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Talking to My Daughter About the Economy: A Brief History of Capitalism (2017)

by Yanis Varoufakis

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5731342,605 (4.03)24
In Talking to My Daughter About the Economy, activist Yanis Varoufakis, Greece's former finance minister and the author of the international bestseller Adults in the Room, pens a series of letters to his young daughter, educating her about the business, politics, and corruption of world economics. Yanis Varoufakis has appeared before heads of nations, assemblies of experts, and countless students around the world. Now, he faces his most important and difficult audience yet. Using clear language and vivid examples, Varoufakis offers a series of letters to his young daughter about the economy: how it operates, where it came from, how it benefits some while impoverishing others. Taking bankers and politicians to task, he explains the historical origins of inequality among and within nations, questions the pervasive notion that everything has its price, and shows why economic instability is a chronic risk. Finally, he discusses the inability of market-driven policies to address the rapidly declining health of the planet his daughters generation stands to inherit. Throughout, Varoufakis wears his expertise lightly. He writes as a parent whose aim is to instruct his daughter on the fundamental questions of our age and through that knowledge, to equip her against the failures and obfuscations of our current system and point the way toward a more democratic alternative.… (more)
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» See also 24 mentions

English (10)  Spanish (2)  All languages (12)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
The books is very approachable in explaining concepts like state debt and unemployment. I don't regret reading it and can even recommend with an important caveat: it is poisoned with etatism. Varoufakis sees the state as an ultimate solution to all the problems, while most of the times it is exactly the source of these problems. To be fair he does mention the inherently unbreakable bond between bankers and politicians couple of times, but still justifies strong state existence. He even sees the wise state as a solution for bitcoin-related scums. Who else gonna help us poor little bastards to live our lives if not the almighty state, right? (No) ( )
  kosta.finn | Jul 9, 2023 |
continue on p 135
  pollycallahan | Jul 1, 2023 |
A clever non-technical left-wing survey of all of economics that is written as if addressed to the author's daughter. ( )
  markm2315 | Jul 1, 2023 |
My niece, Isabella recommended me to read this book. If you're not familiar with the subject of economics, or capitalism, for that matter, it can be a hard start but I recommend reading it slowly, and sticking with it, as there are concepts, examples, and ideas thrown about in the start to help you better understand. It's much more enjoyable the farther chapters you reach. The author takes the premise of writing to his daughter that gives the work an energetic flow whereas contemporary books might seem dry. There are matters and workings of the banking system that leave you at moments flabbergasted and you don't believe it could be so. In all, I learned a lot, and found Yanis Varoufakis's book an excellent read worth revisiting in the future as an introduction to capitalism and the world around us. ( )
  ironjaw | Oct 12, 2021 |
To be honest, I'm not sure if I like this book because it's good or just because I agree with the author about the limitations of profit-driven society and the ability of The Market to solve all the world's problems. I suppose it's possible I like it for both reasons. At the very least, it's engagingly written and is perhaps the most enjoyable book about economics that I have read. I'm going to buy a copy so I can refer to it later. ( )
1 vote ImperfectCJ | Jan 16, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
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In Talking to My Daughter About the Economy, activist Yanis Varoufakis, Greece's former finance minister and the author of the international bestseller Adults in the Room, pens a series of letters to his young daughter, educating her about the business, politics, and corruption of world economics. Yanis Varoufakis has appeared before heads of nations, assemblies of experts, and countless students around the world. Now, he faces his most important and difficult audience yet. Using clear language and vivid examples, Varoufakis offers a series of letters to his young daughter about the economy: how it operates, where it came from, how it benefits some while impoverishing others. Taking bankers and politicians to task, he explains the historical origins of inequality among and within nations, questions the pervasive notion that everything has its price, and shows why economic instability is a chronic risk. Finally, he discusses the inability of market-driven policies to address the rapidly declining health of the planet his daughters generation stands to inherit. Throughout, Varoufakis wears his expertise lightly. He writes as a parent whose aim is to instruct his daughter on the fundamental questions of our age and through that knowledge, to equip her against the failures and obfuscations of our current system and point the way toward a more democratic alternative.

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