopes facing wind have thinner soil and shorter trees
* Don’t look at anything moving when balance is critical
* Glaciers flowing up a rock smoothe it, going down roughen it
* Rivers can be tidal with opposite flows
* Smooth pebbles mean erosion by glacier or rover
* Second set of bike car tires will cut closer to the curve and override the front ones tracks. So you can tell direction.
* Moss indicates north, moisture
* Lichens indicate clean air, south side ( )
  raheelahmad | Mar 22, 2020 |
This is a wonderful book to help walkers pay more attention to what they see in nature. Although I am unlikely to ever examine all of the clues and signs discussed, I can report that the book inspired me to look at what I saw during my most recent treks. ( )
  M_Clark | Aug 30, 2019 |
Great read. Too verbose. This stuff requires bullet points, not lengthy prose. Give me the nuggets and I'll travel the wilds actually looking. ( )
  chriszodrow | Apr 9, 2019 |
I'm someone who spends a lot of time outdoors, and I really liked the central idea of this book, persuading us to look at the landscape in a purposive way, asking ourselves why that hill or that tree is in that place and that shape, and what information we can derive from that about where we are in relation to the earth and its weather, what the history of that particular landscape might be, and how the things we see relate to each other. It's a little bit like the way people used to do "natural history" 70 or 80 years ago (remember "Romany of the BBC"?), but with more of a practical hard edge: Gooley teaches something he calls "natural navigation", the art of finding your way about just using the information of your senses, without any useful tools like maps, compasses and GPS, and a lot of what he tells us to look out for here is related to that kind of activity.

Although the book is arranged in a slightly haphazard way, it has a good, comprehensive index, and would probably work quite well to refer to in real situations. But a lot of the more detailed information in the book is specific to what you might see in southern England (Sussex), so you would need to do quite some mutatis mutandis if you have the misfortune not to live around there.

What undermined the pleasure of reading this book for me was the constant irritation of being in contact with Gooley's "professional instructor" voice. He comes across as the sort of person the trainees would cook and eat on the third day of the survival course - a man with a suitably didactic anecdote for every occasion, and an exotic experience to trump every one of yours. Maybe he's not at all like that in real life, but on the printed page he's a bit hard to put up with. ( )
  thorold | Aug 28, 2017 |
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"The Walker's Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs" was republished in the USA as "The Lost Art of Reading Nature's Signs"
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'Even the intrepid Bear Grylls could learn a trick or two from this book' The Times The ultimate guide to what the land, sun, moon, stars, trees, plants, animals, sky and clouds can reveal - when you know what to look for. Includes over 850 outdoor clues and signs. This top ten bestseller is the result of Tristan Gooley's two decades of pioneering outdoors experience and six years of instructing, researching and writing. It includes lots of outdoor clues and signs that will not be found in any other book in the world. As well as the most comprehensive guide to natural navigation for walkers ever compiled, it also contains clues for weather forecasting, tracking, city walks, coast walks, night walks and dozens of other areas.

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